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Online Pricing Intelligence

Nog nooit eerder was in zo veel markten de prijsconcurrentie zo groot. Consumenten en retailers maken actief gebruik van online prijsinformatie en kunnen onmiddellijk zien welke prijzen retailers, en hun concurrenten, voor hun producten vragen. 

Door snelle veranderingen in de markt en het aantal concurrenten is het steeds belangrijker een volledig inzicht te hebben in de gehanteerde prijzen van een bepaald product. 

Wij hebben de oplossing; met Online Pricing Intelligence (OPI) ondersteunen wij zowel fabrikanten als retailers en bieden daarmee een volledig zicht op de dagelijkse prijsdynamiek van diverse merken en retailers. 

We volgen dagelijks, op artikelniveau, de prijzen van miljoenen producten in verschillende landen, en valuta. We laten zien hoe prijzen veranderen, hoe vaak en wanneer. 

Retailers kunnen met onze gegevens beoordelen hoe de prijs van hun product presteert in verschillende categorieën en regio's. Deze gegevens kunnen rechtstreeks gekoppeld worden aan uw prijsbeheersysteem zodat prijswijzigingen automatisch kunnen worden doorgevoerd op basis van de door u ingestelde criteria. Dit betekent dat uw prijsstrategie snel kan worden afgestemd op de veranderingen die uw concurrenten doorvoeren.

Fabrikanten zijn met onze diepgaande inzichten in staat om een beter begrip te krijgen van de positie van hun eigen én concurrerende producten in de markt en dit te volgen.

Laatste insights

Hier vind je de laatste insights voor online pricing intelligence. Bekijk alle insights

    • 12/01/15
    • Online Pricing Intelligence
    • Netherlands
    • Dutch

    Online Pricing Intelligence - Consumer Goods

    Klik hier voor een white paper van OPI - Consumer Goods
    • 12/01/15
    • Online Pricing Intelligence
    • Netherlands
    • Dutch

    Online Pricing Intelligence - Retail

    Klik hier voor een white paper van OPI - Retail
    • 10/31/18
    • Retail
    • Online Pricing Intelligence
    • Global
    • English

    Consumer confidence – does it impact pricing of products?

    When consumers feel more confident about their own financial situation and about the economy they tend to be more optimistic and spend more. However, in recent times consumers are not feeling optimistic, as tracked by the GfK consumer confidence monthly report. With additional external factors like inflation and Brexit, will this impact consumer confidence further and what will retailers need to do to reduce the impact to them? Why does it matter? Consumer confidence is an indicator for businesses and economists to understand how consumers are feeling in current economic climates. It should give a good indication on what consumers feel and what their potential spending plans are, when it comes to making major purchases. This is important for retailers and manufactures to track, as this can affect profits and help with understanding a consumer’s outlook. The latest GfK consumer confidence index for October remains negative and decreasing from -9 to -10, which suggests consumes are ready to further scale back their spending. The GfK consumer confidence study (see table below) found that 65% of consumers that were asked, believe that prices either will have a rapid increase or will increase at the current rate in the next 12 months. This could mean that consumers decide to buy now rather than waiting for price increases, especially with the uncertainty surrounding Brexit. What affect does it have on pricing goods? With low consumer confidence and the majority of consumers think prices will rise, retailers and manufacturers need to act to entice consumers to continue spending. As both need to make sure they sustain or increase demand levels with their pricing and promotions, otherwise they could see profits fall. We are already seeing some action, with retailers’ pricing on 43-55 inch TV’s dropping by 18% in the past 12 months – and 10% over the last 3 months. This indicates that retailers know they need to compete for business to gain more consumers and increase sales. For both manufacturers and retailers, until recently there was an upward trend in the number of consumers who thought that now was a good time to make a major purchase. However, this has taken a slight decrease in the last month – as shown in the graph below. So enhanced promotions on items such as white goods or furniture may well entice more consumers to spend, rather than save in the upcoming sales events. What else can retailers and manufacturers do? This is a pivotal time for retailers, with the ONS reporting that wage growth is at its fastest for nearly 10 years, suggesting that consumers now have more disposable income to spend on major purchases. Inflation will play a major part on this with the recent announcement that it has fallen back to 2.2%. If inflation doesn’t increase it could mean consumers become more confident about purchases and feel the effects of wage growth even more. With wage growth on the rise and inflation not increasing as much as initially thought, what do retailers and manufacturers need to think about, going forwards, to make sure consumers choose to spend rather than save? Both groups will need find ways to stay competitive and relevant in an arena where consumers are now more concerned about getting value for money or having a memorable shopping experience. For example, John Lewis recently announced that they are looking to boost their in-store experience – aiming to buck the trend of more consumers moving to online shopping rather than in store. This is an ongoing battle, given that ONS reporting shows online sales have increased by 14.2% in August 2018, compared to the same time last year. If online sales keep growing this way, retailers will more than ever need to be able to react fast in areas such as changing their prices instantly to make sure they aren’t second best or being undercut by a rival. This could also lead more manufacturers to having their own website to sell directly to consumers, and as a way to connect with consumers directly rather than through a retailer. Final Thoughts Overall, consumer confidence is an important indicator for retailers and manufacturers for current and future plans. With consumer confidence not improving, prices will need to be more attractive to get consumers to spend. Manufactures may need to take a leaf from Apple’s book and offer a high-end product at a more affordable price to entice consumers – as seen with the iPhone SE and iPhone XR. How retailers plan to entice consumers will be important to events like Black Friday and the Christmas period coming up. It is crucial that their promotions and pricing are well positioned, compared to competitor promotions, to make these events a success. On the plus side, with wages on the rise and consumers feeling that prices will increase if they wait too long, this could lead to a new wave of spending – especially with Brexit looming. The uncertainty could mean that consumers choose to spend now, rather than waiting to see what happens.
    • 08/20/18
    • Technology
    • Online Pricing Intelligence
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global
    • English

    What drives price movements of tech devices?

    It is a common assumption among consumers that the retail price of flagship tech devices and features will gradually drop over time. Moreover, it is often assumed that the release of new models accelerates the price decline for the, now obsolete, previous models. That means consumers often think it is better to wait a couple of months before buying the latest tech device. But how much is price affected? We looked at a huge range of online pricing over time, to answer this question.

    How far do the prices of tech devices and features really fall, over time?

    The worldwide TV market recently saw the introduction of exciting new display technologies, such as OLED and QLED. Looking at the average price of three 55 inch OLED/QLED TVs (Samsung, LG, Panasonic), we see that the average online price has fallen by 34% between October 2017 and July 2018. Other consumer electronics categories show similar trends, but to lesser extents. For example, the online retail price of a laptop featuring a Core i7 processor has fallen 8%, on average, since the beginning of the year. Similarly, the average price of a smart watch has fallen 6% year-on-year (YoY) to August 2018. Overall, there is a considerable degree of variation between different products, reflecting their peculiar product characteristics and strategies, but data suggests a general downward trend over time for ageing technology features.

    Do new model releases accelerate price declines for older models?

    Sim-free smartphones offer a great case study in this area. So, let’s look at the impact that the release of two flagship devices (Galaxy S9 and iPhone 8) had on the average online prices of previous models (Galaxy S8 and iPhone 7). The release of Samsung’s Galaxy S9 in March 2018 seems to have had a noticeable influence on the price of the Galaxy S8, which decreased 14% in the following 5 months. A similar, albeit weaker, dynamic applies to Apple. The iPhone 8 release in September 2017 induced a decline in the price of an iPhone 7 of 6% in the following 5 months. It is worth noting that the average online retail price of the Galaxy S8 and iPhone 7 does follows a long-term decline trend (the iPhone7 lost 7% and the Galaxy S8 lost 15% YoY, compared to July 2018 prices), but it seems clear that the release of new models certainly had an influence on price movements.

    However, this is only half of the story…

    The price variations we tracked during the considered period highlight a key contrast between the approaches of the two brands. Samsung’s device is subject to higher seasonal fluctuations, while Apple focuses on limited price variations in key periods (e.g. Black Friday). This shows that, although there is a long-term price trend in place, brand strategies and retail promotions can have a big influence on average prices and drive considerable discounts. This dynamic is even more apparent if we overlay the average online retail price and the lowest online retail price. We can see from the chart below how promotional prices can cut deep under average prices and anticipate the price decline trend by many months. For example, Galaxy S8’ lowest price touched £550 in November 2017, 6 months before the average price reached the same level.

    Conclusions

    The assumption is true, that there is a general trend of price decline over time key tech devices, which is influenced by the faster release of new and upgraded models. However, long-term price movements are also heavily influenced by brand strategies and retail promotions, which can drive deeper price cuts across a shorter amount of time. This has important implications for both consumers and marketers: For a consumer wanting to buy the latest technology or a newer model, looking out for key promotional periods is a better strategy than waiting for the price to drop over time. For Retailers and manufacturers bringing new technology and new ranges to market, the key lies in understanding consumers’ expectation that prices of older models will fall, and their consequent spending behaviour, based on that belief.
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