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    • 04/04/17
    • Consumer Goods
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    3 things brands need to know about marketing to today’s dads

    My wife and I recently binge-watched “This is Us.”  As a father of two, I was attuned to the portrayal of the dads on this fictional NBC show (for the un-initiated).  Randall, William, and Jack make up an all-star cast of TV dads.  Sure, all three have their flaws, but I’m convinced that some combination of these TV dads is the actual father I’m supposed to be.  Kind and loving like Randall, strong and inspiring like Jack, wise and cool like William.  But all three share a common thread – a willingness to take on a large role in their kids’ and grandkids’ day-to-day lives.

    An important message to marketers

    There is an important message in the show to marketers about dads (and granddads) like Randall, William, and Jack.  According to research from GfK Consumer Life’s global study, fathers averaged across 18 countries are more likely today than in the past to take on household chores like cooking, cleaning, and shopping for groceries.  In addition, as “This is Us” aptly displays, common dad tropes are being replaced by a more dynamic and realistic archetype.

    That’s not to say that fathers are the new mothers.  Sure, dads still love to kick back in the man cave with a cold one and hide from folding the laundry (don’t tell my wife).  And in fact, there are recent studies suggesting that attitudes towards more traditional gender roles are making a bit of a comeback – especially in the US.

    Recent studies from GfK Consumer Life in the US have similar findings (more to come in a future post).  But modern reality dictates and encourages dads to be more omni-present in chores and their kids’ lives.  There are a few recent ads that speak to these themes.  I’m partial to this one from Google (Dear Sophie) and this one from Hyundai (Dad’s Sixth Sense).

    So what do marketers need to know about today’s dads?

    1. We like to blaze a trail and create new ways of doing household chores. Especially watch out for us in the kitchen, where we will experiment a bit more than moms.  This domestic innovation isn’t always appreciated, as about half of dads claim they are the best cook in the house, while overwhelmingly kids are much more likely to say that Mom is the best. (pro-tip: kids don’t like sriracha mac and cheese, but they do like ‘regular’ mac and cheese).
    1. We are smarter shoppers with go-to brands, and a pinch of nostalgia. Dads bring a unique perspective to the weekly shopping trip.  We are increasingly deal-oriented, but still tend to be influenced heavily by brands – especially brands that we remember from our childhood.
    1. We put in a lot of research when making a purchase decision (especially for bigger ticket items). Increasingly, dads are likely to consult their on-line and off-line networks before making a decision.  And for all the jokes about men never asking for directions, growing numbers will ask salespeople for information.

    The role of fathers on TV, advertising, and in real life is forever changed.  As marketers, we have a responsibility and a business imperative to engage them in a realistic fashion, without patronizing.  Now excuse me while I grab my herb-infused duck breast from the oven, my four-year old is sure to love it this time!

    Tim Kenyon is Vice President on the Consumer Life team at GfK. He can be reached at tim.kenyon@gfk.com.

    • 03/31/17
    • Health
    • Global
    • English

    Dispatches from eyeforpharma: Digitizing patient and professional engagement

    One week prior to eyeforpharma, the city saw one of the most stunning modern football* feats when Barcelona defeated Paris St.-Germain 6-1. eyeforpharma was a sideshow in Barcelona, but the center stage for an industry reinventing its sales and marketing model.

    I had the pleasure of chairing two tracks: Digital Transformation and Customer Engagement. Speakers shared “how-to” guides for effecting change with an emphasis on practical advice with case studies.

    Where is pharma when you need them?

    Google’s director of healthcare, Ryan Olahan, challenged the industry to move faster, think bigger, win the micro moments, help first (sell drugs later) and embrace an openness to rapid testing/learning. He emphasized that pharma companies are not necessarily present where and when consumers need support. Mobile searches for health information spike after doctor’s visits, and YouTube hosts volumes of user-generated video content that meets patients’ needs. Yet pharma is often invisible at these micro moments.

    High-level learnings from top pharma thought leaders

    Speakers from UCB, S3 ConnectedHealth, Janssen, Novartis and QuintilesIMS addressed digital transformation in pharma, with some high-level learnings:

       

    • Digital strategies need to be optimized for a mobile environment. The industry can’t (and perhaps doesn’t) understand customers and patients enough. Customer journeys are cornerstones, but beware of treating customers or patients as an average. Respect individual and sub-segment differences.
    • How are the industry’s digital efforts directly impacting patients? There should be a pay-off for patients if digital transformation is to be deemed successful.
    • Manage micro and macro patient experiences so that the industry’s touchpoints with external stakeholders are connected.
    • Barriers to digital transformation are organizational and human, rarely technical.
    •  

    The speakers presented case studies showcasing specifics for implementing digital customer engagement strategies. But fresh frameworks for measuring these new customer engagement paradigms were not in evidence. For example, behavior is the best indicator of healthcare professionals (HCP) channel preference, yet we are still relying on outmoded satisfaction metrics to measure channel impact. Speakers referenced customer journeys but there was little mention of digital monitoring that can decode the digital blind spot in so many journeys.

    Lessons in boosting customer engagement

    Yet, the customer engagement track with Teva, Amgen, Ashfield, Ipsos and GSK set out some strong examples of powering up customer engagement with digital and non-digital components:

       

    • Apps are not an excuse for a digital strategy – they are tools, not an end in and of themselves. And they will not magically address issues of non-adherence.
    • Patient support programs offer a golden opportunity to enrich the patient experience. Co-creation with patients works well in the development of PSPs, but only if it starts early in the formative process.
    • Design with patients in mind – think user experience, not just company goals.
    • Arm HCPs with the right techniques/tools to effect behavioral change in patients, such as motivational interviewing by nurses.
    • Consider systems 1 versus 2 thinking when designing programs that aim to shift behaviors.
    • People and partners will either hinder or help your customer engagement strategies. The wrong choices can cost an organization significant delays in implementing new digital and customer engagement systems.
    • Content has to be relevant and informed by context and channel; pharma companies can no longer push content irrespective of these considerations.
    •  

    Speakers cited inspiration from outside the Rx industry, such as Lego (for co-creation), and P&G’s Dover campaign.

    Overall, eyeforpharma was a balance of inspiration and how-to examples for getting it done. We witnessed so many organizations moving beyond the drawing board to tangible actions.

    Justin Edge is GfK’s Global Head of Health. You can connect with Justin on LinkedIn or send him a note at justin.edge@gfk.com.

  • UK Consumer Confidence stays at -6 in March
    • 03/31/17
    • Press
    • Financial Services
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Automotive
    • Consumer Goods
    • FMCG
    • Global
    • English

    UK Consumer Confidence stays at -6 in March

    GfK’s long-running Consumer Confidence Index remains stable at -6 in March.  Three of the five measures stayed at the same level and two measures saw increases.

  • Squeeze-out request submitted to GfK
    • 03/30/17
    • Press
    • HQ financials
    • Investors
    • Global
    • English

    Squeeze-out request submitted to GfK

    The formal request by GfK’s majority shareholder Acceleratio Capital N.V. (Acceleratio) for a squeeze-out of the minority shareholders was submitted to the Management Board of GfK SE today.

  • Giving a technology company a window on the global retail landscape
    • 03/30/17
    • Technology
    • Global
    • English

    Giving a technology company a window on the global retail landscape

    Our shelf analysis and print advertising monitoring services help one of the world’s largest technology companies understand the latest retail trends affecting its key hardware categories.

  • Streamlining shelf assortment for an appliance manufacturer
    • 03/30/17
    • Consumer Goods
    • Global
    • English

    Streamlining shelf assortment for an appliance manufacturer

    We conducted a shopper and point of sales analysis to refine a company’s shelf concept in the Italian kitchen appliance market.

  • Optimizing strategic planning in a complex economic climate
    • 03/30/17
    • Retail
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global
    • English

    Optimizing strategic planning in a complex economic climate

    Our forecasting solutions gives a retailer insight into the growth it can expect across 96 product groups for two financial years.

  • How are technical consumer goods markets developing across the globe?
    • 03/30/17
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Global
    • English

    How are technical consumer goods markets developing across the globe?

    Explore our infographic to get the answer to this question.

  • Boosting hypermarket sales in small domestic appliances
    • 03/30/17
    • Consumer Goods
    • Point of Sales Analytics
    • Global
    • English

    Boosting hypermarket sales in small domestic appliances

    “Optimizing assortment in our sector is a challenge. Thanks to GfK, we were able to re-design the category offer, increasing its performance. We will expand this approach to some other countries.”

  • Optimizing retail performance in small appliances
    • 03/30/17
    • Consumer Goods
    • Point of Sales Analytics
    • Global
    • English

    Optimizing retail performance in small appliances

    Our research helps our client allocate resources to the most effective retail strategies.

  • Enabling a printer manufacturer to optimize pricing
    • 03/30/17
    • Technology
    • Point of Sales Analytics
    • Global
    • English

    Enabling a printer manufacturer to optimize pricing

    We investigated price elasticity in the European cartridge and toner market.

  • Understanding retailer performance in consumer technology
    • 03/30/17
    • Point of Sales Analytics
    • Global
    • English

    Understanding retailer performance in consumer technology

    Our research helps our client allocate marketing resources to the most effective retail strategies.

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