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    • 17/07/15
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Retail
    • Shopper
    • Global
    • English

    Hey, good looking…

    The pressure to look good surrounds us. TV programmes, advertisements on the high street and in magazines, newspaper stories on celebrities, even the endless selfies on social media – there are really very few major communication channels are not promoting images of good looking people.

    In amongst all this, GfK has released findings on how satisfied normal, everyday people in 22 countries say they are with their personal looks.

    The findings themselves are enlightening, but what is most interesting is what message they deliver to businesses in the fashion and beauty industries.

    Latin American countries are happiest with their looks Complete satisfaction with personal looks is highest in Latin America, with Mexico, Brazil and Argentina all appearing in the top five for the percentage of population claiming this.

    When we widen this to include those who say they are fairly satisfied, as well as those who are completely satisfied, Mexico comes out on top, standing at nearly three quarters (74 percent), closely followed by Turkey at 71 percent. Brazilians and Ukrainians come next at 65 percent each, with the Spanish, Germans and Argentinians all tying at 62 percent.

    The Japanese are the most critical of their own looks, with 38 percent not too satisfied or not at all satisfied, followed by the British, Russians and South Koreans all standing at  20 percent and Swedes tying with Australians at 19 percent.

    Teenagers only slightly more critical about their looks than others While there is some lean towards teenagers being most self-critical about their looks, it is not as heavy as might be expected – and comes almost wholly from those who are a little bit dissatisfied rather than entirely so.

    Overall, 16 percent of 15-19 year-olds say they are “not too satisfied” with their looks, compared to an average 12-13 percent for those aged 20-59 years old. And this difference disappears almost completely for those who are not at all satisfied with their looks, with every age group standing at either 3 or 4 percent.

    People aged 60 and over are least self-critical, with only nine percent say they are “not too satisfied” with their looks and three percent “not at all satisfied”.

    Men and women are almost level Comparison of the male and female responses also sheds new light on the assumption that women are more critical of their looks than men. Each gender has 43 percent saying they are fairly satisfied and 12 percent completely satisfied with how they look.

    When it comes to being dissatisfied, women do creep ahead of the men, but only by a few points – 14 percent being not too satisfied and 4 percent not at all satisfied, compared to 11 percent and 3 percent of men, respectively.

    Why do we care?

    For businesses in the fashion, beauty and personal grooming sectors, these finding help identify how you can adapt your messaging to resonate more strongly within each market, or with specific demographics. For example, in Japan, UK and Russia, significant numbers are likely to respond to marketing based around ‘improve or change your look’, while consumers in Mexico and Turkey are more likely to respond to offers around ‘refine and maintain your look’. And almost equal numbers of men as women are dissatisfied with how they look – so personal grooming ads targeted at men could well reap benefits.

    Full results are available, free of charge:

    Download the full set of data charts, showing both the global results and also country-by-country results.

    • 16/07/15
    • Retail
    • Shopper
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • United States
    • English

    GfK to Share Findings on Influential Consumers, Shopper Insights Activation at OmniShopper Conference

    GfK thought leaders will present with two key clients – Groupon and Henkel North America – at next week’s OmniShopper conference in Chicago.

    • 15/07/15
    • Retail
    • Shopper
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Future of retail: Can we be friends?

    The meteoric rise of digital combined with economic uncertainty has changed the path to purchase forever, creating a whole new raft of challenges for anyone selling through retail channels. We address these in a series of four blogs entitled “The future of retail”. We now have more information on shopper behavior and interests than ever before. Customers leave a trail of data in the public domain when they shop or buy. We therefore continue our journey by looking at how this data can be used to help retailers better understand their customers and build stronger relationships with them.

    Big data offers the opportunity for the creation of an increasingly personalized product suite and service. Our research shows that consumer appetite for such an offer differs by country, with those in emerging markets such as Argentina, Brazil, Romania, Columbia, China, Bulgaria and Mexico more likely to be positive compared to those in more mature markets. We’ve also seen from our FutureBuy research that personalization of service appeals more to younger consumers than older people. More than one half (52%) agreed they like websites making recommendations, compared to 39% of those aged 35 and over. However, young shoppers are just as concerned as older shoppers about the security of their personal information.

    Personalization to drive loyalty and long-term sales Personalization is not about short-term wins, it’s about making shopping easier for customers, building relationships and building sales in the long term. There is no question we are in the early days of using big data as a basis for the creation of personalized products and customer experiences, so examples are few and far between.

    What we do see are e-commerce sites using information about customer preferences to encourage them to buy more. Amazon and UK-based grocery retailer Ocado recommend items to buy based on personal preferences. Numerous retailers use retargeting advertising to remind shoppers of websites they’ve visited but not transacted on. Retailers such as Best Buy in the USA use locations services to detect when customers are in store, pushing targeted promotions to their mobile phones. In House of Fraser, Hawes & Curtis and Bentalls in the UK, shoppers can use an app to access a beacon from a mannequin to receive details about the clothes on display – with the option of purchasing through their smartphones.

    Other retailers, such as Selfridges and eBay, remind shoppers that their baskets are full but they have not checked out. This may increase sales at a tactical level, but whether it has a positive long-term effect on customer loyalty remains to be seen. Some shoppers perceive such marketing techniques as pushy and react badly to being made to feel they are being coerced into spending more money.

    Retailers must consider the importance of the short-term gain of a sale and weigh this up against building longer-term loyalty. Shorter-term sales tactics should be complemented with longer-term loyalty strategies. For instance, businesses can gain the confidence of shoppers by helping them to fulfill their shopping mission. This connects to a broader trend in retail of fulfilling the shopper’s primary mission quickly to maximize opportunities to up- and cross-sell. Personalized retail should therefore be about organizing your retail space and communications around the preferences of your shopper, and this should be viewed as a long-term investment in shopper-friendly marketing.

    Security of personal information remains a concern Our research suggests that many people are concerned about how their personal information is being used online. In fact, more than 50% of shoppers are concerned about this issue across all markets. French and Spanish consumers appear the most concerned, with American, Canadian, Japanese and Australian consumers all expressing some worries. Even in markets such as Brazil, India and China where there is openness to the idea of personalization, consumers are in need of reassurance about the protection of their personal data.

    Some retailers and manufacturers are showing customers how they can use their personal data to benefit themselves. For example, energy companies now have the technology to monitor energy usage at household level. This could be perceived as an invasion of privacy. However, the energy companies are showing their customers how to compare their data to similarly sized households and advising them on reducing energy consumption. This strategy does not result in a short-term profit, but it reduces the loss of customers to competitors and builds customer loyalty.

    Interestingly, there is a correlation between the demand for personalization of retail service and concern about security of personal information. The more information shoppers bestow on retailers, the more they want to be sure that it will be used responsibly. Building trust is essential. Loyal shoppers will return in the knowledge that the retailer or brand not only really understands their needs, but will also keep their information protected and secure.

    For more information, please contact James Llewellyn at James.Llewellyn@gfk.com.

    • 30/06/15
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Consumer Goods
    • Digital Market Intelligence
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Shopper
    • United Kingdom
    • English

    Exploring the brave new world of augmented reality

    In the launch issue of BRAD magazine - out now - we talk about the brave new world of augmented reality (AR) and how brands are using it to enhance the customer experience of their brand and increase consumer engagement.

  • Previous experience is biggest influence in LatAm shopping
    • 24/06/15
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Consumer Goods
    • Shopper
    • Global
    • English

    Previous experience is biggest influence in LatAm shopping

    Previous experience beats recommendations, price comparison sites, in-store displays and advertising.

    Apps and ability to pay using mobile phone trail well behind in importance.

    • 19/05/15
    • Retail
    • Consumer Goods
    • Digital Market Intelligence
    • Point of Sales Tracking
    • Shopper
    • United Kingdom
    • English

    Cookware: Induction, ceramic and sets drive the market value

    The pots and pans market has seen growth of 4.7% in volume and 10.8% in value from January to April 2015 against the corresponding period of last year.

    • 08/05/15
    • Retail
    • Shopper
    • Australia
    • English

    GfK study on Environmental values and ethical shopping

    Half of Australian shoppers only buy products appealing to their beliefs, values or ideals.

    • 20/04/15
    • Brand and Customer Experience
    • Shopper
    • United Kingdom
    • English

    Three quarters of consumers say brands have to be environmentally responsible

    With the 45th World Earth Day happening this week, GfK has published survey findings showing how important environmental values are to people internationally; with three quarters agreeing brands have to be environmentally responsible.

  • Three quarters of consumers say brands have to be environmentally responsible
    • 20/04/15
    • Brand and Customer Experience
    • Shopper
    • Global
    • English

    Three quarters of consumers say brands have to be environmentally responsible

    With the 45th World Earth Day happening this week, GfK has published survey findings showing how important environmental values are to people internationally; with three quarters agreeing brands have to be environmentally responsible.

    • 24/02/15
    • Retail
    • Shopper
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • United States
    • English

    In Canada, 31% of Mobile Phone Users Get in Touch with a Trusted Person While Shopping in a Store

    Compared to their global counterparts, Canadian shoppers in “brick and mortar” stores are using their mobile phones less for comparing prices and more for other forms of purchase validation.

  • Shoppers bringing online competition inside bricks-and-mortar stores
    • 23/02/15
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Consumer Goods
    • Shopper
    • Global
    • English

    Shoppers bringing online competition inside bricks-and-mortar stores

    Four in ten shoppers worldwide are using their mobile phones while shopping inside a store to compare prices. The same number are contacting friends or family for advice. And over a third are taking pictures of products they might buy.

    • 22/01/15
    • Retail
    • Shopper
    • United States
    • English

    GfK Identifies 10 Million US Households as High-Value Targets for Pet Retail

    A new GfK analysis has identified over 10 million US households that represent the greatest potential value for pet retailers and manufacturers. Using GfK’s Pet Owner Navigator, manufacturers and sellers in the pet retail marketplace can target their most important potential customers more efficiently in specific geographies – through promotion dollars, shelf-stocking decisions, in-store promotions, and other marketing efforts.

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