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  • Assessing fresh pasta concepts for the US market
    • 09/05/17
    • Consumer Goods
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Global
    • English

    Assessing fresh pasta concepts for the US market

    We helped a multinational FMCG company optimize two new product ideas for an existing pasta brand.

  • Engage financial services consumers with instant access to GfK's FRS consumer segments
    • 09/05/17
    • Financial Services
    • Global
    • English

    Engage financial services consumers with instant access to GfK's FRS consumer segments

    GfK has released a portfolio of financial segments from its industry-leading Financial Research Survey (FRS).

    • 09/05/17
    • Technology
    • Global
    • English

    Smarter living with 5G, but what about the data?

    For years, we’ve been hearing about the Internet of Things (IoT). Up till now, it has always been some distant reality featuring self-driving cars, drone-delivery, Smart TVs, AI-powered personal assistants and a fridge that stocks itself when the milk runs out.

    Not anymore. With 5G networks on the horizon, it’s only a matter of time before the IoT becomes a part of our everyday lives. Why is that so? Unlike today’s 4G networks, the next-generation 5G mobile networks are expected to be up and running by 2020, will have high bandwidth, low latency, and are virtually lag-free. This means that the networks will be able to seamlessly support the flood of affordable, simple devices that will be brought online.

    5G in Asia

    Asia might have adopted both 3G and 4G far later than the West, but with 5G, the third time just might be the charm. According to an Ericsson Mobility Report, Asia Pacific (along with North America) is poised to lead 5G adoption, making smart homes an imminent reality. In fact, The Visionaire, a 632-unit executive condominium in Singapore was marketed earlier this year as one of the first smart homes in the city-state.

    Global management consulting firm A.T. Kearney reports that Asia’s smart home market is expected to reach US$115 million in 2030, with growth driven by China and Japan and with highly-connected economies such as Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan also playing a key role.

    New growth opportunities with 5G

    3G gave us video streaming, while 4G perfected the sharing economy. As with every generation of network upgrades, new growth opportunities will present themselves. IoT devices will generate huge amounts of data, driving tremendous opportunities for data analytics across industries.

    From a commercial standpoint, with access to IoT data, brands can enjoy greater understanding of how consumers leverage technology, enabling them to provide consumers with exactly what they want, thus maximising profits and heightening brand loyalty. Brands are also equipped to make business decisions to narrow gaps in the market and improve customer experiences.

    We believe that data mining will be the new gold in the era of IoT – and telcos stand to benefit the most. By tapping into vast swathes of data generated by IoT, telcos will gain access to invaluable customer insights, which often make up the basis of lucrative partnerships with other businesses. Constant connectivity offers the chance for telcos to boost their revenue streams through machine-to-machine communications, easy payment systems and networking for the IoT. As such, it will enable them to extend their customer base to include utilities, industrial supply chains, smart homes and smart cities, among many others.

    Benefits for Retail

    Retailers also stand to benefit as they can use the information to develop new service-oriented business models that will better serve both consumers and businesses alike. Currently, customers are already able to receive highly specific mobile offers based on both their location and consumption habits. With the IoT transforming even more objects into customer touch points, the possibilities are endless – such as by solving supply chain constraints and improving inventory management.

    In a landscape saturated with information, brands require data analytics to make sense of customer data and answer questions like – how and why do customers consume apps, how is the total data market growing, and what are the opportunities for innovation with 5G.

    Understanding each consumer

    Today, some brands are already working in tandem with market research agencies to evaluate consumer data accurately in order to identify and build a roadmap of innovative possibilities to deliver value to consumers.

    As we step into the world of 5G and IoT, we are bound to be exposed to data overload, which makes data analysis a more critical aspect for brands now than before. From usage patterns, behaviours, preferences to experience, through advanced matching and modelling techniques, every data point can be thoroughly analysed, enabling brands to understand each consumer completely. By leveraging these extensive data insights based on research intelligence, brands can make informed business decisions, benefiting their core audiences.

    Undeniably, the IoT can revolutionize the way we live, work and play while making businesses more efficient and convenient. It’s high time now for businesses to embrace the potential of IoT or risk being left behind.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • GfK strengthens its Asia-Pacific and Southern European regions by appointing new General Managers
    • 09/01/17
    • Press
    • Global
    • English

    GfK strengthens its Asia-Pacific and Southern European regions by appointing new General Managers

    Cheong Tai will lead GfK’s Asia-Pacific business, Margret Schuit will be responsible for GfK’s activities in Southern Europe.

    • 09/01/17
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Technology
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    Researching the mind of a ‘distracted viewer’: The greater than ever role of engagement and the gains of AI

    The rules of engagement have modernized. There is no question that – for a while now- we’ve been living in the era of the ‘distracted viewer’. If anything, the re-invention of TV over the last decade should have spawned a more appreciative and engaged consumer. Firstly, content on the small screen has re-emerged as innovative, surprising, ‘wonder what comes next’ claiming, it feels, some of the old cinema aura. Secondly, more money than ever before is now spent on commissioning and acquiring content for the general TV; Netflix, Amazon and HBO announced they are spending, as a total, more than $12 billion dollars on content this year

    Instead, the abundance of shows to choose from combined with the plethora of devices demanding our attention have turned us consumers into the toughest of judges on a talent show at any given time. And I will explain why; whether we are streaming or still enjoying the traditional TV, viewing is rarely a single action. Online browsing, social networking, instant messaging or just good old phone ringing come in the way of a viewing experience. Unless we make a conscious decision to remain uncontactable during a viewing session, pop up alerts will be fighting for our attention throughout repeatedly asking us to make a choice as to whether the content we watch is worth interrupting; our engagement will be undoubtedly tested.

    Engagement through emotion

    So, what is it in a programme that keeps us engaged? For many decades, creatives globally (with the help of their insight teams) have been attempting to solve the engagement question, which more often than not is synonymous with international appeal and longevity of a show in the viewers’ hearts. Figuring out that emotions are some of the main drivers of engagement is almost straightforward. Deciding which are the lead emotions and how to track them is trickier.

    In market research, emotions are captured in numerous and cross methodology ways: from using words/emojis/open questions in quantitative surveys to having ‘emotional’ qualitative group discussions and in depth one-to-one interviews to using dial testing, heart rate tracking and machine learning algorithms like facial expression capturing and voice recognition, all used to define the emotional connection between the viewers and a new programme. But, in all honestly, creatives have been taking the lead on this one, not necessarily with the fine-tooth comb of emotions, rather with gut feeling and their years of experience taking centre stage in this decision making. Sometimes the audience choices will contradict these decisions. The most striking example of a success that was failed to spot is ‘Mad Men’; it was rejected by both HBO and Showtime before AMC decided to take a punt with it. Same with C.S.I. which was consciously overlooked by ABC, NBC and Fox and it was only the CBS executives who decided to take a chance with it. 17 years after it first launched, it continues to be the bread and butter of many schedules around the world.

    Measuring audience emotions

    So, what’s so important about emotions that can predict a show’s appeal? The answer sits somewhere between neuroscience and psychology. Think about a movie scene that increased your heart beat, made you start biting your nails again, stand up or even scream. At that particular moment, you were biometrically experiencing what was happening in the movie world, fully empathising with the feelings of the character. If then or immediately after you were asked a pure and undiluted research question like: ‘what did you think?’, any emotions would be decoded in your answer. GfK Voice allows us to do exactly that, ie. capture audiences’ emotions and their sense of engagement by translating people’s voice response to quantifiable data.

    Analyzing the ‘distracted viewer’

    Once emotions subside, people start rationalizing what they’ve experienced. Referring to that movie scene again here, if it’s memorable and worth pondering, thoughts will start coming in. Emotions will give place to reasoning and our ‘distracted viewer’ will engage in chats, tweets, will write reviews, share comments on social media and even reply to surveys offering well-thought, moulded answers. The key to unlocking the essence from all this unstructured text is artificial intelligence (A.I.). The text mining process that analyses transcripts, unlocks themes, detects how formal, informal or emotive writing is, is what we call Advanced Text Analytics. This automated process of examining text delves deep into the context behind engagement recreating the consumer’s mind.

    The combination of emotional decoding and artificial intelligence can shine the brightest light on the consumer’s mind and produce powerful diagnostic as well as predictive results. Engagement might be constantly tested with distractions all around us and machine learning technologies define exactly how much that is. However, in this world of distractions, the abundance of platforms consumers use to express themselves unveils the deepest insights that are often the hardest to get. And this is where A.I. benefits the most.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • GfK to sharpen customer focus and accelerate digitization with a comprehensive transformation and investment program
    • 08/31/17
    • Press
    • Global
    • English

    GfK to sharpen customer focus and accelerate digitization with a comprehensive transformation and investment program

    The Management Board and Supervisory Board of GfK SE have approved a comprehensive transformation and investment program that will enable GfK to get back on a sustainable growth path.

  • Smart TVs gaining ground
    • 08/30/17
    • Press
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Point of Sales Tracking
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global
    • English

    Smart TVs gaining ground

    GfK findings for the global TV market on the occasion of IFA 2017 in Berlin.

    • 08/30/17
    • Global
    • English

    How market research is staying relevant in the digital ecosystem

    Leading our Customer and Audience Activation unit, Niko Waesche sat down with Eyeota in Cannes to discuss the market research industry and the role it plays in the digital ecosystem. The original interview is published here.

    Q: What are the biggest challenges you are seeing in the market research industry today?

    Niko: Market research needs to adapt to a world in which more and more data is available via digital sources. What seems a threat is also a huge opportunity. While at first glance there seems to be an overflow of data available about consumers, on closer inspection there are gaps and challenges. For one, the world is not a rich data lake, it is more like a giant Swiss cheese with lots of gaping data holes. It is important to note that data must be obtained legitimately and comply with privacy standards – as some of the data that is readily available is actually toxic.

    And how do you make use of all this data? How do you accurately combine data from a number of separate sources and how can valuable insights be generated from this abundance of information?

    Finally, market research has a huge role to play in linking the “what” of digitally sourced data to the “why” of consumer behavior. We use a portfolio of tools to more fully understand brand experience across all user touchpoints in order to gain a full 360 degree view of the consumer.  Ultimately consumers are human, not a series of data points.

    Q: How can market research companies stay relevant?

    Niko: We will not stay relevant by continuing to do only what we have been doing for the past 20 years.

    The opportunity for the market research industry is to use our position as a trusted ecosystem partner to support our clients in evaluating, combining and synthesizing data sets and transforming these into valuable and actionable insights. And we need our services to be scalable, integrated and fast. This is a journey; nobody in the industry is there yet. Working closely with a global activation platform like Eyeota is one of the ways we are accelerating this process.

    Our message to our clients is that we recommend that they look at the business model of their data partners. You’re going to get insights from us that some of your other partners won’t be able give you because they’re in a different type of business. We’re focused purely on the business of helping our clients make better decisions and get better insights and better data.

    Q: How would you describe the role of market research data in the digital ecosystem?

    Niko: A couple of years ago, most of what we did was offline, like booking travel in an agency on the high street. Does anybody remember that? Today, we are living in a hybrid world; there still is a significant offline component in many things we do as consumers.

    Think of market research companies as your partners for bringing both these worlds together to provide a holistic, comprehensive view of the consumer. Using GfK as an example, we have point of sale data for durable and electronics purchases in 80 countries, sourced from more than 400,000 retailers. In some of the world’s largest consumer markets, we can link media behavior, including TV viewing and Facebook in-app ad exposures, to store purchases. FMCG companies love this data because it helps them understand the full customer journey, not only the last click.

    Q: Where do you see the role of digital data heading?

    Niko: Eventually, through the Internet of Things and other developments, there will probably be a near 100% overlap between the online and offline worlds. For instance, a car we sit in will automatically be online, feeding driving data to enable mobility services. In addition, take the recent news of Amazon’s purchase of Whole Foods – anything you buy in Whole Foods will be part of the Amazon universe.

    Even where there’s a near 100% overlap, the market research industry will still have a role because we to put the data together in a smart way that delivers understanding. We’re trying to build this fabric of smartness right now—calibration, data science, filling the gaps—that’s what we’re about.

    Q: One of the most urgent topics today is the use of bad, inaccurate data. What can agencies do to ensure they’re always using the best quality data?

    Niko: There is data that is just simply bad and there is good data that is used wrongly. Finally, there is good data used in the right way.

    There has been a lot of attention around bot data. Using data that is generated by bots is going to lead you astray, obviously, because it’s wrong data, it’s not human data.

    Sometimes businesses are trying to make the data do things that it simply cannot do. What we do to address this is to check which data sets correlate and which don’t. For example, regarding certain financial characteristics, purchase power or likelihood to use certain financial products, is often more closely correlated with aggregated postal codes than with digital media behavior. For this reason, we are activating our GfK FRS financial segments in the UK on the Eyeota audience platform, which specializes in linking special data sets like aggregated postal codes.

    The fact that Eyeota has the ability to link to postal code data—and because it’s aggregated data, we’re not dealing with personally identifiable information—makes it a robust platform on which to map to our financial segments.

    Niko Waesche will be joined by Kristina Prokop (EVP, Global Platforms, Eyeota) at dmexco, Sep 14, to answer your questions regarding online data activation.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Record global demand for smartphones and wearables in first half 2017
    • 08/30/17
    • Press
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Point of Sales Tracking
    • Global
    • English

    Record global demand for smartphones and wearables in first half 2017

    GfK findings for the global telecom market on the occasion of IFA 2017 in Berlin.

  • PC Gaming still on the rise
    • 08/30/17
    • Press
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Point of Sales Tracking
    • Global
    • English

    PC Gaming still on the rise

    GfK findings for the global PC gaming hardware market on the occasion of IFA 2017 in Berlin.

  • Bluetooth and multiroom are still trending
    • 08/30/17
    • Press
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Point of Sales Tracking
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global
    • English

    Bluetooth and multiroom are still trending

    GfK findings for the global audio market on the occasion of IFA 2017 in Berlin.

  • Small domestic appliances: Trending to convenience, health and connectivity
    • 08/30/17
    • Press
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Point of Sales Tracking
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global
    • English

    Small domestic appliances: Trending to convenience, health and connectivity

    GfK findings for the global small domestic appliances market on the occasion of IFA 2017 in Berlin.

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