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  • Exploring 2018 eyeforpharma’s key topics: A delegate’s view from Barcelona
    • 03/22/18
    • Health
    • Global
    • English

    Exploring 2018 eyeforpharma’s key topics: A delegate’s view from Barcelona

    Is pharma ready for disruption?

    Pharma certainly is one of the biggest candidates for a major disruption, which has already taken place in many other industries. Thus, attendees arrived at eyeforpharma with high expectations to find out about the status of the transition process in their industry and what steps have already been taken with regard to technological and cultural disruption.

    A changing pharma paradigm in search of technical solutions

    Everyone is aware of a rapidly changing paradigm in pharma/HCP/patient relationship. Just as in previous years, topics such as customer engagement, patient-centricity and multichannel marketing management remained key. Expectations were high with regard to technical solutions addressing these challenges. Some interesting cases were presented, such as early involvement of patients in the R&D journey, measuring the value of patient-centric approaches and patient engagement.

    Unlike in previous years, a good deal of attention was payed to transformational technologies to unlock data and how to integrate it into multichannel platforms. It also became clear that it is the tech companies, such as Microsoft and Google, that are driving the technical disruption by means of artificial intelligence, machine learning and remote monitoring of treatments via cloud.

    Looking for the necessary next step for thinking beyond the pill

    It makes sense that the pharma industry, as such, would be open to change. Still the disruption is in its infancy and its progress as such remains difficult to measure.

    Although single solutions and promising initiatives were demonstrated, the key question remains: What is actually inhibiting the necessary business transformation in order for pharma to truly think beyond the pill?

    With digital solutions already available, above all, a cultural change, as well as a change of mindset within the organizations, is required. The rise of omni-channel engagement and collaboration across boundaries with all stakeholders have yet to be improved. To keep pace with the fourth technical revolution, the pharmaceutical industry will have to redouble their cooperation with technical solution providers.

    To share your thoughts, email jan.guse@gfk.com or leave a comment below.

  • GfK releases new digital maps for Germany, Austria and Switzerland
    • 03/22/18
    • Press
    • Geomarketing
    • Geodata
    • Digital Maps
    • Digital Maps
    • Global
    • English

    GfK releases new digital maps for Germany, Austria and Switzerland

    GfK’s new digital maps for Germany, Austria and Switzerland include hundreds of changes to postal and administrative regions, such as municipalities. Up-to-date digital maps comprise the foundation for the precise and error-free geocoding and analysis of company data and market potential.

  • GfK releases new digital maps for Asia
    • 03/21/18
    • Press
    • Geomarketing
    • Geodata
    • Digital Maps
    • Digital Maps
    • Global
    • English

    GfK releases new digital maps for Asia

    GfK has released a new, completely overhauled digital map edition for all of Asia. The edition features coverage of 49 countries, ranging from the three BRICS nations Russia, India and China to smaller countries such as Bhutan.

  • In a fast-moving marketplace, trusted opinions matter more than ever
    • 03/16/18
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global
    • English

    In a fast-moving marketplace, trusted opinions matter more than ever

    We all know them: people who we instinctively feel we can turn to for advice on a particular topic, or in some cases pretty much any topic. We trust them, we value their advice and we’re likely to act on their recommendations. In a world where consumers are more able to filter out advertising than ever before (with, for example, over half of respondents in a US survey reporting using ad-blockers online), and are bombarded with information and opinions from all sides, identifying these influential citizens and getting them on your side is more important than ever. It’s also crucial to keep up with the ways in which peer-to-peer influence is evolving.

    This is a topic that GfK Consumer Life (and its earlier incarnations) has been researching for many years now. It was back in the 1940s that Elmo Roper in the US undertook pioneering work for Standard Oil to identify what he termed The Influentials – the one American in ten who told the other nine how to vote, where to eat and what to buy. In those days, there was very much a social and political slant to the group, and activities that defined them included writing to an elected representative and attending public meetings. Over the years, the group gradually became more consumption focused, with the introduction of category Influentials. These groups had a particular interest in categories like automobiles, food, and healthcare.

    Understanding today’s influencers

    Back at the start of this decade, we observed that, thanks to the power of peer reviewing and social media, it was possible for anyone to be an influencer, or at least to share their opinion with the masses. Still, however, it was necessary for consumers to figure out who they could really trust from the mass of opinions being spewed around the world wide web. Perhaps as a reaction against this, we’ve seen consumers in some parts of the world become more circumspect in this regard.

     

    For instance, the percentage who express interest in other people’s opinions about what products and services to buy has fallen since 2011 in a number of mature markets around the world, including Canada, the US and most of Western Europe, according to the GfK Consumer Life annual survey of global consumer attitudes and behaviors. This could be a reflection of the realization that some of the opinions out there are less trustworthy than others. Then there’s the problem of “fake news”, which was highlighted starkly here in the UK late last year when a journalist was able to trick TripAdvisor into making his garden shed the top-rated restaurant in London. At the same time, the proportion of global consumers who often feel overwhelmed with information when making a large purchase has grown from 21% in 2012 to 30% today.

    Trusted opinions consumers can rely on

    If anything, stories such as this show that it’s more valuable than ever for consumers to be able to find trusted opinions and advice they can rely on. The latest evolution of this concept is the Leading-Edge Consumers model used by GfK. This segment is defined by factors including category passion and early adoption, as well as being influential. Understanding this group, and what makes them tick, can be a powerful tool in today’s marketing world, where brand ambassadors and promoters are highly prized.

    There are numerous examples of brands and companies in many sectors who have successfully leveraged the power of influencers on social media. Fashion and beauty brands, both traditional and up-and-coming indie players, find Instagram a rich seam to mine. And the huge following of younger influencers’ “unboxing” videos on YouTube led to the launch of one of last year’s hottest toys, the L.O.L. Surprise. Understanding Leading Edge consumers can help you harness the full potential of the power of consumer influence. Whether it’s talking over the garden fence to a neighbor, or reading the thoughts of someone on the other side of the world, there’s still a high value placed on a trusted voice.

    David Crosbie is a Director on the Consumer Life team at GfK. He can be reached at david.crosbie@gfk.com.

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  • Map of the Month: Mesh blocks and 4-digit postcodes in Sydney
    • 03/08/18
    • Geomarketing
    • Geodata
    • Digital Maps
    • Digital Maps
    • Global
    • English

    Map of the Month: Mesh blocks and 4-digit postcodes in Sydney

    GfK's Map of the Month for March shows an excerpt of Australia's current mesh block and 4-digit postcode boundaries in Sydney.

  • Measurement for a customer-centric and multichannel world 
    • 03/02/18
    • Health
    • Global
    • English

    Measurement for a customer-centric and multichannel world 

    Join us on March 8th for a 45-minute webinar. Follow along as our brand experts outline four steps you can take to adjust measurements in response to a new multichannel world

  • Mild slowdown of consumer euphoria in Germany
    • 02/28/18
    • Press
    • Global
    • English

    Mild slowdown of consumer euphoria in Germany

    After an illustrious start to the year in the previous month, the consumer climate in Germany is facing initial headwinds. 

  • UK Consumer Confidence drops one point in February to -10
    • 02/28/18
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Consumer Goods
    • Global
    • English

    UK Consumer Confidence drops one point in February to -10

    Overall Index Score has bounced between zero and -13 since February 2016

  • Twenty districts comprise one-fourth of Germany's stationary retail turnover
    • 02/27/18
    • Press
    • Retail
    • Geomarketing
    • Geodata
    • Global
    • English

    Twenty districts comprise one-fourth of Germany's stationary retail turnover

    GfK's latest prognosis of regional retail turnover in 2018 shows promising conditions for retail locations not just in Germany's most populous metropolises, but also in several mid-sized cities.

  • The case for micro-generations: An Xennial takes on Gen X
    • 02/26/18
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global
    • English

    The case for micro-generations: An Xennial takes on Gen X

    I was born in 1981, after the malaise of the 70’s that produced Gen X, but before the tech boom of the early 90’s that shaped Millennials. Marketers would consider me the M-word, but I never really felt all too Millennial. So I finally felt like I had a generational home once marketers started talking about a new micro-generation called Xennials.

    My colleague Rachel Bonsignore wrote a great piece on the viability of Xennials a few weeks ago. In fact, Merriam-Webster has included Xennials as one of the words they are watching for eventual inclusion in their dictionary. Her insights got the Consumer Life team thinking more about identifying other insights within generations. With that in mind, and in the name of science, I set my data lasers squarely onto my generational older sibling – Generation X. Indeed, an examination of Gen X (~40-53 years old) reveals many similarities across this 15-year band (well-done generational researchers, Gen X can stay). However, digging into the youngest of Gen X (age 40-44) does show some interesting differences when compared to slightly older Xers (age 45-50).

    An illustrative example: Personal values of younger Xers vs. older Xers

    Using GfK’s Consumer Life database, we looked at the personal values orientation of Generation X. Our analysis revealed that younger Xers tend to fall more into a personal values segment called “Achievers,” who are focused on material wealth and getting ahead in life. In contrast, older Xers are more likely to fall into the “Traditionalists” segment, made up of those who are more likely to value faith, tradition, and respecting ancestors.

    These differences in personal values orientations are important cues that marketers use for innovation and communication strategy.  For example, an Achiever will respond to messages that speak to success, wealth, and hard work. Traditionalists, on the other hand, will respond to communication themes like time-honored and heritage. These types of variances highlight the need for nuance when conducting generational research – especially in the age of big data and micro targeting.

    What do micro-generational insights mean for our work as marketers?

    Of course, a few data runs on Gen X does not a new microgeneration make, but it does mean that we need to use nuance when we think about targeting via generational insights. We can certainly continue to think broadly about a generation in 15-20 year bands, but it is also important to consider smaller age bands, life stage, and other demographic markers like income and education. In our work at GfK Consumer Life, we repeatedly uncover differences between younger and older millennials, for example, mainly due to drastic differences in their experiences with technology and the economy.

    So, in your next generational project remember to look for the nuance and think critically about how your larger generational target may differ within itself. It will result in more fine-tuned innovation and communication strategies.

    Tim Kenyon is a Vice President on the Consumer Life team at GfK. He can be reached at tim.kenyon@gfk.com.

  • European optics market confirms a market size of €17.6 billion for 2017
    • 02/26/18
    • Global
    • English

    European optics market confirms a market size of €17.6 billion for 2017

    GfK announced the latest figures at MIDO 2018 exhibition 

  • Exploring new opportunities from emerging trends in the healthcare market and beyond
    • 02/23/18
    • Health
    • Technology
    • Global
    • English

    Exploring new opportunities from emerging trends in the healthcare market and beyond

    In January, GfK Russia organized a foresight session for clients and members of the healthcare research department. Its focus was the exploration of new trends in both the healthcare market in general and in the market research area in particular – and what the implications were for the future.

    Modern life brings new innovations and poses new challenges, requiring new solutions

    Digital technologies are apparent in all spheres of our life and have become a day-to-day reality. In the healthcare industry, we are seeing rapid digitalization and resulting opportunities provided by the development of telemedicine – which makes it possible for every patient from wherever they are to receive medical treatment remotely. We predict that in the future the primary diagnostics for patients will be done remotely with the help of artificial intelligence. Patients may then be referred to well-qualified medical specialists for online consultation. Thus, the primary tier of healthcare will experience significant changes. Considering the eventual increase of automation in primary care, the need for more GPs will be greater, and patients with mild medical conditions will be assisted by artificial intelligence. Most likely, there will be regulatory structures, which will considerably affect doctors’ medical protocol by ensuring they are in compliance with new regulations.

    The development of digital technologies and their integration into the pharmaceutical market will have a significant effect

    First, the market will change – the advent of electronic prescriptions and electronic pharmacies will alter the essence of the existing retail network and the distribution of medical supplies. It may even be that programmable drones will be delivering medicines to patients. We may also see a boost in the sphere of biotechnology and the development of a new generation of evolutionary medicines.

    There’s no doubt that life expectancy will continue to rise steadily, and the length of an active life will expand as well. This will lead to a larger cluster of people who are active over 50+ years. This group will present big purchasing opportunities and at the same time put pressure on the health industry to meet their demands, thus influencing and adding promise to the future of the healthcare industry.

    Disease prevention and the ability to maintain active longevity in this age category will be at the forefront of innovation

    Changes in the healthcare industry will also require reconfiguration in the work that research agencies do – clients’ requests will be evolving, requiring that agencies be ready to meet those changing demands with relevance and timeliness. Research will need to be more flexible and quick, but at the same time offer more profound and expert insights. The era of hundred-page reports is over; they are being replaced by brief, infographics-rich deliverables that give clear solutions to the business objectives set forth by the client.

    The next stage of market research development would be the adoption of meta-analysis in order to obtain new knowledge based on the integration of results of various research. At the same time, implementation of chatbots will ensure an efficient usage of the data and knowledge collected during previous studies. Additionally, thanks to chatbots, clients will have easy access to the data gathered during research and in case any questions arise, they will be referred to the bot to get an answer in real time. Using the database will make it possible to generate answers to clients’ questions with minimum delays.

    Certainly new research methods, including neuroethologies, will be developed. For example, panelists would wear special chips, which would record not only the purchase of a product but also the product’s effectiveness for each individual patient at the physiological and patient compliance level. Such data will be useful for pharmaceutical companies.

    Thus, the image of the future research agency is an institution that possesses high-tech solutions and expert consultants who are dedicated to addressing business objectives together with the client – a paradigm of equal partnership and interaction.

    For a more in-depth journey into the future of healthcare market research and to discuss predictive solutions for your business, let’s begin the dialogue.

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