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  • Global study: preferred vacation type
    • 04/25/17
    • Global Study
    • Global
    • English

    Global study: preferred vacation type

    Download our full report and find out which nations prefer relaxing vacations and who decides for active holidays.

    • 04/21/17
    • Retail
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Retail today and tomorrow: Innovating in the age of disruption

    Today’s changing retail environment is proving to be a major test of marketers’ agility.

    It is no secret that the convenience of online shopping has drawn customers away from traditional brick-and-mortar outlets. Walking from store to store in search of the perfect outfit or gift has transformed, in many cases, into jumping from website to website, credit card in hand.  Along with this major transformation has come many difficult adjustments.

    So where does this leave brick-and-mortar stores?

    The role of the store itself is being re-defined in our modern age, as traditional storefronts turn into immersive showrooms and leisure destinations, and much more.  Retailers, and specifically mall operators, are aiming for more experiential elements, while foregoing traditional anchors for more entertainment-based locations like movie theaters and gyms.

    GfK’s FutureBuy® data shows that people who shop in brick-and-mortar stores do so because they can physically see the product before they buy, they shop there routinely and they get “instant gratification” by getting the products much sooner.  When they shop online, however, the reasons tend to be saving money, better selection and the overall ease of shopping.

    Given these dramatic changes, marketers need to play to the strengths of traditional retail stores – and keep a few key lessons in mind.

    1. Stay agile.  In today’s retail environment, marketers have to be flexible and creative to satisfy the evolving consumer.  We see a trend where shopping spaces are increasingly being integrated into traditional urban surroundings, like the shops at the Oculus of New York’s World Trade Center or in Chinese open cities, with stores and interactive park-like features (trees, water fountains, shops and screens) that create a new shopping “village”.  There are numerous new business models that brands can leverage in new ways.
    2. Capitalize on the online-offline experience.  Consumers desire rewarding experiences.  The latest data from GfK Consumer Life shows that experience is the #1 trend in the United States, and store shopping remains a key leisure pursuit. Three in four Americans agree that “it’s fun to browse stores and see what’s new and different”.  The current market is seeing big online players capitalizing on this trend as they open brick-and-mortar retail locations.  For example, Amazon bookstores allow you to buy books in-store or have a fun retail experience, but lighten your load by having the book delivered or letting you purchase a digital copy.  Warby Parker and Bonobos are popular online players who have showrooms.  At Bonobos, you can visit ether of the “Guideshops” get 1-1 attention from a “Guide” to get the exact fit and measurement of your clothing, but you walk out hands-free, without paying for delivery of your chosen items.  This can surely help personalize the experience, and alleviate some of the operating costs that physical retailers face to be more competitive with pure online players.

      On the flipside, customization can be a challenge for online-only brands.  Nearly four in ten Americans agree that they like to buy products that can be tailored to their needs.  Major retailers are starting to optimize their brick and mortar footprint to maximize the omnichannel fulfillment with click & collect and filling excess square footage with shop-in-shop concepts.  But the real challenge for brick and mortar retailers is how to keep up online without killing their margins.
    3. Use new technology to your advantage.  We are at the tipping point of the AI explosion, and Artificial Intelligence will surely enhance the online shopping experience.  In fact, almost three in ten Americans (28%) would try out new products before buying them, such as cars or paint colors, and a quarter (24%) would use a VR headset to shop as if they were in a real store.  Virtual reality in particular could be useful in a brick-and-mortar showroom.  AI is being used much more to improve product search effectiveness on retailer websites and in making product recommendations than from a virtual “trying out” process.

      Lowe’s has been using VR well, in helping customers visualize what decorating a room in their house might look like (along with augmented reality technology) and North Face for the outdoor experience.  AI will certainly help with product search and IBM’s Watson AI is paving the way to improve product recommendations.  AI is just the tip of the iceberg as a lot can be said for bots and drones, which as they are starting to play a much greater role to the retail environment and logistics.

    Disruptive times call for staying attuned with consumers’ changing needs and lifestyles.  We are at the brink of the 4th industrial revolution, which will undoubtedly shape the future of many aspects of consumers’ lives, including how we shop.  Thus, the time for keeping a close eye on new technologies and innovating for the future has never been better.

    Jola Burnett is a Vice President on the Consumer Life team at GfK. She can be reached at jola.burnett@gfk.com.

  • Improving the user experience of a ticket machine interface
    • 04/20/17
    • Travel and Hospitality
    • User Experience (UX)
    • Global
    • English

    Improving the user experience of a ticket machine interface

    We aimed to improve the user experience of Deutsche Bahn’s touchscreen user interface for customers, thereby improving the ticket- buying experience.

  • Boosting a distributor’s competitive advantage in ecommerce
    • 04/20/17
    • Retail
    • Digital Market Intelligence
    • Global
    • English

    Boosting a distributor’s competitive advantage in ecommerce

    Our product data and ecommerce technology solutions empower S.P. Richards’ dealers to increase their online sales.

    • 04/19/17
    • Technology
    • Consumer Goods
    • FMCG
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    From “mission impossible” to “mission accomplished”: How tech manufacturers can maximize the media mix

    As a marketer of durable goods, your likely mission is to build brand image, optimize your media budget and ultimately to generate profit. While that might sound like “mission impossible”, the good news is that there is a tested research technique that can help. Marketing mix modeling offers a way for marketers to successfully overcome the mounting challenges they face. In this blog, we explore four reasons why marketing mix modeling is as relevant to manufacturers of durable goods as it is to the consumer goods industry. In doing so, we will help you navigate from “mission impossible” to “mission accomplished”.

    Mission one: Harness the digitization of media

    Put simply, in the digital age, there are more media channels and more connected devices. Consequently, Connected Consumers are exposed to more advertising messages than ever before. This media fragmentation makes it difficult for manufacturers to know where, when and how to reach consumers. In addition, the immediacy of the digital channel has placed more pressure on marketing campaigns to deliver short-term sales. Add to this the proven decline in consumers’ average attention span, and you have a challenge that even the Impossible Missions Force’s Ethan Hunt might be happy to see self-destruct in five seconds.

    The success of any campaign depends on getting your media mix right. In order to maximize your budget, it is essential to have accurate insights on how your ads are performing at any given moment. What you need to understand is which campaigns on which media platforms positively impact sales of your product. Marketing mix modeling evaluates the contribution of the different media channels – both online and offline – enabling you to allocate your budget so that it delivers maximum ROI.

    Mission two: Think omnichannel

    In the technical consumer goods (TCG) sector, e-commerce is an extremely important channel, and its share of sales is growing annually. According to our Point of Sales (POS) Tracking data, online accounted for 23.1% of overall sales in 2016 (see infographic). Shoppers have adopted an omnichannel approach to shopping in the TCG sector. The message couldn’t be clearer: if your products aren’t available across all channels, you are losing sales.

    Omnichannel shopping is becoming the norm across many categories

    % of shoppers reporting having shopped online and in store for a product, GfK FutureBuy, 2016

    Online has also given consumers the power to check prices and compare products. This, in turn, has amplified the importance of both the manufacturer’s and retailer’s promotional activities.

    Marketing mix modeling enables you to understand exactly which of your promotions work, providing you with the intelligence you need to support your marketing decisions. Measuring the effectiveness of your executions gives you the power to fully optimize your activity for each channel.

    Mission three: Dealing with product feature commoditization

    When technology is new, success can be built on product features. However, as tech markets mature, all brands and models become very similar. In this type of market, it becomes virtually impossible to stand out for having a “great product”. Commoditization is rife, and manufacturers and retailers must find new ways to differentiate themselves from their competitors.

    Today’s Connected Consumers will only engage with, relate to and buy your product when they’ve had a brand experience. And they’ll only return to your brand if their experience of it was memorable. Consequently, we’re seeing the trend for marketing campaigns that focus more on product benefits and less on features spread across the globe. It is becoming more common for technology manufacturers to focus on a compelling brand experience in their advertising.

    Source: GfK Consumer Life

    A clear communications campaign is required if you are to succeed in conveying your product and brand values, and provide a memorable experience as well. Marketing mix modeling measures the sales impact of these campaigns and the media used to distribute them. It identifies the ROI for each channel and evaluates cross-media and cross-channel synergies.

    Mission four: Tackling the shorter product life cycle

    In consumer tech, the product life cycle is getting faster while the re-purchase ability slows down. At the same time, for almost all brands, advertising campaigns tend to be short-lived and focused specifically on new product launches. Ultimately, this means there is less time to deliver a margin.

    When planning your next advertising campaign, you may need to choose between investing in an intensive short-term but high-impact, high-cost TV spot versus a longer-term digital execution delivered via social networks. The commercial success or failure of your campaign may rest on this decision. This is where marketing mix modeling can provide directional insight. By providing weekly sales contributions for the different elements of your campaign, it can help you identify the most appropriate media plan to drive sales at the crucial moment. At the same time, it can also support your brand’s growth in the longer term.

    Summary: Mission accomplished

    We’ve addressed four of the key challenges faced by TCG marketers and manufacturers. Marketing mix modeling can help you understand how your above- and below-the-line marketing activities are driving your sales. We believe it is the way to accomplish your mission in today’s highly competitive global marketplace.

    Bjoern Kroog is Global Director of GfK POS Analytics. To share your thoughts, please email bjoern.kroog@gfk.com or leave a comment below.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    • 04/19/17
    • Technology
    • Consumer Goods
    • FMCG
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    From “mission impossible” to “mission accomplished”: How tech manufacturers can maximize the media mix

    As a marketer of durable goods, your likely mission is to build brand image, optimize your media budget and ultimately to generate profit. While that might sound like “mission impossible”, the good news is that there is a tested research technique that can help. Marketing mix modeling offers a way for marketers to successfully overcome the mounting challenges they face. In this blog, we explore four reasons why marketing mix modeling is as relevant to manufacturers of durable goods as it is to the consumer goods industry. In doing so, we will help you navigate from “mission impossible” to “mission accomplished”.

    Mission one: Harness the digitization of media

    Put simply, in the digital age, there are more media channels and more connected devices. Consequently, Connected Consumers are exposed to more advertising messages than ever before. This media fragmentation makes it difficult for manufacturers to know where, when and how to reach consumers. In addition, the immediacy of the digital channel has placed more pressure on marketing campaigns to deliver short-term sales. Add to this the proven decline in consumers’ average attention span, and you have a challenge that even the Impossible Missions Force’s Ethan Hunt might be happy to see self-destruct in five seconds.

    The success of any campaign depends on getting your media mix right. In order to maximize your budget, it is essential to have accurate insights on how your ads are performing at any given moment. What you need to understand is which campaigns on which media platforms positively impact sales of your product. Marketing mix modeling evaluates the contribution of the different media channels – both online and offline – enabling you to allocate your budget so that it delivers maximum ROI.

    Mission two: Think omnichannel

    In the technical consumer goods (TCG) sector, e-commerce is an extremely important channel, and its share of sales is growing annually. According to our Point of Sales (POS) Tracking data, online accounted for 23.1% of overall sales in 2016 (see infographic). Shoppers have adopted an omnichannel approach to shopping in the TCG sector. The message couldn’t be clearer: if your products aren’t available across all channels, you are losing sales.

    Omnichannel shopping is becoming the norm across many categories

    % of shoppers reporting having shopped online and in store for a product, GfK FutureBuy, 2016

    Online has also given consumers the power to check prices and compare products. This, in turn, has amplified the importance of both the manufacturer’s and retailer’s promotional activities.

    Marketing mix modeling enables you to understand exactly which of your promotions work, providing you with the intelligence you need to support your marketing decisions. Measuring the effectiveness of your executions gives you the power to fully optimize your activity for each channel.

    Mission three: Dealing with product feature commoditization

    When technology is new, success can be built on product features. However, as tech markets mature, all brands and models become very similar. In this type of market, it becomes virtually impossible to stand out for having a “great product”. Commoditization is rife, and manufacturers and retailers must find new ways to differentiate themselves from their competitors.

    Today’s Connected Consumers will only engage with, relate to and buy your product when they’ve had a brand experience. And they’ll only return to your brand if their experience of it was memorable. Consequently, we’re seeing the trend for marketing campaigns that focus more on product benefits and less on features spread across the globe. It is becoming more common for technology manufacturers to focus on a compelling brand experience in their advertising.

    Source: GfK Consumer Life

    A clear communications campaign is required if you are to succeed in conveying your product and brand values, and provide a memorable experience as well. Marketing mix modeling measures the sales impact of these campaigns and the media used to distribute them. It identifies the ROI for each channel and evaluates cross-media and cross-channel synergies.

    Mission four: Tackling the shorter product life cycle

    In consumer tech, the product life cycle is getting faster while the re-purchase ability slows down. At the same time, for almost all brands, advertising campaigns tend to be short-lived and focused specifically on new product launches. Ultimately, this means there is less time to deliver a margin.

    When planning your next advertising campaign, you may need to choose between investing in an intensive short-term but high-impact, high-cost TV spot versus a longer-term digital execution delivered via social networks. The commercial success or failure of your campaign may rest on this decision. This is where marketing mix modeling can provide directional insight. By providing weekly sales contributions for the different elements of your campaign, it can help you identify the most appropriate media plan to drive sales at the crucial moment. At the same time, it can also support your brand’s growth in the longer term.

    Summary: Mission accomplished

    We’ve addressed four of the key challenges faced by TCG marketers and manufacturers. Marketing mix modeling can help you understand how your above- and below-the-line marketing activities are driving your sales. We believe it is the way to accomplish your mission in today’s highly competitive global marketplace.

    Bjoern Kroog is Global Director of GfK POS Analytics. To share your thoughts, please email bjoern.kroog@gfk.com or leave a comment below.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • EU consumer climate at a nine-year peak
    • 04/19/17
    • Press
    • Financial Services
    • Public Services
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global
    • English

    EU consumer climate at a nine-year peak

    The positive mood among European consumers has continued into the first quarter of 2017. At the end of December 2016, the consumer climate for the 28 EU countries had already risen to its highest level since January 2008. In January 2017, it further climbed by two points to 19.9 points, before settling at a level of 18.9 in March.

  • Measuring multichannel marketing: Pharma plays catch-up
    • 04/18/17
    • Health
    • Global
    • English

    Measuring multichannel marketing: Pharma plays catch-up

    Is your organization ahead of or behind the multichannel marketing curve? Now is an ideal time to play catch-up.

    • 04/13/17
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Sustainability and ethics: How to keep up with the fashion industry

    “Fashion is not necessarily about labels. It’s not about brands. It’s about something else that comes from within you…” – Ralph Lauren

    Nowadays, style is not only about the logo you are wearing but the values that it represents. With this in mind, fashion brands need to know their consumers more than ever before in order to connect emotionally with them. Here are the three values fashion companies must embrace to build brand perception and stay relevant in a demanding market.

    1. Sustainable fashion

    It is becoming easier to see why high end and luxury fashion brands can no longer ignore sustainability. In fact, our research (1) shows that ‘protecting the environment’ is significantly higher up on consumers’ priority list than ‘looking good’.

    As fashion consumers grow more conscious, they also tend to trust brands less, and being credible becomes an issue for all labels, everywhere. Our data also indicates how informed and serious about environmental and social issues consumers have become over the past decade. This is no longer ‘fringe’ behavior but a market-wide opportunity.

    2. Ethical initiatives

    Indeed, we have witnessed many brands evolving and communicating their efforts in making their production more eco-friendly and respectful of fair-trade. It is an important evolution in the history of fashion, which until recently was characterized by a “fast fashion era”, resulting in too many articles of clothing produced that become obsolete within weeks.

    It is the younger generations who are mainly to thank for this move, thus, we are observing a new age in which fashion consumers will tend to focus their spending on quality over quantity, piling less in their wardrobe.

    As a reaction to this, fashion companies are compelled to become more transparent when it comes to how their clothes are made.

    We can see how the leading fashion industry environmental group, MADE-BY, has helped make it happen. The organisation, along with major UK companies like Ted Baker, worked together on individual sustainability programmes, helping them to reduce the amount of hazardous chemicals in their production, and increase the integration of  organic materials.

    3. Recycled is the new “en-vogue”

    Now that the bloggers, critics and other public faces of fashion have taken to promoting what’s good for the planet, for consumers, and for the companies’ employees, the high-end and luxury fashion companies made sure to follow the trend:

    • Hermes created “Le petit h”, which consists of creative pieces and accessories only made from the left-over materials from other bags, scarves, etc.
    • Adidas has launched a collection being marketed as designed to “help to clean up the Earth’s oceans” by using the waste floating around the world to make their footwear. Whilst 7,000 pairs of the UltraBOOST Uncaged Parley were planned, the three-stripes brand says it wants to produce more.

    Examples of these initiatives are numerous, and many start-ups followed their lead, creating a range of niche products, from salmon-skinned wallets to shirts of polyester from recycled drink bottles.

    Conclusion

    The world of fashion is powerful, and a close eye is being kept on its actions. It’s essential for brands to understand not only the role of sustainability within the decision making process of consumers, but also to explore their attitudes and behaviors. The question is, how do today’s connected consumers build brand perception and how can brands stay relevant in this demanding market?

    (1) Research taken from GfK Consumer Life (Roper Reports©), global annual survey of consumer of attitudes, beliefs and behaviors.

    Tiphaine Nilias is a Research Manager at GfK. To share your thoughts, please email tiphaine.nilias@gfk.com or leave a comment below.

    • 04/12/17
    • Technology
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Why these 5 tech trends have game-changing potential for brands

    Connected Consumers live in a constantly evolving world, where emerging new technology has the potential to impact everything we do.  Each year brings exciting new products and iterations which promise to revolutionize everything from transportation to retail to entertainment.

    For 2017, we’ve identified five of the hottest and most important tech trends that have the potential to become widely adopted in the mass market.

    1. Mobile payments

    Many Connected Consumers may have experienced the act of physically paying for something using their mobile device, yet most would be reluctant to go fully cashless or card-less on a trip to the store.  And despite the many convenient benefits that mobile payments offer, security concerns remain a unanimous deterrent.

    However, retailers that take advantage of mobile payments with a branded app have a unique opportunity to bolster loyalty by improving the shopping and check out process as well as utilizing rewards and customized product offers based on user data.  Younger consumers especially are more willing to agree to share their personal data in exchange for value in return.  Retailers and brands not offering mobile payments are currently missing out on this unique opportunity.

    If we look to the Asia Pacific region (and China in particular) which is several years ahead of the western world, mobile payments are widely accepted by merchants and retailers alike.  Will an improved retail experience lead to mobile payment adoption?  This year could provide the answer.

    View our free mobile payments infographic

    2. Virtual and augmented reality

    Last year saw the release of several new virtual reality products, with PlayStation VR being the most desired device among consumers, followed by the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive headsets.  Already appealing for its implications to the gaming and entertainment industry, VR and AR have the potential to reach the next level by expanding into other industries, from shopping to traveling to education and healthcare.

    With growing consumer interest and big investors like Facebook, Google and Microsoft, the key for the future of VR will be in understanding and meeting the needs of consumers, and incorporating VR into their personal and professional lives.  While price and safety concerns are minor obstacles towards adoption, continual improvements to the VR user experience will cause demand to grow.  As more industries seek to maximize the power of VR, this year is an exciting time and could prove to be a turning point which sees the technology approach mass market status.

     

    View our free virtual reality infographic

    3. Smart home

    There’s no shortage of products in the smart home market, with many Connected Consumers’ households already equipped with smart TVs.  But other home based devices are still catching on, and face several barriers before they meet the hype that has been circulating around smart home technology.

    The various benefits that smart home products provide appeal to different demographics, so clearly communicating them to the right consumer groups will go a long way towards encouraging adoption.  For example, home safety, security and reducing utility costs are important to Gen X-ers and Boomers, while Millennials are interested in having the latest technology as well as the environmental benefits that it can offer.

    With many Millennials (and especially the older Gen Y group) set to become home owners in the coming years, they are a key target group with a large proportion of Leading Edge Consumers that could be influential to others.  As seen with the successful recent launch of Amazon Echo, whose voice interface provides an intuitive and easy fit into people’s lives, a simple and seamless user experience is an absolute necessity for products in the smart home category.

     

    View our free smart home infographic

    4. Autonomous vehicles

    While automakers and tech companies are hard at work to realize the vision of the self-driving car, there are still several years to go before they start occupying the roads.  At the moment, too many unanswered logistical questions exist around autonomous vehicles, but there is no denying their appeal, especially with younger consumers.

    With widespread adoption predicted to begin around 2025, there is no doubt that autonomous vehicles have the potential to revolutionize transportation and the auto industry, but the technology is still currently in its infancy.  The key to success will be matching the evolving technology with consumers’ needs, while prioritizing public safety and established protocols for drivers and passengers.

     

    View our free autonomous vehicles infographic

    5. Wearables

    The market for wearables, while enjoying healthy growth, has not lived up to the tech industry’s expectations so far.  Heralded as the next big tech item, early smartwatches didn’t quite reach mass market success, appealing mostly to early adopters and Leading Edge Consumers.

    As wearable devices evolve and designer brands begin to introduce more attractively designed offerings at varied price points, we expect to see an increase in consumer interest.  But retailers and manufacturers must understand the real-life uses of wearables and continue to tap into the trend of health and fitness monitoring.  Only then will wearables be able to reach the next level.

     

    View our free wearables infographic

    Conclusion

    This year could be a key turning point for many technologies on the verge of taking off, but new pairings of products and technology must deliver on consumers’ expectations to meet the hype.  For a true revolution to happen, brands must focus on enhancing the lives of Connected Consumers while alleviating their concerns that continue to be roadblocks to mass adoption.

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  • GfK announces changes to Supervisory Board
    • 04/07/17
    • Press
    • Investors
    • Global
    • English

    GfK announces changes to Supervisory Board

    Upon application of GfK SE, the Register Court of Nuremberg has appointed Thomas Ebeling, Johannes P. Huth and Philipp Freise as members of the Supervisory Board, effective April 7, 2017.

    • 04/06/17
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    Netflix now offers downloadable content to watch offline. So what?

    Netflix was the last to join the likes of Amazon Prime and catch-up services in offering its subscribers the flexibility to watch content offline. For a while, Netflix officials have been shutting down all downloading queries cold.

    Their decision to “focus on the 95% use case where customers watch movies when they have network access and not to focus on the 5% case of airplane use or watching movies in the backseat of your car,” quoting Gibson Biddle at the 2012 Stack Exchange, was followed through for many years.

    Then, as the company focused on growth outside the US, the offline mode was kind of a deal breaker to push subscription rates in emerging markets. In those countries, consumers had already adapted their behaviour to lower levels of broadband speeds and Wi-Fi access and a Netflix offering would have seemed incomplete or impractical without the option to download content.

    Downloading options introduced by Netflix

    So, as of the 30th November 2016, we got what we wished for; Netflix introduced downloading options for users worldwide, benefiting even us in the very much developed world in the UK.

    But have Netflix subscribers responded enthusiastically to the long-awaited downloading feature?

    Here are the facts:

       

    • The word has spread: the vast majority (63%) of Netflix subscribers are aware that downloading is now available
    • However, a mere 3% are using it
    • Of those who use it, two thirds do so a couple of times a month or less
    •  

    In essence, the download feature is rarely utilized by Netflix users, with the majority of content still being streamed directly. When watching a TV Series that has been downloaded, viewing is more likely to be just one episode, compared with if that content was streamed directly. ‘Binge watching’ is also less likely if content has been downloaded rather than streamed.

    Why aren’t users binge-watching downloadable content?

    ‘Binge-watching’- the high level control over what, when and for how long you watch a show (you just don’t dare the thought of stop watching) is a concept that seems to be losing its coolness if all is downloaded for convenience.

    When respondents were asked about the reasons they haven’t used this feature yet, the half-hearted ‘I view/stream all I want at home’ response ranked first (with 52% of Netflix subs agreeing). Technical barriers like ‘lack of storage space’ (27%) and ‘don’t know how’ (17%) were mentioned next, and finally 7% could not find content they wanted to download.

    For some, the downloading experience was restrictive, if not unpleasant: the unsuitability for desktop streamers, also for Android devices that don’t support HD officially, further technical barriers for Chromecast or AirPlay users, also limitations around the number of devices that can download at the same time, etc. (the list goes on) – all these combined with an incomplete downloading library and the enthusiasm fades away quickly.

    Netflix = streaming

    This is consistent with how users are using Amazon’s downloading option too, averaging at an unchanged 5% since launch. In essence, a download sweeps away the beauty of the ‘caught in the moment’, unplanned viewing experience and is reduced to a practicality function.

    So, thank you Netflix for the ‘nice to have’ perk; it’s got to be there even if hardly ever used; for peace of mind, planes and dodgy Wi-Fi service at hotels.

    Whilst acknowledging the ever changing video landscape, I would be really surprised if Netflix’s downloading usage presents an uptake over the next few quarter results of our SVOD study. It’s only when post-Generation Z consumers start their own revolution on the way content gets consumed that we will be in for a surprise!

    Mary Kyriakidi is the Director of Media & Entertainment at GfK. To share your thoughts, please email her at mary.kyriakidi@gfk.com or leave a comment below.

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