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Trends and Forecasting

Today’s speed to market of new offerings and shortening product lifecycles place a unique pressure on businesses to stay ahead.  Consumer purchasing behavior is shifting more rapidly than ever.

To succeed, businesses need accurate sales forecasts -- based on robust analysis -- and the most up-to-date purchasing and market trends.

We deliver detailed forecasts of consumer demand for technology devices, as well as global technology market trends. 

Our forecasts are built using the world’s largest sample of point of sales data, combined with our global expertise and local knowledge. This combination provides our clients uniquely granular and timely forecasts of future demand – forecasting what products consumers will purchase, in what volume, at what price, and where.  

Forecasting for investors and capital markets

Institutional investors face pressure to perform. To succeed, businesses need visibility to significant trends at the earliest stage(s). Businesses need to acquire reliable and compliant information on where to invest. 

We provide investors with robust forecasts using the world’s largest sample of point of sales data. We predict and document turning points in consumer demand, providing regular, detailed company analyses on technology hardware, semiconductor and consumer durable companies. 

Our forecasts allow investors to make successful recommendations backed up by credible and compliant sources.

Latest insights

Here you can find the latest insights for Trends and Forecasting industry. View all insights

    • 06/29/18
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global
    • English

    UK Consumer Confidence drops two points to -9 in June

    Consumers in pre-Brexit UK are less confident about the economy and seem set on self-imposed austerity
    • 06/25/18
    • Travel and Hospitality
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global
    • English

    Key insights within travel: Three current themes for exploration

    With summer fast approaching – yes, it officially started on June 21st – Americans once again will be vacationing in record numbers. Recent forecasts estimate that over 246 million passengers will fly domestically between June and August (which averages to over 2.5 million per day). Flying of course is not the only travel option – with road trips being a normal part of the American genre. In fact, according to recent research from GfK Consumer Life, 67% of US leisure travelers have done so in a vehicle (vs. 54% traveling by plane). As more consumers look to travel, services such as Airbnb and Couchsurfing have become more popular – allowing many travelers to specifically land on what type of vacation they truly want. Here are three current travel trends that brands can leverage to further attract the traveler target.

    Surprise destinations

    Six in ten Americans now feel “the places where you spend your vacations” is an expression of themselves. This is now ahead of “the home you live in”, which has historically been on top when comparing both attributes (though consumers, led by Millennials are moving away from placing importance on the home). According to Airbnb’s own travel data, top destinations within the US are still considered mainstays (i.e. ‘tourist-y’) – places like New York City, Orlando, etc. However when looking at top trending destinations – those that have increased the most on searches and bookings from 2017 to 2018 – a different picture emerges. Middle American cities such as Indianapolis, Minneapolis, and Columbus, OH move towards the top of the list – one can assume that travelers are undoubtedly looking for a different experience in these places. The psyche of ‘been there, done that’ and/or ‘taking it slow’ could definitely be emerging among consumers. In addition, the ‘value for dollars’ equation probably gets solved easier when visiting places that are undoubtedly more affordable.

    ‘Last Chance’ Tourism

    Americans are also acknowledging that the world is rapidly changing today: 21% cite ‘global climate change’ as a top-three concern (from a list of 21), and +6 pts from just 2015. In turn, another travel trend that has gained popularity is the notion of ‘last chance’ tourism – visiting a place before the relevant experiences, or the destination itself, is gone forever. Many tourists have visited the Great Barrier Reef in Australia to see it “before it’s gone”, which may or may not happen anytime soon. Cuba has experienced increased tourism recently – with the idea that the native culture within the country might change if and when more Americans start traveling there. Authenticity (i.e. a feeling of ‘realness’) always seems to have a place within consumer sentiments – nearly seven in ten American feel authenticity as a ‘personal value’ is extremely/very important (consistently ranking it in the top-five among a list 50 personal values in recent years). The novelty factor will continue to be a hook for travels, as 69% of Americans agree, “I am always eager to see new places and do different things”. On the domestic side, a few US national parks are playing into this trend.

    Food and travel always mix

    Think of the last time you shared your travel experience with someone (or vice versa) – questions like “how was the food?” and “where did you eat?” were probably a part of the conversation. Well then, it’s probably not a surprise that 70% of Americans travelers agree, “I always like to experience local culture and foods when I travel”. And now, newer experiences such as food tours and cooking classes are increasingly sought after by travelers (Tripadvisor says both experiences rose ~50% in 2017 among US travelers). Coinciding again with the ‘sharing economy’ or ‘access economy’, offerings such as Meal Sharing and EatWith also allow for more local & authentic food experiences. As most of us all like to travel one way or the other, expect more and more consumers to curate the travel experience they truly desire. Companies can leverage these three areas of opportunity and offer solutions that will continue to appeal to the traveler mindset.
    • 06/05/18
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global
    • English

    Redefining forecasting

    Download our whitepaper and discover the three most important factors for spot-on forecasting: continuity, accuracy, and granularity. It’s your guide to getting it right. 
    • 06/05/18
    • Technology
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global
    • English

    In the fourth industrial revolution, customers remain king. What about workers?

    There is no doubt we are in the midst of a fourth industrial revolution – one in which digital technology is more than just an accessory. We are past simply talking about the internet as a business enabler; instead, we are seeing the lines between the physical, biological, and digital worlds begin to blur. AI and automation are being integrated into the very fabric of our lives, as workers and consumers, such that we may not know when we are talking to a real person on the phone as in the case of Google Duplex, or whether the competition for our next job is human or android. This is also a time marked by hugely accelerated change. Twenty years ago, smartphones and social media did not exist, and “digital targeting” was something you did in a video game. (Who remembers “Monkey Ball”?) There is no sign that this speed of revolution will let up. According to research by GfK Consumer Life, many Americans agree that change is good, and that we need more of it – a sentiment that has dramatically increased since 2011. Technology is boosting efficiency and productivity, giving employees room to focus on more valuable tasks; but it can also be so effective that it makes humans expendable. Many of the jobs our children will hold do not exist yet; and many of today’s jobs are destined to become obsolete. Some argue however that AI will generate more jobs than it will kill. So how can we prepare for this uncertain future, as workers and concerned consumers? New generations, new expectations At the World Economic Forum this year, Alibaba founder Jack Ma stressed the values of creativity and emotional IQ as critical to human success when competing with machines for the jobs of tomorrow. A new focus on future education and training will also be critical to prepare workers; this means re-training and re-skilling the current workforce to ready them for the changing environment. There is also no doubt that the workforce itself will be much different from today. Looking at the youngest segment of American consumers – known alternately as the Now Generation, post-Millennials, Gen Z, Centennials, or the iGen – we see that these future employees represent the most diverse generation in US history (according to the US Census Bureau). Compared to Millennials when they were the same age, this young generation is also highly ambitious. Being creative and imaginative is one of their core values, and technology is seamlessly embedded in their everyday lives. This means that they are tailor made for the flexible workplace, whether its self-motivated entrepreneurship or working at a distance for a traditional company. According to GfK MRI research, roughly 12.9 million US employees (employed either full or part time) report working primarily from a home office – up from 10.7 million just a decade ago. And GfK Consumer Life data shows that roughly 1 in 2 Americans want to work for themselves, with some of the prime reasons including the ability to be one’s own boss and flexibility in schedule and location. But this flexibility may come at a price – a loss in job security. We might see more companies leverage AI to match employees with gig jobs in real time; platforms like Working Not Working  already match freelancers and creative talent for various assignments. But there are often no benefits and no guarantees about tomorrow with such situations. When workers become consumers As consumers, we can now be targeted with offers so specific to our needs that we wonder if Google and Facebook can read our minds. Customization is no longer a perk, but a must-have, and consumers today are empowered to find the right products at the right prices as never before. Over 60% of Americans say they spend quite a lot of time researching brands before making a major purchase, thanks to real-time access to product information. AI and robotics will continue to streamline the processes that deliver speed and value to consumers – and put growing pressure on traditional retailers to compete on price, convenience, and customer service. This may mean that there will be fewer of the retail jobs we already know, but also potentially a variety of opportunities that we cannot yet imagine. The streamlining of tech devices working together to deliver seamless experiences is also something we might see replicated in the way businesses operate, with an increase in partnerships and collaboration to create new, unique consumer experiences. As digital devices enable communication in more and more ways, the hurdles that prevent co-working will slowly disappear. This even applies to intercontinental business. Internationalism – learning about other people, cultures and equality – is among the differentiating values for the youngest consumers (the Now Generation), when compared to Millennials at the same life stage. Working with people in different cultures, environments and time zones will be a huge benefit for tomorrow’s workers – and likely a source of added competition in some cases. The worry factor In all of this, a key factor for workers and consumers is privacy. As news reports of hacked corporate databases have mounted, anxiety among digital consumers has grown. The youngest generations are by far the most concerned about the security of their personal information – and, perhaps in a related point, also more environmentally conscious. Doing things the right way will be a must for companies that want to earn and keep consumer trust; these concerns will be every employee’s responsibility in workplaces of tomorrow. So where is this fourth industrial revolution leading us? Today’s world is just the tip of the iceberg – but it is surely an exciting time to see technology and its effects on many areas of our lives, as products and business models become more fluid. Consumers remain king – but workers may not always get the royal treatment. As employers and employees, we need to be sure we see tomorrow as clearly as possible – and start to take action today! hbspt.cta.load(2405078, 'f959b7ac-800c-45ab-bd5f-350e588da27a', {});
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