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Media Measurement

Consumers have more media content, channels and more choice of devices than ever before. Advertisers, media owners and media buyers need to identify which digital and traditional channels are most successful at attracting the right audiences. 

Our audience measurement solution is the trading currency for television (e.g. TV ratings), print, radio, out-of-home, online and mobile media. We track which consumers are using what channel, how they are engaging with content across each medium and what is driving their behavior.

With this detailed view of consumers’ content appreciation our clients not only get ratings of what people are watching or listening to – they also know why. Our cross-media measurement shows what devices your audiences are using for each channel and type of content, and we evaluate your marketing efficiency and performance across the whole spectrum of channels.

We help you optimize your channel selection and content to deliver increased audience engagement, end-to-end.

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Success Stories
  • Connecting the dots between digital and traditional media

    Connecting the dots between digital and traditional media

    15.03.2016

    We investigated the role of social media chatter in generating awareness and readership of Vanity Fair’s Caitlyn Jenner issue.

    Vanity Fair is an influential and iconic magazine published by Condé Nast.

    Situation

    Most media planners crave insight and data about how digital and traditional media can work together. The much talked about issue with Caitlyn Jenner on the cover offered us a perfect opportunity to explore this topic. We wanted to investigate what impact, if any, the social media buzz can have on the readership of the July issue in its traditional printed format.

    Approach

    Over a nine-week period, we surveyed 1,798 adults online who said they had read the July issue of Vanity Fair.

    Outcome

    • Four in ten adults who read the magazine first heard about the Jenner cover on social media
    • 40% of adults (ages 18+) who read the July issue had not read Vanity Fair in the previous 12 months
    • Nearly half (47%) of those readers were aged 18 and 34, indicating that the coveted millennials do read print magazines, contrary to the conventional wisdom
    • The big challenge for publishers is generating awareness among these younger readers – and it looks like social media can help with this

    Click here to download the success story

  • Optimizing TV content for a demanding audience

    Optimizing TV content for a demanding audience

    31.01.2016

    Our research helped this TV network shape its new television show featuring a Brazilian icon.

    Situation

    A broadcaster needed information about how viewers would respond to a popular entertainer’s return to the airwaves after a short absence. After the launch of the program, the company wanted to track the audience’s response to its format and content.

    Approach

    We explored social media conversations to determine which elements viewers might value in the show, and how these aligned with the host and the network. A subsequent quantitative study gauged the target audience’s intention of watching the program.

    After the launch, we tracked viewers’ behavior and opinions by integrating social media insights with audience data from the broadcaster and data from our online panel.

    Outcome

    We found that Brazilians were receptive to a new show because television program options during the evening time slot were limited.

    After the launch, we tracked user-generated content on social networks to see what elements of the show were resonating with the audience. This information helped producers strengthen the show’s content.

    Our advice also helped the commercial team to target sponsors with brands that would be a good match for the profile of the program and its audience.

    Click here to download our success story (short version)

    Click here to download our success story (long version)

     

     

Latest insights

Here you can find the latest Media Measurement insights. View all insights

    • 05/17/18
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    UK digital radio hits listening milestone: Time to turn off analogue FM or not?

    UK radio reached a significant milestone on 17 May 2018 when the RAJAR Q1 2018 listening figures were published. For the first time, over half (51%) of all weekly radio listening was via a digital platform, such as DAB (Digital Audio Broadcasting), online or through digital TV. In other words, more radio listening is now done through digital means than through analogue on FM.

    Why is this figure important?

    In 2009, the UK Government published its criteria for turning off the analogue FM signal and having only digital broadcast. Those were:
    • When 50% of listening is to digital; and
    • When national DAB coverage is comparable to FM coverage, and local DAB reaches 90% of the population and all major roads
    The Government’s intention was for these criteria to be met by the end of 2013, pushed by an industry ‘drive to digital’. Without this ‘drive to digital’, they expected digital radio listening to reach 50% organically by 2015. In fact, it has taken until 2018. The DAB standard for broadcasting digital audio services has been around in the UK since 1995, so one could say the 50% listening threshold has taken the UK almost 25 years to reach. Ultimately, the timetable was dictated by the listener. Although the UK has now (just) crept past this specific Government criterion, the UK has, in fact, already embraced digital radio. In an average week, well over half of the UK population (63%) do listen to some radio via digital means (known as ‘weekly reach’) – and our GfK data show that DAB radio set sales have declined by 26% in the last five years because most people have already replaced some or all of their analogue sets; or are listening through other digital means such as the Radioplayer app or ‘Alexa’.

    What happens now?

    Theoretically, the Government should now trigger the two-year migration process for turning off the FM signal by 2020. This feels unlikely. Both the public service (BBC) and commercial radio broadcasters prefer nothing to happen for the time being and to continue broadcasting on FM, as well as digital. This aversion to disrupting the market is felt especially in commercial radio, as they enjoy a relative buoyant period for advertising expenditure. The UK, and many other countries, will also be keenly observing listening trends in Norway, which underwent a digital radio switchover in 2017. Radio listening figures published so far in 2018 show an initial dip in overall listening followed by signs of a recovery. It has also benefitted the smaller and new stations to digital, who have captured around a third of all listening, and brought more choice to the Norwegian listener.

    Our forecast for the UK market: from collecting data to connecting data

    We believe that we’ll see plans put in place to gradually phase out analogue FM radio broadcasting; this is something the Swiss radio industry wants to happen in their market from 2020. This slow migration would suit a number of local stations whose share of digital radio listening is below 50% and who therefore, understandably, are not keen on losing the majority of their listening. This landmark digitization of radio may also provoke some movement in how radio audiences are measured. With more listening happening digitally, so the volume and granularity of listening data that can be captured increases. The emphasis will shift from collecting data to connecting data, such as online streaming or consumer behavior. GfK are already harnessing big (and small) datasets in several markets, such as the Measurement Innovation Program in Australia for radio, and integrating TV and online viewing in Sweden. As different markets operate at different speeds in their digitization journeys, so we recognize that media measurement needs to be tailored accordingly to maximize the value of the audience data to the stakeholders. Whether the FM signal gets turned off or not in the short term, this is a moment for celebration for the UK radio industry and for Digital Britain, and opens up exciting new opportunities for radio stations, for radio audience measurement and, most importantly, for the radio listener. John Carroll is Global Director Business Development, Media Measurement at GfK (@MediaCarroll)
    • 05/09/18
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    Smartphone shopping in Indonesia

    Smartphone shopping in Indonesia

    Indonesia is a growing market, which offers huge opportunities for consumer brands, tech and media companies. With over 250 million inhabitants, it is the world’s fourth most populous country and has millions of people rising into the middle class each year. Much of its internet access is smartphone-based, which makes it a lucrative market to study online mobile behavior. We run regular research looking at device use and online behavior in 14 countries. This is passively collected behavioral data, which creates an easy-to-use round-up of the cross-media metrics that matter. In this blog, we share some of the top trends in Indonesia. Indonesia smartphone users spent an average of 96 minutes on their handheld device per day during 2017. That is higher than UK, Germany, Poland, Russia, Brazil, Mexico or Spain. This usage is also growing – we measured a 15% rise in smartphone minutes across the year. This rapid growth of smartphone adoption has already been reported in publications such as Telegraph and Techcrunch.

    Smartphone use

    So how are Indonesians using their smartphone? By comparing minutes used per day across key categories, we can create a “share of clock” for smartphone use. Across the top five web categories, Indonesian smartphone users spent an average of 6.4 minutes per day on shopping sites during 2017. This figure is relatively high in Indonesia compared with other markets in keeping with growing smartphone use. Usage grew across the year, from around 6 minutes in the first 6 months to just under 7 minutes for the second half of the year. This is a key metric to watch in order to evaluate potential growth and assess season fluctuations. For example, shopping time grew to 7.5 minutes per day for Dec 2017. Shopping related websites also have one of the highest reach figures. An average of 92% of Indonesian smartphone users access shopping sites on a month-to-month basis versus other categories. So while players may spend more time per day on Gaming sites, for example, at 13.3 minutes the number who do so is around a third less at 62%. Almost 60% of Indonesian smartphone users visited online shopping sites 10 or more days per month and around a third (32.8%) visited shopping sites 20 days or more per month. The frequent visitation of these sites provides marketers with a great opportunity to engage with shoppers on a regular basis.


    Top 10 shopping sites or apps

    Drilling down to look at the most popular (defined by reach) shopping sites visited, Google Playstore leads the pack with (92%) followed by more local eCommerce sites Blibli and Lazada. Lazada seems to be benefitting from Alibaba’s investment and growth plans in Southeast Asia. Already we can see local sites competing strongly with global brands. Apps/sites such as Grab and Go-Jek, offering similar services to Uber are very popular. Google has started investing in Go-Jek, which in addition to taxis and motorbikes, also offers services like grocery delivery. Uber has dropped out of the Top 10 (although it was a top 10 player in January 2017) with Grab acquiring the company for its Southeast Asian operations earlier this year. Given the large amount of time Indonesian smartphone users spend each day on communication (32.6 minutes) and social networking (24 minutes) there is huge potential to create potential shopping opportunities. By using the latest online data measurement, we can help brands better understand the purchase journey of today’s mobile-first consumers and convert those clicks to sales. hbspt.cta.load(2405078, 'e4e11e43-32ab-45c0-bf7b-830df0dcf7f9', {});

    About the data

    GfK has developed digital behavioral panels in 14 markets around the world. Panellists allow us to passively follow their digital behavior across their devices – desktop, tablets and smartphones – in order to explore patterns of behavior. The Crossmedia Visualizer tool enables clients to mine the information collected within these panels to develop a view into how consumers are spending their time online. This provides insights into creating strategies to further engage and connect with these consumers. For this analysis, we focused on data from Indonesian smartphone users and how they spend their time online for January to December 2017. For a broader snapshot of device use for January 2018 please download our free sample report.across 8 diverse markets: Germany, Mexico, UK, Poland, Russia, Indonesia, Brazil and Netherlands.
    • 02/07/18
    • Technology
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    How will blockchain play a part in the future of media currencies?

    As the old saying goes: making predictions is always difficult, especially about the future. However, here is a given: there will be a lot more discussion about blockchain over the coming year. So many people have different views on how blockchain will affect the marketing and advertising industry that the potential applications of this nascent technology seem almost limitless. So instead of gazing too hard and long into our crystal balls, perhaps now is a good time to take stock and focus on some of the more realistic developments and what they mean for the industry. Following an in-depth review with leading industry stakeholders1, about how media currencies might look in five years, we discussed how blockchain might work and how it would change the way we do business. Previously published in MediaTel, we looked at the case for “The rise of the Super JICs” and a companion piece, “Chaos replaces order” in which tech drives a more anarchic, decentralized future scenario. Here we take a deeper look at how blockchain technology might be applied to the ad industry and how that might affect the future of media currencies.

    Firstly, what is blockchain?

    In essence, blockchain is a new way to store information. It is a digital record of all transactions related to a product or service. These transactions are recorded and shared among a secure, decentralized network of stakeholders. Certain attributes make blockchain technology particularly attractive to the advertising industry. It is immutable – “blocks” of transactions are continuously time-stamped and verified by the network; and once added no single party can alter it. It is shared – every party in the network can see everything, creating a transparent, “single version of the truth”. It is secure – it is encrypted so that only those agreed parties in the network can access it. At this early stage of adoption, many have been quick to jump on the blockchain bandwagon, resulting in some quite far-fetched applications which the industry may never embrace. However, some interesting opportunities were discussed at our roundtable, which could be exploited sooner rather than later. Two broad applications immediately spring to mind:
    • The regulating of agreements for buying and selling ad inventory
    • Increased consumer control over the content they are exposed to. Could blockchain replace ad blocking?
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    Regulating the transaction of ad inventory

    Given the current issues around the “murky” supply chain in digital, it would seem that blockchain protocols are ideally placed to help provide greater transparency and accountability.
    • They could be used to regulate the agreements made between advertisers and publishers and the myriad of third parties that make up the supply chain
    • They would record all the transactions at every stage of the process
    • Only agreed parties would have access to the blockchain and be able to execute what is in the blockchain
    • All transactions would be transparent to the network
    The clearer governance that blockchain provides would no doubt go a long way to stamp out fraudulent activity such as kick-backs and arbitrage, since any re-selling of inventory would need to be agreed by the whole network. So the increased transparency would help negotiation of deals, and also help to regulate agreed contracts. Everyone in the chain would know what they have agreed to and what is delivered. One question, however, is how disputes might be settled if there are disagreements. Digital ads are executed in fractions of a second, but blockchain is much slower – so it is difficult to see real-time verification any time soon. However, it could still be a very useful post-campaign validation tool, but timestamping needs to be accurate to the millisecond, in order to marry financial transaction with ad delivery. This area also presents many additional interesting applications, if blockchain is opened up further to include consumers.

    Could blockchain replace ad blocking?

    In the future, consumers could be given more control over the type of campaigns and content they want to be exposed to. Consumers could choose which blockchain networks they want to be a part of and hence what content and ads they receive. This would place more power in the hands of the advertisers who can create deeper relationships with their customers. An added benefit to this could be a significant reduction of ad blocking because instead of blocking ads from certain platforms, the consumer can choose which advertising they want to receive. Ultimately, brands could only interact with consumers as part of agreed networks in the blockchain. Other areas of development in this area could be to verify activity and blacklist against fraudulent sites and non-human traffic. Blockchain would guarantee the validity of clicks between consumers and advertisers on verified sites. However, there are two key issues here. Firstly, one of trust: will consumers believe their data is secure and that brands will only execute on what has been agreed? Secondly, for everything to join up, there needs to be widespread adoption — multiple suppliers along the chain need to sign on the blockchain to make this work.

    Our conclusion

    We clearly have a long way to go before we get to this point – probably at least five years – but the incentives are there. If we can create a transparent supply chain, reduce ad fraud, reduce ad blocking and provide the protocols for greater accountability, then blockchain becomes a very attractive proposition. However, it’s worth bearing in mind that blockchain is unlikely to replace the media measurement systems we currently have in place. Blockchain won’t create ratings, segments, impressions and reach. Rather, it will verify whether targets have been met and confirm payment. So while blockchain promises much change, the building blocks of media measurement will remain subject to their own evolution, as outlined in our previous two opinion pieces. hbspt.cta.load(2405078, 'a152c586-99ec-484f-b429-dd8155224115', {}); Footnotes: 1How it all started: voices from across the industry. GfK and IAB Europe invited industry representatives to a round table discussion on how media measurement might look in five years’ time. Participants included: digital platforms Google, Facebook and Oath; global ad agencies Publicis and Dentsu; media owners from broadcast TV and digital; a programmatic audience platform; a national advertising association and the German JIC (Joint Industry Committee) for TV audience research, AGF.  It is the first time we have been able to discuss these issues with such a broad group and, from the ensuing debate, three possible scenarios for the future became apparent:
    • The rise of the “Super JIC” as reinvigorated, neutral data arbiters
    • Chaos replaces order, with data being controlled by different competing entities large and small
    • Technological self-regulation of data, likely in the form of an adaptation of Blockchain technology
    • 01/18/18
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    Why is cross-media so important?

    Why do we need to track consumers across all channels and devices? Why can’t we just track their behaviour on one device, for example? Well, the answer is that we can, but then we’d be getting a false view of their real behaviour. We’d only see one aspect of how, where and why they are interacting with your own, or your competitors’, promotional content, products or services. A typical customer journey usually involves many stages from discovery to purchase, using many different touchpoints across multiple devices. Unless we analyse all of those data traces, we will not get a truly accurate single consumer view. The challenge is to think ‘cross-media’ right from the start, and to break up silos by using digital as the connector.

    Recent cross-media trends from 8 countries:

    We run regular research looking at device use and online behaviour in 15 countries. This is passively collected behavioural data, which creates a valuable and easy-to-use round-up of the cross-media metrics that matter. In this blog, we’ll share some top trends from eight very different markets: Germany, Mexico, UK, Poland, Russia, Indonesia, Brazil and Netherlands. hbspt.cta.load(2405078, '6bd01b10-fc09-4b4c-9251-70a83828189a', {});

    4 cross-media trends from our full report

    1. Multi device is the norm What is abundantly clear is that tracking data from single device use cannot provide a full enough picture to be reliable or truly useable. While we track the use of smartphones, tablets and PCs, it is interesting to see how these devices are used in combination. For example, how many smartphone users also use tablet and/or PC? Singular device usage still exists, but nearly three quarters of the online population in the eight markets we have analysed use at least two or more devices There is a higher percentage of single device use in some emerging markets. For example, in Indonesia, almost 4 in 10 (37%) of the online population use smartphone only. This is largely due to limited availability of fast landline internet, so that desktops and PCs have not penetrated the market in the same way as in Europe. The price decrease for smartphones and cheap data has been much faster than investments in landline infrastructure. Not only is a high share of mobile usage for smartphones, but also smartphones and tablets – 28% of the online population in Indonesia use these two devices combined. In addition, Poland stands out as having the highest percentage of PC-only users (30%) compared to the on other markets. However, in a developed market such as the UK, nearly 4 in 10 (39%) of the online population use smartphone, PC and tablet, while only 7% use tablet and PC. In Italy, half the online population use both PCs and smartphones. 2. Most popular online activities – by country, and by device Based on net reach, the top activity that people perform across all devices (PCs, smartphones and tablets) is reading news or information, or accessing search sites. The exceptions for this are Indonesia, where shopping is the top activity across all devices, and Brazil, where communication is most popular. In Brazil, communication apps are particularly popular for messaging and emailing. When we view devices separately, there is clear division in use between PCs and mobile devices. People are using PCs for reading news or information and performing web searches, and using their tablet or smartphone for communication and shopping. A key takeout here is that shopping is the top activity on mobile devices in four out of the eight countries, highlighting the importance of mobile advertising for eCommerce and in-store shopping in these markets. This prevalence of mobile highlights the importance of mobile-enabled webpages and apps with good UX to support eCommerce. 3. Looking at duration shows key differences between countries Looking at duration of activity (average hours per month, per user) for each category, we see that social networking and communication are the top ranked categories in terms of time spent across all three devices. However, there is a lot of variation between the different countries. For example, ‘communication’ is the top activity on mobile devices in both Indonesia and Germany. But in Indonesia, the duration is 27 hours – compared to 16.4 hours in Germany. And people in Mexico spend more than twice as much time on social networking as people in Poland (30.3 hours compared to 14.6 hours, respectively). By looking at duration, we also see that, while we are all addicted to our smartphones, this is especially true in certain countries. In Poland, the average online user spends 34 hour per month on their smartphone – but in Netherlands this rises to nearly double that, at 64 hours per month. 4. Most-used websites and apps (based on reach) It’s probably no surprise to see that Google is the number one most-used website or app, based on reach, in seven of the eight countries presented in this blog. The exception is Russia, where Yandex takes the top spot (Yandex is a similar platform to Google which includes Yandex Search, Yandex Mail, Yandex Maps, Yandex Images, Yandex News etc, and even includes a taxi app very similar to Uber). Similarly, Facebook is the number one social network site, except for Russia where it is VKontakte (VK). When it comes to streaming, however, the top site is the same across all eight countries: YouTube.

    Achieving a single customer view

    Integrating data from all sources in one platform allows us to connect the dots and gain a true picture of our consumers. Ultimately, data trails are generated by real people that leave data in many different silos. Digital is the connecter that helps open these silos as all the data traces are left in the digital world. By opening these silos and integrating data from different sources we can achieve that all important single customer view. Pawel Gershkovich is a Global Senior Product Manager at GfK. To share your thoughts, please email pawel.gershkovich@gfk.com or leave a comment below. hbspt.cta.load(2405078, '6bd01b10-fc09-4b4c-9251-70a83828189a', {});
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