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Marca y experiencia del cliente

Las marcas están bajo presión ya que deben desarrollar conexiones emocionales y relaciones con los consumidores que son los encargados de tomar decisiones comerciales. 

El éxito se basa en la entrega de experiencias que resuenan entre nuestros clientes, a lo largo de cada punto de experiencia que tienen los consumidores con una marca, producto o servicio. 

Ayudamos a nuestros clientes a mejorar la relación entre sus marcas y los clientes, al analizar y optimizar la huella emocional, es decir, las experiencias del cliente que impulsan las decisiones inmediatas de compra, al igual que conexiones a largo plazo. Proporcionamos este servicio a nivel local, regional o global.

Nuestra Marca y Experiencia del Cliente (BACE, para abreviar), aborda la investigación de los diferentes puntos de contacto existentes a lo largo del proceso de compra, para generar conexiones emocionales duraderas. Esto ayuda a impulsar el rendimiento comercial y los resultados.

Últimas tendencias

Aquí puede encontrar las últimas tendencias sobre marca y experiencia del cliente. Siga leyendo

    • 10/01/14
    • Automotive
    • Brand and Customer Experience
    • Mexico
    • Spanish (Latin America)

    10/21/14 - 10/21/14
    Webinar │ Cómo puede ayudarle la inteligencia relacional a construir una marca exitosa

    ¿Quiere saber más acerca de cómo utilizar este innovador enfoque para administrar sus marcas?
    • 11/16/17
    • Public Services
    • Brand and Customer Experience
    • Public Communications and Social Science
    • Global
    • English

    Germany reclaims top “nation brand” ranking, with USA dropping to sixth place

    France leaps to second place for first time, since 2009, while UK regains ground to remain third and Japan enters top five for first time since 2011. USA is only country showing overall decline in 2017. Germany shows major gains in Governance, People, and Culture.
    • 10/30/17
    • Brand and Customer Experience
    • Global
    • English

    It’s time to listen to the voice of the customer

    Almost every major brand now has a Voice of the Customer (VoC) programme. And in recent years talk of CEM or VoC has increasingly been replaced with “customer-centricity”. However, the reality is that many VoC programmes actually seek to serve a business objective of monitoring a KPI such as NPS, and to justify decisions already taken. Rather than listening to the voice of the customer, instead we still all too often ask our customers to spend their precious time answering multiple rating scales that the customer doesn’t even care about. Is this really customer-centric?

    Many VoC programmes are not customer-centric

    A recent visit to my car dealership for a service implored me to score a 9 or 10 on a survey I had been given, as I was clearly told anything other than this score would result in negative consequences for the salesman in question. How, I wondered, did my experience become all about them? And how does this help improve the experience in the future? Let’s take another example. After a recent flight I was asked to give my feedback, only to be asked to rate multiple aspects of the experience. 15 minutes of questions about every conceivable aspect of the flight. What I really wanted to say was that the cabin service was really good, but after 10 minutes of answering about anything and everything other than this, I’d frankly lost the will to continue further and just wanted the whole experience to end. Again, the feeling persists that I was filling in a series of scorecards that suited the airline rather than feeling they genuinely wanted my feedback. Not exactly “customer-centric”. This old way of working is neither customer-centric nor sustainable into the future. We must change now or have change forced upon us.

    To be sustainable and relevant in the future, this must change

    Why? Firstly, in a world of big data and multiple screens, consumers have ever increasing demands upon their time, and a decreasing attention span. For researchers, this translates as lower response rates and a marked reduction in willingness to conduct longer surveys. To continue receiving meaningful feedback, brands need to demonstrate the relevance of doing so to the customers and engage with them. Working with your own clients can also provide a platform to take this further and start co-creating with them. You can start by stripping back questionnaires, relinquishing control and letting the customer control the agenda far more than they do currently. However, this doesn’t mean that VoC programmes should be about producing less useful information for the business, in fact the end outcome will be more beneficial to the business; more focused, more relevant insight, and at a lower cost.

    New technologies now enable a more customer-centric approach

    Using text and voice analytics, we are now able to really uncover what matters to the consumer, instead of inferring this from analysis of multiple questions. From these responses, we can recreate categorizations for analysis, add sentiment to our understanding, and understand customers at a really granular level. And we know everything said is relevant and important, because it has been volunteered and not forced, from the customer. Not only that, but as consumer expectations change in the face of an ever-evolving environment, this will appear in the unstructured data analysis. New themes can be tracked and measured, and retrospective trend analysis applied. Companies can see these changes and be more proactive in addressing them.

    A truly customer-centric approach is also more cost effective

    Finally, such an approach has substantial cost savings. Asking fewer questions reduces costs, and being able to analyze unstructured data also helps eliminate the need for ad-hoc research to dig deeper into changes in KPIs. With social media providing consumers with a platform to amplify good and bad experiences, listening to the voice of the customer has never been more important. It’s time we started to really listen. Take concept validation to the next level. Find out more about voice analytics with this interactive content. hbspt.cta.load(2405078, 'a9dd8501-7506-4137-b684-84f620855e9a', {});
    • 09/12/17
    • Brand and Customer Experience
    • Global
    • English

    3 basic mistakes that can ruin your customer experience survey

    The make-or-break for a customer experience survey is that it delivers a great experience in itself.  The customer has to be left feeling that their time spent in completing the survey is ultimately of direct benefit to themselves, not a wearisome sacrifice of time to benefit the company. I was recently sent a survey invitation asking me to give my feedback on a flight.  I decided to give it a go, but it turned out that the survey was longer than the flight (or at least that is how it felt). I do think it’s laudable that businesses ask for my feedback, but, while most surveys claim that the feedback will be ‘valued’, many survey experiences don’t make me feel valued. They fall into the three basic mistakes:
    • They are often far too long – compared to many people, I have a lot of motivation to complete surveys, but I sometimes give up due to the sheer length and, if I do make it to the end, I know that my last few answers to the endless grid style questions are pretty random.
    • Hygiene factors versus value-adds. I find the premise of some questions a bit odd – I understand that recommendation is a good thing for businesses, but I’m really not going to recommend my bank on the basis that I was able to withdraw my money easily, or it wasn’t a big effort to change a direct debit – some levels of service should be acknowledged as basic essentials, not value-adds.
    • Company-centric, not customer-centric. When I’m asked to give my comments, it’s often worded as wanting to find out why I gave a certain score (again mainly for recommendation). I might by cynical, but this makes me think that increasing the score is what matters to the company, rather than truly improving my experience. The survey questions must be worded from the customers’ viewpoint, encouraging them to give the information that matters to them, not just what matters to the company.
    It seems to me that for many businesses the customer survey has become just another management tool – to measure every single part of the customer journey with a ‘customer score’ – rather than a way to listen to the actual voice of the customer.  And it can’t be customer centric to get customers only to answer questions that the company wants to ask and, at the same time, dictate how they can answer (“please tick one box only”). What businesses need to capture are the experiences that are relevant and memorable to the customer, at the most appropriate point in time.  In order for feedback surveys to be both better experiences for the customer and ultimately more useful to the company, businesses need to be much smarter about what they ask, how they get more from less and how they connect the customer feedback to the other data they have in their business and across teams.

    4 tips for better customer experience surveys

    • If you need a score, then make the question relevant to the experience. Don’t use recommendation everywhere just because it makes your life easier to have consistency. Perhaps the customer just wants to feel happy?
    • Ask customers to describe their experience in their words – what a customer chooses to tell you is what is you need to know, because what is memorable will drive their future behaviour.
    • Let technology take the strain. Use text and voice analytics to understand not just what customers say, but also how they say it. This uncovers the root cause of their problems and the actions you need take.
    • Get everyone involved in understanding the results. Finding solutions to customer pain points shouldn’t be the sole responsibility of customer services.

    Summary

    Customer feedback needs to be treated as an energy source: it will be renewable and powerful, so long as you respect customers’ time and intelligence, design your questionnaire to be honestly customer-centric and use the results to build better experiences. For more information, please contact John Banerji at john.banerji@gfk.com. hbspt.cta.load(2405078, 'f783a63d-9721-4ea0-9afa-2fe97d270554', {});
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