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  • Map of the Month: Fashion’s share of retail turnover, Europe 2017
    • 05/24/18
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Retail
    • Geomarketing
    • Geodata
    • Picture of the month
    • Global
    • English

    Map of the Month: Fashion’s share of retail turnover, Europe 2017

    The fashion segment enjoyed a 13.5% share of the EU-28's total stationary retail turnover in 2017.

  • Slight decline in consumer climate in Germany
    • 05/24/18
    • Retail
    • Consumer Goods
    • Global
    • English

    Slight decline in consumer climate in Germany

    Findings of the GfK Consumer Climate Study for May 2018

  • Intellus Philadelphia 2018: A report from the inaugural conference
    • 05/22/18
    • Health
    • Global
    • English

    Intellus Philadelphia 2018: A report from the inaugural conference

    A fresh angle on customer centricity… featuring empathy and deep understanding.

    At Intellus in Philadelphia this May, the PMRG and PBIRG attendees focused almost exclusively on patients, offering an even deeper understanding of patients’ needs, their varied contexts and their experience as participants in research. The conference was an hour-by-hour reminder of the reason why we are in this business: our patients. And they were featured prominently in keynote addresses and discussion groups. A new “demo zone” featured bite-sized vignettes of technology and analytics that apply to patient/caregiver feedback, with many having clear application to physicians and payers as well.

    What it takes to put patients at the center

    It is easy to talk about putting patients at the center. Intellus actually did it. The main sessions featured patients, with the “Advocacy of Hope” keynote, featuring and moderated by rare disease patient advocates (themselves either patients or caregivers). We heard the perspective of patients, as well as gained insights into the dynamics of creating and leading patient advocacy forums. Over the last three decades, we, as marketing researchers, have learned from customer-centricity success stories (many of which are non-healthcare) about what it takes to become sustainably customer centric: It requires leadership that cares about the customers. Leadership must develop true empathy and a deep understanding of their customers’ needs. While pharma companies have always cared about the patients, what is new is that they have started to place them front and center in their strategies. We had proof of this at Intellus, as we heard patients talk about their personal challenges, how their disease impacts their lives and the role that support organizations play in managing the diseases.

    Understanding patients with rare diseases

    As researchers, we also heard the perspective of rare patient advocacy leaders — information that can help us recruit rare patient populations to studies, and gleaned tips (e.g., transparency) for the best way to conduct research in their communities. We want to learn without doing damage, and the conference delegates shared tip after tip on how to do exactly that. Some delegates led a deep-dive discussion into the needs of patients with rare diseases, with a clear message on how empathy helps them harness patient panels.

    Enabling patient centricity with technology, analytics and insights

    Technology and analytics from the “demo zone” revealed new techniques, such as GfK Health’s virtual reality tool that taps System 1 reactions (Daniel Kahneman’s behavioral economics) in patient-expert interactions. Virtual reality emerged elsewhere as well, with HRW sharing results from an R&D study comparing different approaches to measuring reactions to patient profiles. Analytics ranged from dashboards mapping patient types, to social conversation dashboards, to generalized influence networks.

    What next steps need to be taken

    Pharma is focusing again on digital and customer centricity. We saw an early phase of this in 2008-2010 that included quick investments, followed by the rapid refocusing of assets. The current phase is, for at least some companies, exhibiting features of this two-pronged approach that has been proven to work. Customer centricity is focusing on the most relevant customers, including patients, as featured in Intellus, but also extending to providers and payers – with a spotlight on creating true value that will lead to the commercial success needed to fund the customer experience (CX) focus. This season’s conferences have once again pointed the world of health in the right direction. Now we will see if they follow through, and include the requirements for CX success in their initiatives.

    This article was co-authored by Cheryl Mulherin

    To share your thoughts, please email tom.hartley@gfk.com, cheryl.mulherin@gfk.com or leave a comment below.

  • Stationary retail in Europe to grow by 2.1 percent in 2018
    • 05/22/18
    • Press
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Retail
    • Consumer Goods
    • Geomarketing
    • Geodata
    • Global
    • English

    Stationary retail in Europe to grow by 2.1 percent in 2018

    GfK anticipates a 2018 nominal turnover growth of +2.1 percent for stationary retail in the 28 EU member states. But trends within the individual countries under review vary widely.

  • UK digital radio hits listening milestone: Time to turn off analogue FM or not?
    • 05/17/18
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    UK digital radio hits listening milestone: Time to turn off analogue FM or not?

    UK radio reached a significant milestone on 17 May 2018 when the RAJAR Q1 2018 listening figures were published. For the first time, over half (51%) of all weekly radio listening was via a digital platform, such as DAB (Digital Audio Broadcasting), online or through digital TV. In other words, more radio listening is now done through digital means than through analogue on FM.

    Why is this figure important?

    In 2009, the UK Government published its criteria for turning off the analogue FM signal and having only digital broadcast. Those were:

    • When 50% of listening is to digital; and
    • When national DAB coverage is comparable to FM coverage, and local DAB reaches 90% of the population and all major roads

    The Government’s intention was for these criteria to be met by the end of 2013, pushed by an industry ‘drive to digital’. Without this ‘drive to digital’, they expected digital radio listening to reach 50% organically by 2015.

    In fact, it has taken until 2018. The DAB standard for broadcasting digital audio services has been around in the UK since 1995, so one could say the 50% listening threshold has taken the UK almost 25 years to reach. Ultimately, the timetable was dictated by the listener.

     

    Although the UK has now (just) crept past this specific Government criterion, the UK has, in fact, already embraced digital radio.

    In an average week, well over half of the UK population (63%) do listen to some radio via digital means (known as ‘weekly reach’) – and our GfK data show that DAB radio set sales have declined by 26% in the last five years because most people have already replaced some or all of their analogue sets; or are listening through other digital means such as the Radioplayer app or ‘Alexa’.

    What happens now?

    Theoretically, the Government should now trigger the two-year migration process for turning off the FM signal by 2020. This feels unlikely. Both the public service (BBC) and commercial radio broadcasters prefer nothing to happen for the time being and to continue broadcasting on FM, as well as digital. This aversion to disrupting the market is felt especially in commercial radio, as they enjoy a relative buoyant period for advertising expenditure.

    The UK, and many other countries, will also be keenly observing listening trends in Norway, which underwent a digital radio switchover in 2017. Radio listening figures published so far in 2018 show an initial dip in overall listening followed by signs of a recovery. It has also benefitted the smaller and new stations to digital, who have captured around a third of all listening, and brought more choice to the Norwegian listener.

    Our forecast for the UK market: from collecting data to connecting data

    We believe that we’ll see plans put in place to gradually phase out analogue FM radio broadcasting; this is something the Swiss radio industry wants to happen in their market from 2020. This slow migration would suit a number of local stations whose share of digital radio listening is below 50% and who therefore, understandably, are not keen on losing the majority of their listening.

    This landmark digitization of radio may also provoke some movement in how radio audiences are measured. With more listening happening digitally, so the volume and granularity of listening data that can be captured increases.

    The emphasis will shift from collecting data to connecting data, such as online streaming or consumer behavior. GfK are already harnessing big (and small) datasets in several markets, such as the Measurement Innovation Program in Australia for radio, and integrating TV and online viewing in Sweden. As different markets operate at different speeds in their digitization journeys, so we recognize that media measurement needs to be tailored accordingly to maximize the value of the audience data to the stakeholders.

    Whether the FM signal gets turned off or not in the short term, this is a moment for celebration for the UK radio industry and for Digital Britain, and opens up exciting new opportunities for radio stations, for radio audience measurement and, most importantly, for the radio listener.

    John Carroll is Global Director Business Development, Media Measurement at GfK (@MediaCarroll)

  • Gamers often run counter to stereotypes: Here’s what you need to know about them
    • 05/15/18
    • Technology
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global
    • English

    Gamers often run counter to stereotypes: Here’s what you need to know about them

    “That was close… watch out!” That was my husband, his eyes fixated on his 32-inch UHD monitor as he coordinated with his squad mates over the microphone-equipped headset to escape death in the massively popular online game Fortnite. The excitement over live actions was palpable, contagious even for me who never really got into multi-player online games or computer games for that matter. My first-hand gaming experience is largely limited to playing Luminosity on my iPhone, for now.

    One way or another, electronic gaming has become an important part of the leisure time for many of us. According to the latest data from GfK Consumer Life, about three in ten online Americans age 15+ now play electronic or video games daily or on most days, up from less than a quarter in 2009. Another 22% do so weekly, and one-tenth play monthly. Younger men remain the most engaged with gaming – nearly six in ten daily gamers are men and the majority (55%) are Millennials or Post-Millennial teens; but women and older Americans have also come to claim a notable share of the pie.

    Contributing to the growing popularity of gaming is a more flexible, engaging, and multi-dimensional experience. Take Fortnite. You have the option to play on gaming consoles, computers, and starting in March this year, iOS mobile devices. You can not only play the game but watch the gameplay live while interacting with the broadcasting player in real-time. In fact, on March 25th, a global Fortnite match orchestrated by popular Spanish YouTuber elrubiusOMG drew in a record of 1.1 million concurrent viewers, shattering the previous record set less than two weeks before on game streaming site Twitch by pro-gamer Ninja and hip-hop icon Drake. The three-and-a-half hour tournament racked up an astonishing total of 42 million views for the entire duration. And it does not stop there. The first Fortnite eSports tournament took place this April in Las Vegas, where hundreds of fans, semi-pros and pro-gamers from all over the country played against Ninja and each other. The riveting event has been hailed as adding a welcome new dimension to the rapidly growing eSports market by allowing casual gamers to not only observe but play alongside pro-gamers.

    Gamers represent an enticing target group for marketers for reasons beyond their sheer size and the rise of eSports or streaming platforms like Twitch and YouTube Gaming. GfK Consumer Life findings reveal a few key facts about gamers that marketers need to know.

    • Willing to spend: PC gamers, often swearing by the platform for its superiority in graphics, processing power and selection of games, have been fueling the upsurge of gaming PCs even as the overall PC market faced challenges in recent years, motivating computer manufacturers from HP to Dell to boost up their gamer-focused offerings.Gamers’ openness to spend, however, goes well beyond gaming devices or even electronics overall, which these tech enthusiasts are naturally drawn to. With a high level of consumer confidence and often in the acquisition stage of life, gamers – particularly daily and weekly gamers – are substantially more inclined than the rest to plan for large purchases including vehicles, homes and home appliances.
    • Social and influential: That image you may picture when thinking of a hardcore gamer – an isolated “geek” with no social life spending most of his time playing games alone – is far from the reality. Gamers today are among the most social – for example, daily gamers are highly engaged with social media. And many feel that belonging to the groups that share their interest is essential to their wellbeing. After all, with the rise of online multiplayer and social network games, gaming today is often an intensely social experience and gamers are more likely a virtually connected bunch. But gamers’ social experience is by no means limited to teaming up with their gaming buddies to battle for glory in the virtual world. On average, daily gamers spend over an hour more than the rest per week hanging out with friends around town.

    With a broader network and a willingness to connect, gamers are influential. Daily and weekly gamers show a high tendency to make product recommendations to various types of people – from those who share their hobbies and interest to perfect strangers they simply run into at stores. And the majority have posted online reviews in the past month.

    • Beyond function: Gamification is a way of life for devoted gamers. Out of a list of 57 personal values that GfK Consumer Life measures, Having Fun and Excitement are the most differentiating for those who play electronic games at least weekly. And this focus on fun is reflected in their product expectations. Compared to the average American consumer, daily and weekly gamers are more likely to seek out fun and novelty in everyday products and admit that the look, feel and smell of a product is very important to them.
    • Beyond fun: Fun-seeking they may be, the typical gamer today is NOT a laid-back free-spirit only concerned about having a good time. Often Millennials and Post-Millennials trying to establish themselves at work and in life in general, daily and weekly gamers demonstrate a high propensity to fall into the Achievers values segment, a group that prioritizes on getting ahead and obtaining social status. Part of that status comes from being ‘in the know.’ Gamers, especially daily gamers, often want to be seen as knowledgeable and smart. This points to opportunities for not just products that entertain but those that inform and enable productivity.

    While intended for a broader audience, the commercial ‘open your eyes’ for the freshly released Oculus Go – Facebook’s first standalone virtual reality (VR) headset hyped to finally take VR beyond the niche – may actually resonate particularly well with gamers by promoting enrichment through ‘living every story” and learning to “love a life different from your own.’

    In conclusion, gamers – the newfound darling of many marketers across categories – deserve the attention. But stereotypes don’t always apply. To resonate with this group, think enabling fun but also function, and personal achievement but also social connections.

    Veronica Chen is a Vice President on the Consumer Life team at GfK. She can be reached at Veronica.chen@gfk.com

  • Smartphone shopping in Indonesia
    • 05/09/18
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    Smartphone shopping in Indonesia

    Smartphone shopping in Indonesia

    Indonesia is a growing market, which offers huge opportunities for consumer brands, tech and media companies. With over 250 million inhabitants, it is the world’s fourth most populous country and has millions of people rising into the middle class each year. Much of its internet access is smartphone-based, which makes it a lucrative market to study online mobile behavior.

    We run regular research looking at device use and online behavior in 14 countries. This is passively collected behavioral data, which creates an easy-to-use round-up of the cross-media metrics that matter. In this blog, we share some of the top trends in Indonesia.

    Indonesia smartphone users spent an average of 96 minutes on their handheld device per day during 2017. That is higher than UK, Germany, Poland, Russia, Brazil, Mexico or Spain. This usage is also growing – we measured a 15% rise in smartphone minutes across the year. This rapid growth of smartphone adoption has already been reported in publications such as Telegraph and Techcrunch.

    Smartphone use

    So how are Indonesians using their smartphone? By comparing minutes used per day across key categories, we can create a “share of clock” for smartphone use.

    Across the top five web categories, Indonesian smartphone users spent an average of 6.4 minutes per day on shopping sites during 2017. This figure is relatively high in Indonesia compared with other markets in keeping with growing smartphone use. Usage grew across the year, from around 6 minutes in the first 6 months to just under 7 minutes for the second half of the year. This is a key metric to watch in order to evaluate potential growth and assess season fluctuations. For example, shopping time grew to 7.5 minutes per day for Dec 2017.

     

    Shopping related websites also have one of the highest reach figures. An average of 92% of Indonesian smartphone users access shopping sites on a month-to-month basis versus other categories. So while players may spend more time per day on Gaming sites, for example, at 13.3 minutes the number who do so is around a third less at 62%.

     

    Almost 60% of Indonesian smartphone users visited online shopping sites 10 or more days per month and around a third (32.8%) visited shopping sites 20 days or more per month. The frequent visitation of these sites provides marketers with a great opportunity to engage with shoppers on a regular basis.

     


    Top 10 shopping sites or apps

    Drilling down to look at the most popular (defined by reach) shopping sites visited, Google Playstore leads the pack with (92%) followed by more local eCommerce sites Blibli and Lazada. Lazada seems to be benefitting from Alibaba’s investment and growth plans in Southeast Asia. Already we can see local sites competing strongly with global brands. Apps/sites such as Grab and Go-Jek, offering similar services to Uber are very popular. Google has started investing in Go-Jek, which in addition to taxis and motorbikes, also offers services like grocery delivery. Uber has dropped out of the Top 10 (although it was a top 10 player in January 2017) with Grab acquiring the company for its Southeast Asian operations earlier this year.

     

    Given the large amount of time Indonesian smartphone users spend each day on communication (32.6 minutes) and social networking (24 minutes) there is huge potential to create potential shopping opportunities. By using the latest online data measurement, we can help brands better understand the purchase journey of today’s mobile-first consumers and convert those clicks to sales.

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    About the data

    GfK has developed digital behavioral panels in 14 markets around the world. Panellists allow us to passively follow their digital behavior across their devices – desktop, tablets and smartphones – in order to explore patterns of behavior. The Crossmedia Visualizer tool enables clients to mine the information collected within these panels to develop a view into how consumers are spending their time online. This provides insights into creating strategies to further engage and connect with these consumers.

    For this analysis, we focused on data from Indonesian smartphone users and how they spend their time online for January to December 2017.

    For a broader snapshot of device use for January 2018 please download our free sample report.across 8 diverse markets: Germany, Mexico, UK, Poland, Russia, Indonesia, Brazil and Netherlands.

     

     

  • Wireless audio equipment still highly demanded in Germany
    • 05/09/18
    • Technology
    • Global
    • English

    Wireless audio equipment still highly demanded in Germany

    GfK's findings on the German audio market

  • eyeforpharma Philadelphia 2018: A delegate’s perspective
    • 05/08/18
    • Health
    • Global
    • English

    eyeforpharma Philadelphia 2018: A delegate’s perspective

    Patient Centricity is not new…but with so many willing partners for pharma, who is the right one to help leverage the full power of patient centricity?

    At eyeforpharma in Philadelphia this April, the theme was “Know your patient. Deliver real value.” The concept of patient centricity is not novel, but it may be harder than we thought to leverage its inherent power and “deliver real value.” While pharma is making headway, there is a realization that it will take longer to accomplish, and it is a multifaceted venture that requires many partners. In a survey of over 1,200 industry players, 91% said patient centricity is important, but only 30% feel they are confident that they can make it happen. Technology, AI, machine learning, strong payer strategies and medical affairs will all need to work in concert to drive patient centricity, to improve patient care and shorten the benefit approval process.

    Science and innovation does not seem to be the problem – alignment is!

    The science of medicine continues to evolve at a rapid pace, creating new targeted drugs that focus on specific patient types (examples include Hep C, CAR-T and others), leading to higher life expectancy. However, what is missing is the drive to truly move the patient into the center of our universe, using the patient as a starting point rather than an afterthought. There was widespread consensus that there needs to be a major change around the corporate culture/mindset, alignment with managed care, regulatory challenges and slow R+D drug development processes. Are there lessons to be learned from other industries that have put the consumer first?

    When building a patient-centric model, the devil is in the details!

    Several companies talked about how they have put patients first, and an honest assessment of the current situation is almost always a good starting point:

    • Look within your company and examine its culture.
    • Engage with patient authentically and often.
    • Learn from other industries particularly tech (Amazon experience).
    • Deliver on patient promises.
    • Use data smartly and judiciously (big data does not always mean better data).
    • Help patients be self-reliant – allow them to guide us and help connect pharma with their lives.

    Where do we go from here?

    Pharma is betting big on digital transformation for the industry, but technology will not be enough. What is needed most of all is a change in mindset and culture, beginning with leadership. As multichannel marketing continues to become more and more relevant, placing the patient at the center of these marketing efforts, and truly designing programs and touchpoints to understand the patient perspective, will drive success. The pharma industry is at an important inflection point – it has always understood the importance of patients, but now it’s time to leverage data and technology resources to truly position patients as the fulcrum around which it will pivot and build the brands of the future. The next few years will determine whether we got it right.

    To share your thoughts, email pankaj.thapar@gfk.com or leave a comment below.

  • How is the VR industry developing?
    • 04/27/18
    • Technology
    • Global
    • English

    05/17/18 - 05/18/18
    How is the VR industry developing?

    Join us at this year´s VRX Europe in Amsterdam from May 17-18 to hear GfK speak about the latest market trends in VR. 

  • UK Consumer Confidence drops two points to -9 in April
    • 04/27/18
    • Financial Services
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Consumer Goods
    • FMCG
    • Global
    • English

    UK Consumer Confidence drops two points to -9 in April

    GfK’s long-running Consumer Confidence Index decreased two points in April 2018. Four of the five measures were lower, with the remaining measure increasing.

  • Insecurity causes the consumer climate in Germany to dip slightly
    • 04/26/18
    • Press
    • Global
    • English

    Insecurity causes the consumer climate in Germany to dip slightly

    Findings of the GfK Consumer Climate Study for April 2018

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