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Smart insights: Media and Entertainment

The media and entertainment industry is experiencing rapid transformation. This offers significant opportunities for those broadcasters, publishers, content advertising agencies, and content and digital platform owners who can understand the impact of this change.

Today, an audience of many is becoming an audience of one, forcing the media industry to become more data-driven. Media and digital groups need to understand changing patterns of consumption, including what programs and content are viewed across digital and traditional channels, as well as other content sources. 

Our media and entertainment research experts provide insight into what content is being consumed on which channels and devices, and why. We convert big cross-media data into smart, relevant research insights by using our unrivaled analytical, data science and technological expertise to integrate and interpret multiple data sets.

GfK’s own unique data sets include proprietary audience, consumer and retail data (for example Video on Demand (VOD), DVDs, music, books, video games and consoles). This allows us to measure media consumption, advertising efficiency and content appeal. By capturing, analyzing and translating media consumption across channels, platforms and devices, we help you build and execute winning business strategies.

Success Stories
  • Providing comprehensive product information for a hi-fi publication

    Providing comprehensive product information for a hi-fi publication

    16.08.2016

    Our catalog enables our client to offer comprehensive and authoritative product listings through its online publications.

    Situation

    Our client publishes a magazine for buyers and lovers of home audiovisual systems. In its move toward digital publishing, it wanted to keep its website readers engaged by providing technical specifications for most products in its listings. The company also wanted to minimize the costs and resources required to gather and manage the content, preferring that its staff focus on core publishing activities.

    Approach

    We provided the magazine with a subscription to our authoritative product catalog data. This gives the organization detailed, accurate and standardized technical specifications, product images and marketing text covering most audiovisual products in the market. Our product data is updated daily and is built on data drawn directly from manufacturers and distributors.

    Outcome

    The publication now offers its readers up-to-date, accurate and detailed product information alongside its editorial reviews. This adds value for readers and entrenches the publication’s place as the most comprehensive source of information about home entertainment systems.

    Our catalog:

    • allows the client to easily offer product listings without the costs of capturing the data manually
    • enables the publisher to focus on its core business even as it builds out new online services for its readers
    • offers data even for niche brands and manufacturers

    Click here to download our success story

  • Cross-device usage study optimizes campaign planning

    Cross-device usage study optimizes campaign planning

    02.06.2016

    Facebook asked us to explore how consumers use computing devices and how they switch between them for different tasks during the day.

    Facebook’s mission is to give people the power to share and make the world more open and connected.

    Situation

    Facebook wanted to explore how people use different devices for different tasks during the day and how they switch between them. This information could help its advertisers target customers with greater precision.

    Approach

    We combined a quantitative online survey with qualitative in-depth analysis to understand consumers’ behavior, attitudes and opinions about the devices they use to access online content and services. We used geographical location tracking to analyze which activities they were most likely to do while away from their homes.

    Outcome

    We discovered that almost half of the adults in the UK and the US sometimes begin an activity on one device and finish it on another. This suggests that marketers must reach their audiences across all platforms with a consistent brand experience. With single log-in sites like Facebook, they can avoid sending the same messages to prospective customers on their different devices.

    The research highlighted the most important reasons for people switching from one device to another: comfort and convenience; urgency; the time it takes to complete a task; security and privacy; and the complexity of the information the user needs to input to complete the task. Actions associated with a purchase journey frequently trigger a consumer’s decision to switch devices.

    Click here to download our success story (short version)

    Click here to download our success story (long version)

    Global careers
    Human Resources
  • Connecting the dots between digital and traditional media

    Connecting the dots between digital and traditional media

    15.03.2016

    We investigated the role of social media chatter in generating awareness and readership of Vanity Fair’s Caitlyn Jenner issue.

    Vanity Fair is an influential and iconic magazine published by Condé Nast.

    Situation

    Most media planners crave insight and data about how digital and traditional media can work together. The much talked about issue with Caitlyn Jenner on the cover offered us a perfect opportunity to explore this topic. We wanted to investigate what impact, if any, the social media buzz can have on the readership of the July issue in its traditional printed format.

    Approach

    Over a nine-week period, we surveyed 1,798 adults online who said they had read the July issue of Vanity Fair.

    Outcome

    • Four in ten adults who read the magazine first heard about the Jenner cover on social media
    • 40% of adults (ages 18+) who read the July issue had not read Vanity Fair in the previous 12 months
    • Nearly half (47%) of those readers were aged 18 and 34, indicating that the coveted millennials do read print magazines, contrary to the conventional wisdom
    • The big challenge for publishers is generating awareness among these younger readers – and it looks like social media can help with this

    Click here to download the success story

  • Optimizing TV content for a demanding audience

    Optimizing TV content for a demanding audience

    31.01.2016

    Our research helped this TV network shape its new television show featuring a Brazilian icon.

    Situation

    A broadcaster needed information about how viewers would respond to a popular entertainer’s return to the airwaves after a short absence. After the launch of the program, the company wanted to track the audience’s response to its format and content.

    Approach

    We explored social media conversations to determine which elements viewers might value in the show, and how these aligned with the host and the network. A subsequent quantitative study gauged the target audience’s intention of watching the program.

    After the launch, we tracked viewers’ behavior and opinions by integrating social media insights with audience data from the broadcaster and data from our online panel.

    Outcome

    We found that Brazilians were receptive to a new show because television program options during the evening time slot were limited.

    After the launch, we tracked user-generated content on social networks to see what elements of the show were resonating with the audience. This information helped producers strengthen the show’s content.

    Our advice also helped the commercial team to target sponsors with brands that would be a good match for the profile of the program and its audience.

    Click here to download our success story (short version)

    Click here to download our success story (long version)

     

     

Latest insights

Here you can find the latest insights for media and entertainment industry. View all insights

    • 11/15/18
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Financial Services
    • Industrial Goods
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Travel and Hospitality
    • Automotive
    • Consumer Goods
    • Energy
    • Geomarketing
    • Geodata
    • Picture of the month
    • Global
    • English

    Map of the Month: GfK Purchasing Power, Europe 2018

    GfK's Map of the Month for November shows the distribution of purchasing power across Europe in 2018.
    • 10/29/18
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Financial Services
    • Industrial Goods
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Travel and Hospitality
    • Automotive
    • Consumer Goods
    • Energy
    • Geomarketing
    • Geodata
    • Digital Maps
    • Digital Maps
    • Global
    • English

    GfK releases updated maps for all of Europe

    GfK has released its Europe Map Edition 2018/2019, which includes thousands of changes to Europe's regions.
    • 10/18/18
    • Automotive
    • Geomarketing
    • Geodata
    • Picture of the month
    • Global
    • English

    Map of the Month: Purchasing power for new automobiles, Germany 2018

    GfK's Map of the Month for October illustrates the distribution of 2018 purchasing power for new automobiles in Germany.
    • 09/06/18
    • Automotive
    • Global
    • English

    Driving Gen Z

    Turn back the clock a handful of years and you’ll find automotive strategists bearish that Millennials’ lack of interest in vehicle ownership will usher in the slow, but inevitable, decline of the car industry. Yet, today, 29% of new vehicles are already being bought by Millennials. In just a few years, despite accounting for only a quarter of the population, our largest generation at 80 million will account for 40% of new car sales. And they’ll just be entering their prime earning years at that point. Naturally, Millennials will be the sales focal point for quite some time. However, manufacturers are already looking towards the next generation of American drivers. Known as Post-Millennial or Gen Z, they’re roughly 8 to 20 years old today and expected to be 75+ million strong. With the vast majority still in school or living at home, innovation for tomorrow begins with insights unearthed today. GfK Consumer Life has been tracking the emergence of this young generation for some time, and we’ve identified several themes that will yield challenges, but also opportunities, for manufacturers.

    Ambitious, yet pragmatic

    As previously outlined, the post-Millennial generation is as focused on accomplishment, if not more, than on self-discovery. Financial independence is their primary goal today. In fact, 80% want to stay away from debt completely, according to research from GfK Consumer Life. And as they watched Millennials before them struggle with mounting college debt, 54% have already taken jobs to earn money for college, while 85% plan to work during their college years. Arguably the strongest advantage today’s teens have compared to Millennials is a robust economy. In retrospect, the timing of the Great Recession (along with historically high gas prices in 2008) as Millennials transitioned to adulthood had the most profound impact on their attitudes towards vehicle ownership. With unemployment reaching an 18-year low earlier this year, upcoming graduates may find a more lucrative job market, and access to transportation more affordable. In fact, after a short dip during the recession, Americans are now driving more miles with more vehicles than ever before. While it’s impossible to predict the next recession, manufacturers and retailers should expect the next generation to transition more seamlessly (and perhaps earlier) into adulthood. They may be shopping your brand sooner, rather than later – if, of course, the product is right.

    Seamless mobility

    You won’t just be selling cars to this generation, you’ll provide them access to fully integrated mobile platforms that eliminate the gap between in- and out-of-car experiences. Today, it’s connected car features – from smartphone integration to streaming services to mobile wifi. Yet, smart devices are second nature to them (1 in 3 are already using mobile voice command), and GfK Consumer Life has found that they’re already 50% more likely than the average American to be controlling smart home or smart car devices and features from their phone. Manufacturers will need to work hard and fast to integrate vehicles into their internet of Things. Whether it’s warming up the oven or conducting mobile video conferences on the drive home from work, or ordering food or vacation planning while in transit (as GM recently introduced with its mobile Marketplace), this generation will demand the absolute elimination of transit “dead time.”

    Multi-mobile

    Of course, ‘buying’ may not be their prerogative. The fiscal savvy of this age group will place greater emphasis on building a flexible transportation portfolio, which may include any number of public, shared, or owned vehicles and services. According to GfK Consumer Life’s most recent 2018 data, teens are just as likely to use public transportation as Millennials (20%), yet less than half as likely (15% vs. 27%) to have used car sharing services. However, on the latter, they are already well ahead of Gen X (11%) and the Boomers (4%) before them. Not surprising, manufacturers are moving aggressively on this front. Subscription models from luxury brands are being tested regionally. Yet, with significant pricing premiums attached to such programs, viability beyond the most affluent is still in question. Gen Z may provide the scale to take these programs mainstream. In fact, they’re already catching up to Millennials on interest in vehicle subscription services (39% vs. 41%), and ahead on shared ownership (32% vs. 28%), despite being novice drivers.

    Security first

    Growing up in the aftermath of 9/11, countless school shootings (active shooter drills are now commonplace in our K-12 schools), and too-many-to-count data privacy breaches, manufacturers can expect this generation to take a more cautionary, yet demanding approach to personal safety and security. According to GfK MRI’s American Teen Study, they are more likely to rate safety in an accident higher relative to fun to drive, compared to Millennials as teens in 2011. Today, 42% view proactive safety systems as important, while 46% are also seeking features that protect from environmental hazards. In fact, according to GfK’s Automotive Innovation and Technology Study, Gen Z are almost three times as likely as average respondents to be seeking wellness solutions that go beyond active and passive safety systems. Beyond physical safety, auto manufacturers might find it more challenging to access and leverage Gen Z’s digital footprint compared to Millennials before them. These teens are sharing less personal information online, with only 31% keeping social pages updated (vs. 45% in 2009). Only 44% are willing to share personal data, even in exchange for benefits and rewards (compared to 62% of Millennials). According to GfK MRI, they are also more than twice as likely as Millennials to embrace the privacy of Snapchat (75% vs 37%), reinforcing their need for secure channels. As the first post-digital generation, they have also identified the limitations of social media and are re-investing in personal interactions. In fact, 3 of 4 are choosing smaller groups of friends over large groups of acquaintances, while a study from IBM suggests that Gen Z is placing as much importance on offline socializing as online. This social recalibration will be an invitation for brands to develop trusted one-to-one relationships with their next generation of clients. Leveraging the convenience of mobile technology, manufacturers such as Lincoln are adding concierge services for a decidedly personal touch to the entire life of the ownership experience. While these are generally reserved for premium brands and consumers today, such offline approaches may well suit the next young buyers seeking a brand connection – one that’s equally digital and analog.

    The road ahead

    While Millennials are center stage for now, the next consumer wave is right around the corner. As it stands, the future looks bright for Gen Z, and especially for those manufacturers who have begun to shine a light on them.
Solutions
  • Consumer Panels

    Consumer Panels

    Your business is all about your consumers. So understanding them is essential in ensuring your products and services meet their needs, and in identifying opportunities for growth.

    Our international consumer panel data and research expertise provide you with smart customer insights into who your consumers are, their attitudes and behaviors, across channels.

  • Media Measurement

    Media Measurement

    Consumers have more media content, channels and more choice of devices than ever before.

    Advertisers, media owners and media buyers need to identify which digital and traditional channels are most successful at attracting the right audiences.

  • Point of Sales Tracking

    Point of Sales Tracking

    Retailers and manufacturers are under pressure to develop products and services that maximize sales and profit and to keep customers coming back.

    Success relies on having the most up-to-date sales data, combined with robust analysis to understand which products and services are performing well in the market – and which are not. With this information, clients can set clear strategies for commercial growth and increase return on investment.

  • Shopper

    Shopper

    Digital continues to open up new paths to purchase, changing how and where people shop. More and more data becomes available every day, as shoppers embrace multi-channel brand experiences. To stay competitive in this big data, multi-channel environment, businesses need to identify and leverage the most relevant data along the entire path to purchase. 

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