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    • 06/05/17
    • Health
    • Technology
    • Global
    • English

    How consumer research innovations can help boost health intelligence

    There is nothing wrong with proven market research methodologies. For many years crucial business decisions in healthcare have been made based on input gathered from seemingly straightforward ATUs and brand tracking, online surveys and face-to-face interactions. And we do not envisage this will change. Going “all digital” and applying the latest tools will not automatically guarantee sound market research. Nevertheless, we have great examples of how innovative approaches used in consumer research can make a difference in both the outcome and impact of market research in health when used exclusively or added to existing proven techniques. Let’s inspire you by highlighting some examples.

       

    1. Bottom-up free communication that connects insights and creates innovations

    2.  

    While digital qualitative research platforms in consumer research are here to stay, their application in health projects (especially B2B) is still not always top of mind. However, these digital sessions, in all of their forms, actually do have a proven track record in health research. Using platforms such as online communities or chat sessions to gain qualitative insights could add value to traditional research methods in multiple ways. It’s not only about enabling you to engage more easily with those targets that are difficult to bring into a central location – be that key opinion leaders, geographically dispersed targets or patients. But the bottom-up free communication and the participants’ anonymous status help them communicate more freely about detailed and often personal medical issues. They’re inclined to provide insights into “a day in the life” by sharing multimedia that shows them administering a drug, their interactions with their caregivers and more.

       

    1. Passive measurement, from online behavior to emotions

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    When optimizing patient support programs and information about diseases and treatments, you need to understand how patients orient themselves on the internet. Traditional research techniques, like online surveys, are based on recall alone, not actual behavior. Using a passive measurement tool, as used in consumer research, can fill the digital blind spot many brands have regarding their customers’ online behavior throughout the disease journey. By assessing the impact these tools had on how patients made their medical decisions, one could optimize the digital approach and assets to meet patients’ specific needs by patient type and disease state.

    Other ways of passive measurement using new technologies could help you get better emotional insights into key stakeholders. Think of concept testing when asking participants about their opinion and thoughts. New validated techniques that digitally analyze the voice of respondents on their emotional state or facial expression help you better analyze and understand respondents’ feelings and emotions over just a simple Q&A interview approach.

       

    1. In the moment, on the spot!

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    The simple use of mobile-based research, like in the consumer space, with in-the-moment, real-time feedback from both HCPs and patients, is becoming increasingly valuable. It provides rich voice recordings, as well as a multimedia perspective and allows us to understand our customers in more detail. It creates depth and context to real-world situations and challenges that key stakeholders find themselves dealing with each day.

       

    1. Virtual reality techniques to simulate the pharmacy or the GP office

    2.  

    And what about the growing opportunities of virtual reality research, which is being applied in consumer research more frequently nowadays?  We have explored several ways to also apply these techniques in health research. Think of a simulated pharmacy setting where you can test in-store behavior digitally among large groups of potential healthcare consumers. Not only does this virtual store shelf simulation help you to optimize packaging and design, but even simulated recommendations and dialogue with the healthcare professional (HCP) can help measure the impact of recommendations that might be successfully used for forecast exercises. These techniques, which are engaging for respondents as well as being cost- and time-efficient, help you adapt to scenarios by changing environmental cues or dialogue. In this way you can refine messages and materials, and even do forecasting by using the simulated prescribing environment, instead of the artificiality of a choice task allocation.

    Conclusion

    It’s a brave new evolving world with key healthcare stakeholders embracing innovative tools that examine not just their feedback, but their behavior, not just their words but their more revealing voices or facial expressions. With the rise of chat rooms and communities, patients have a comfort zone for more in-depth exploration of their concerns in an anonymous environment. These and other innovations by themselves, or in tandem with existing health research, like brand trackers or ATUs, provide an opportunity for a more in-depth look into your targeted healthcare stakeholders. Let these new avenues for engagement be an invitation to healthcare pioneers like yourself to shape more informed strategies that look to the future and boost health intelligence like never before.

    This article was co-authored by Chantal Bayard-Savelkouls and Steve O’Hara. To share your thoughts, email jan.guse@gfk.com or leave a comment below.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Bringing transparency to telecom tariffs
    • 06/02/17
    • Technology
    • Promotion and Causal Retail
    • Global
    • English

    Bringing transparency to telecom tariffs

    We provide a market leader in the German telecom market with real-time insight into competitors’ pricing strategies.

    • 06/02/17
    • Retail
    • Global
    • English

    Why retailers shouldn’t shy away from Amazon Prime members

    This is based on a byline article published May 15 by Internet Retailer.

    Amazon Prime members contributed $6.4 billion in revenue to the online behemoth in 2016. So what can other retailers learn from the digital behavior of this cohort, which is estimated at more than 65 million people? Many things, foremost among them that Prime members are very heavy online shoppers and are not wed exclusively to Amazon. In fact, they spend lots of time on other retailing apps and websites and, as a result, are ripe for conquesting by competitors who can rival Amazon’s seamless shopping experience. Apps should be a key component of this strategy.

    Tracking their behavior

    To conduct an in-depth analysis of Amazon Prime members, we accessed the passively tracked behavior of approximately 300 and compared their behavior to slightly more than 400 non-Prime consumers. This occurred from Aug. 1 to Dec. 31, 2016 via KnowledgePanelDigital, a cross-device single source panel that passively tracks digital behavior among a sample of mobile (smartphone or tablet) device owners.

    More than 100 digital shopping resources—from clubs like BJ’s to mass outlets like Walmart and pure play companies like Overstock—were part of our tracking and analysis. Overall, Amazon Prime members made far more visits and spent significantly more time using digital shopping resources than did non-Prime members. Total shopping visits were roughly 50 more per shopper than non-members and time spent shopping online by Prime members exceeded that of non-members by about six hours per person during the five-month period. Prime membership drove twice the number of visits to Amazon versus non-Prime members.

    App preferences for Prime and non-Prime shoppers

    While Amazon is the most used shopping touchpoint even among non-Prime members, there is a distinct difference in their preferences for apps versus mobile websites. During the five-month period, 91% of Amazon Prime members engaged with Amazon via its mobile site, compared with 77% of non-Prime shoppers. Just 55% of Prime members and 30% of non-members used the Amazon app.

    But despite this disparity, apps drove more repeat usage of and longer engagement with online shopping venues than mobile sites. And both Prime and non-Prime consumers showed a willingness to explore retail app options in categories like Pure Play and Mass.

    Prime members like to shop all over

    Prime members demonstrated an inclination towards online shopping, visiting Pure Play outlets twice as often as non-Prime members and being more likely to access grocery sellers online. One area where Prime and non-prime members were pretty much in sync is in their use of coupons and deals. Their top choices were Groupon (32% of Prime members, 32% of non-Prime), RetailMeNot (20% and 16%), Coupons.com (17% and 19%), Ebates (10% and 8%) and Ibotta (8% and 9%).

    The behavior of Prime members during November and December is particularly noteworthy because they showed an increase in shopping time earlier than non-members. Prime members’ shopping activity at places other than Amazon spiked upward in the first week of November, reaching a peak at the end of the month. Prime members did not show an increase in weekly shopping minutes on Amazon until the week of Thanksgiving when deals are traditionally offered.

    Conclusion

    Retailers should not shy away from Amazon Prime members. They’re very active at all sorts of online retail options and are open to various online shopping experiences. To compete with this highly evolved e-retailer you must elevate your app experience because it’s a great way to generate deeper and longer engagement. And start your holiday deals early. Prime members are in the forefront of seeking out the best merchandise and deals.

    Christina Pate is a Senior Research Director at GfK. Please email christina.pate@gfk.com or leave a comment below to share your thoughts.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • MMS and GfK close-in on Total Video Ratings Currency in Sweden
    • 06/02/17
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Advertising
    • TV Audience Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    MMS and GfK close-in on Total Video Ratings Currency in Sweden

    MMS – which measures the moving image in Sweden – has released its digital ad ratings service. The service covers video advertisements on broadcasters’ websites and apps viewed across PC, smartphone, tablet and smart TV. It is built upon GfK’s data integration and data science capabilities that fuse MMS’s multi-source data streams into actionable currency.

    • 06/01/17
    • Retail
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global
    • English

    The big, hairy, new luxury mindset and the opportunities it offers brands

    Being a 23 year old male, less than two years removed from undergrad, I’m still getting used to this whole “adulting” thing. My spending habits to start my professional career were sub-par at best – luckily I had the ability to live with my parents for a while. Now being off on my own, wanting nicer things can really challenge my wallet. Yet I still find my peers and I can find ways to indulge on the finer things in life whether it be travel, fashion, or daily aspects of our lives like personal grooming and coffee breaks.

    Putting luxury within consumers’ reach

    As we’ve recently noticed, consumer confidence is up, employment is up, and median household incomes have reached pre-recession levels. This gives us a little more room to be a bit more liberal with our spending, making what’s typically considered a “luxury” closer to our reach. GfK Consumer Life’s research shows that one in three Americans believe “now is a good time to buy.”  This sentiment is up 14 points from 2011, and continues to trend upwards.

    Here’s a question for you readers: how many 22-23 year old men does it take to plan a New Year’s trip to New Orleans?

    Answer: TEN.

    Planning this adventure was no small feat, as limited disposable income put us at a crossroads. We had our location, but even the cheapest hotel near the French Quarter was going to run us each at least an arm, a leg, and doubling our student loans.

    We had heard about AirBnB from friends, but never really looked into it before – yet it turned out to be the perfect fit. Staying in a New Orleans home gave us the ability to experience the city, rather than just visit. It comes as no surprise that our research increasingly shows that experiences are more important than possessions for Americans – especially among millennials. We valued this alternative option, and saw this as a luxury accommodation for our New Year’s voyage.

    Making luxury accessible across industries

    This taste for luxury is seen in more ways than just travel. Recent research from GfK Consumer Life shows that half of Americans daydream about being rich (the #2 thing Americans daydream about, #1 among <$50k HHI).  Many of us aspire for luxuries before our incomes can sustain it – so we have to get creative. I see many of my peers using services like Rent the Runway to get at least a taste of this luxurious feeling.  Paying student loans while saving money doesn’t give a recent college grad much disposable income to work with, but renting a designer dress is both sensible and a way to treat oneself.

    Brands offering products that connote premium or luxury can learn from this when seeking loyalty in their future customers.  The sharing economy gives us a feeling of being wealthy before our income catches up to our dreams, which aligns with GfK Consumer Life insights that 21 percent of Millennials associate the sharing economy with ‘giving you access to luxury goods that you normally could not afford’ (+4 pts from total Americans).

    Finding other opportunities that allow consumers to indulge

    Men’s grooming is another hot luxury opportunity. Growing up I never imagined spending as much time as I do grooming, but for the past ten months I’ve committed to growing a beard for the first time ever. I’ve even going as far as purchasing beard oils and creams to soften the hairs and make it look neater. Through beard blogs (yes, they exist!) and how-to videos, I successfully grew a full beard, and continue to browse different products and reviews to keep it around.

    When looking at the hard data, I find that I’m not alone! GfK Consumer Life’s research shows that men ages 18-34 are most likely to prefer to buy luxury brands of beauty/grooming products, at 57% (+17 pts from total US consumers, +8 pts from 18-34 women). Hordes of men are dishing out extra money for grooming to fit the mold; the opportunity to capture these men cannot be ignored.

    What about the consumer that doesn’t travel, shop, or meticulously groom each day? Well sometimes, we all just need to indulge in something for ourselves.

    More than one in three Americans strongly agree that it is important to indulge or pamper themselves on a regular basis (+6 pts from 2011). This trend is being capitalized on by people like ex-Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz, who has shifted his focus on building his Roastery & Reserve premium portfolio with $12 cups of coffee. This turns a consumer’s typical coffee break into “a multisensory coffee experience” while enjoying a unique food menu and coffee brewed in different ways.

    Conclusion

    Americans have more money and confidence than they’ve had in years, and are willing to spend on luxury, even if the investment is minimal. Younger generations want this premiumization too – but in different ways. The sharing economy and smaller yet premium indulgences offer brands across industries to offer products and services in new, exciting ways.

    Brett Willman is an Associate on the Consumer Life team at GfK. He can be reached at brett.willman@gfk.com.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • How to understand consumers' media usage and content consumption across devices
    • 05/31/17
    • Crossmedia Link
    • Global
    • English

    How to understand consumers' media usage and content consumption across devices

    Using GfK's Crossmedia Visualizer, you will gain insights on digital media audiences and their behaviors to identify and reach your target audiences.

  • UK Consumer Confidence increases two points to - 5. But when will the squeeze in living standards hit home?
    • 05/31/17
    • Press
    • Global
    • English

    UK Consumer Confidence increases two points to - 5. But when will the squeeze in living standards hit home?

    GfK’s long-running Consumer Confidence Index increased two points to - 5 in May. Four of the five measures increased, and one remained unchanged. 

    • 05/30/17
    • Retail
    • Promotion and Causal Retail
    • Global
    • English

    Step this way to find out if you’re getting your fair share of manufacturer investment

    As a retailer, you are to manufacturers what Ginger Rogers was to Fred Astaire: a principal partner. That’s why they invest with you to help promote their products across your channels – online, in-store and in print. But how can you be sure that you are perfectly in step with each other, and you’re receiving a fair share of their trade marketing budget for the activities you execute for them?

    Intelligence you can leverage in conversations with manufacturers

    Let’s assume, for example, that you sell 20% of all smart TVs in a market. So, in theory, you should be able to command a proportion of the biggest TV manufacturer’s trade marketing budget for its new model that’s relative to your share of the market.

    From a manufacturer’s point of view, however, they will be looking not only at the retailer with the greatest share of sales now, but also the one with the most potential to gain market share in the future. If they can see that a particular retailer has made gains and the indications are that they will continue to do so, they could move the lion’s share of their trade marketing budget to this contender.

    But this is only part of a manufacturer’s consideration set. They also want to know that their campaigns are being executed as agreed with their retail partners. So, if you know how you are performing when it comes to delivering different campaign elements across channels, and how this compares to your key competitors’ performance, you will be in a stronger position at the negotiating table with manufacturers. This information combined with your sales data provides you with intelligence that you can leverage in conversations with manufacturers about their level of investment with you.

    Determining the level of investment you should be able to command from manufacturers

    We can help you track how retailers are promoting products and their selling points on their websites, in-store, at the point of sale and in their advertising. Based on this information and your sales figures, we can conduct a fair share analysis to determine what level of investment you should be able to command from manufacturers. If you are delivering the agreed trade marketing campaign, our data will show this. It will also provide evidence of which elements of the campaign work and which don’t, as well as what promotions your competitors are running. This level of transparency relieves tensions on both sides, and ensures that you and your manufacturer partners are in perfect harmony when making your agreements.

    Contact me at Karsten.holdorf@gfk.com to find out how we can help you to get your fair share of your partners’ promotional investments.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Smart major domestic appliances are connecting with households globally
    • 05/29/17
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Point of Sales Tracking
    • Connected car
    • Global
    • English

    Smart major domestic appliances are connecting with households globally

    Smart connected major domestic appliances (MDA) like washing machines, dishwashers and tumble dryers are winning over Connected Consumers globally. Discover more about sales of smart MDA with our infographic.

    • 05/25/17
    • User Experience (UX)
    • Global
    • English

    Consumer attitudes around materialism present opportunities for brands

    According to the results just released from our online international survey, three out of ten people (31%) answered firmly that they “would rather have more time than more money”.  In comparison, only one out of ten respondents (9%) disagreed with the same statement.

    The survey also asked how strongly its participants agree that “experiences are more important than possessions”, with over ten times as many people firmly agreeing rather than disagreeing.

    Breaking down the results by country, income and age

    Those in China (41%), Brazil (37%) and Argentina (32%) ranked the highest, respectively, for their strong preference for more time over more money.

     

    Mexico (57%), Argentina (53%) and the United States (53%) ranked the highest in firmly agreeing that experiences are more important than possessions.

     

    Income played a minor role in the response variances, with higher income households valuing time and experiences slightly more than lower income households, but not to a significant extent.

    Survey respondents aged over 60 were more split in their answers, with 19% preferring “more time to more money” and 13% preferring the opposite.  Those in their twenties and thirties value time over money the most, at 36% agreement vs. 7% who disagree.

    What it means for brands

    These findings clearly demonstrate that there are strong opportunities for brands that can associate themselves in the minds of consumers with giving quality time back to their lives, or by simplifying and quickening their daily tasks. Brands can also differentiate themselves from competitors by identifying ways to turn their purchase process into more of an experience for the consumer.

    About the study

    *All the data presented in this blog represents the top 2 boxes (agreement) and bottom 2 boxes (disagreement) from on a 7-point scale where “1” means “disagree strongly” and “7” means “agree strongly.” GfK conducted the online survey with over 22,000 consumers aged 15 or older across 17 countries. Fieldwork was completed in summer 2016. Data are weighted to reflect the demographic composition of the online population aged 15+ in each market. The global average given in this release is weighted based on the size of each country proportional to the other countries. Countries covered are Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Netherlands, Russia, South Korea, Spain, UK and USA.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Opportunity for brands that can give back time or experiences to consumers
    • 05/25/17
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global Study
    • Consumer Life
    • Global
    • English

    Opportunity for brands that can give back time or experiences to consumers

    Three in ten people (31 percent) would firmly prefer to have more time than more money – compared to only nine percent who firmly disagree with that. And over four in ten (44 percent) firmly believe that experiences are more important than possession – compared to just three percent who firmly disagree with that. 

  • Upward trend in the consumer climate continues
    • 05/24/17
    • Press
    • Financial Services
    • Public Services
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global
    • English

    Upward trend in the consumer climate continues

    Findings of the GfK Consumer Climate Study for Germany for May 2017

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