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Misurazione dell'audience e Insight

Oggi i consumatori hanno a disposizione contenuti multimediali, canali e scelta di dispositivi differenti come mai in passato.

Le agenzie pubblicitarie, i proprietari di Media e gli acquirenti di Media devono essere in grado di identificare quali canali digitali e tradizionali sono più efficaci per attrarre le audience giuste.

La nostra soluzione di misurazione dell'audience copre non solo i Media televisivi (per es. rating TV), ma anche stampa, radio, i mobile Media, gli online Media, e gli out-of-home. Siamo in grado di stabilire chi utilizza cosa, quali consumatori utilizzano i diversi tipi di canali, in che modo interagiscono con i contenuti sui vari Media e quali motivazioni sottendono ai loro comportamenti.

Grazie a questa visuale dettagliata, i nostri Clienti sono in grado di stabilire non solo i rating relativi ai contenuti guardati o ascoltati dai Consumatori ma anche i motivi di fruizione degli stessi. Le nostre misurazioni cross-media mostrano quali dispositivi vengono usati dall'audience del Cliente per ciascun canale e tipo di contenuti. Inoltre, valutiamo l'efficienza del marketing e la performance sull'intero spettro dei canali.

Aiutiamo i nostri Clienti a ottimizzare la scelta dei canali e dei contenuti per ottenere un maggiore coinvolgimento dell'audience a 360°.

Latest insights

Here you can find the latest Media Measurement insights. View all insights

    • 08/02/16
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Italy
    • Italian

    Il futuro della misurazione dei media

    L'industria dei media sta vivendo un periodo di evoluzione accelerata e continua. Per questo è fondamentale rimanere sempre aggiornati sui modelli di consumo dei media, attuali e futuri. Noi possiamo aiutarvi a migliorare le vostre performance, sia che dobbiate misurare l'efficacia di una pubblicità, sviluppare dei contenuti oppure studiare il livello di fedeltà dei vostri consumatori. Venite a scoprire perché i nostri esperti continuano ad essere in prima linea nella misurazione dei media a livello globale.
    • 07/19/18
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Technology
    • Media Measurement
    • Consumer Panels
    • Point of Sales Tracking
    • Global
    • English

    09/01/18
    Join GfK at IFA 2018: Providing answers in a disruptive world

    Discover how we are developing a sophisticated ecosystem that will be powered by integrated data and artificial intelligence. 
    • 05/17/18
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    UK digital radio hits listening milestone: Time to turn off analogue FM or not?

    UK radio reached a significant milestone on 17 May 2018 when the RAJAR Q1 2018 listening figures were published. For the first time, over half (51%) of all weekly radio listening was via a digital platform, such as DAB (Digital Audio Broadcasting), online or through digital TV. In other words, more radio listening is now done through digital means than through analogue on FM.

    Why is this figure important?

    In 2009, the UK Government published its criteria for turning off the analogue FM signal and having only digital broadcast. Those were:
    • When 50% of listening is to digital; and
    • When national DAB coverage is comparable to FM coverage, and local DAB reaches 90% of the population and all major roads
    The Government’s intention was for these criteria to be met by the end of 2013, pushed by an industry ‘drive to digital’. Without this ‘drive to digital’, they expected digital radio listening to reach 50% organically by 2015. In fact, it has taken until 2018. The DAB standard for broadcasting digital audio services has been around in the UK since 1995, so one could say the 50% listening threshold has taken the UK almost 25 years to reach. Ultimately, the timetable was dictated by the listener. Although the UK has now (just) crept past this specific Government criterion, the UK has, in fact, already embraced digital radio. In an average week, well over half of the UK population (63%) do listen to some radio via digital means (known as ‘weekly reach’) – and our GfK data show that DAB radio set sales have declined by 26% in the last five years because most people have already replaced some or all of their analogue sets; or are listening through other digital means such as the Radioplayer app or ‘Alexa’.

    What happens now?

    Theoretically, the Government should now trigger the two-year migration process for turning off the FM signal by 2020. This feels unlikely. Both the public service (BBC) and commercial radio broadcasters prefer nothing to happen for the time being and to continue broadcasting on FM, as well as digital. This aversion to disrupting the market is felt especially in commercial radio, as they enjoy a relative buoyant period for advertising expenditure. The UK, and many other countries, will also be keenly observing listening trends in Norway, which underwent a digital radio switchover in 2017. Radio listening figures published so far in 2018 show an initial dip in overall listening followed by signs of a recovery. It has also benefitted the smaller and new stations to digital, who have captured around a third of all listening, and brought more choice to the Norwegian listener.

    Our forecast for the UK market: from collecting data to connecting data

    We believe that we’ll see plans put in place to gradually phase out analogue FM radio broadcasting; this is something the Swiss radio industry wants to happen in their market from 2020. This slow migration would suit a number of local stations whose share of digital radio listening is below 50% and who therefore, understandably, are not keen on losing the majority of their listening. This landmark digitization of radio may also provoke some movement in how radio audiences are measured. With more listening happening digitally, so the volume and granularity of listening data that can be captured increases. The emphasis will shift from collecting data to connecting data, such as online streaming or consumer behavior. GfK are already harnessing big (and small) datasets in several markets, such as the Measurement Innovation Program in Australia for radio, and integrating TV and online viewing in Sweden. As different markets operate at different speeds in their digitization journeys, so we recognize that media measurement needs to be tailored accordingly to maximize the value of the audience data to the stakeholders. Whether the FM signal gets turned off or not in the short term, this is a moment for celebration for the UK radio industry and for Digital Britain, and opens up exciting new opportunities for radio stations, for radio audience measurement and, most importantly, for the radio listener. John Carroll is Global Director Business Development, Media Measurement at GfK (@MediaCarroll)
    • 05/09/18
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    Smartphone shopping in Indonesia

    Smartphone shopping in Indonesia

    Indonesia is a growing market, which offers huge opportunities for consumer brands, tech and media companies. With over 250 million inhabitants, it is the world’s fourth most populous country and has millions of people rising into the middle class each year. Much of its internet access is smartphone-based, which makes it a lucrative market to study online mobile behavior. We run regular research looking at device use and online behavior in 14 countries. This is passively collected behavioral data, which creates an easy-to-use round-up of the cross-media metrics that matter. In this blog, we share some of the top trends in Indonesia. Indonesia smartphone users spent an average of 96 minutes on their handheld device per day during 2017. That is higher than UK, Germany, Poland, Russia, Brazil, Mexico or Spain. This usage is also growing – we measured a 15% rise in smartphone minutes across the year. This rapid growth of smartphone adoption has already been reported in publications such as Telegraph and Techcrunch.

    Smartphone use

    So how are Indonesians using their smartphone? By comparing minutes used per day across key categories, we can create a “share of clock” for smartphone use. Across the top five web categories, Indonesian smartphone users spent an average of 6.4 minutes per day on shopping sites during 2017. This figure is relatively high in Indonesia compared with other markets in keeping with growing smartphone use. Usage grew across the year, from around 6 minutes in the first 6 months to just under 7 minutes for the second half of the year. This is a key metric to watch in order to evaluate potential growth and assess season fluctuations. For example, shopping time grew to 7.5 minutes per day for Dec 2017. Shopping related websites also have one of the highest reach figures. An average of 92% of Indonesian smartphone users access shopping sites on a month-to-month basis versus other categories. So while players may spend more time per day on Gaming sites, for example, at 13.3 minutes the number who do so is around a third less at 62%. Almost 60% of Indonesian smartphone users visited online shopping sites 10 or more days per month and around a third (32.8%) visited shopping sites 20 days or more per month. The frequent visitation of these sites provides marketers with a great opportunity to engage with shoppers on a regular basis.


    Top 10 shopping sites or apps

    Drilling down to look at the most popular (defined by reach) shopping sites visited, Google Playstore leads the pack with (92%) followed by more local eCommerce sites Blibli and Lazada. Lazada seems to be benefitting from Alibaba’s investment and growth plans in Southeast Asia. Already we can see local sites competing strongly with global brands. Apps/sites such as Grab and Go-Jek, offering similar services to Uber are very popular. Google has started investing in Go-Jek, which in addition to taxis and motorbikes, also offers services like grocery delivery. Uber has dropped out of the Top 10 (although it was a top 10 player in January 2017) with Grab acquiring the company for its Southeast Asian operations earlier this year. Given the large amount of time Indonesian smartphone users spend each day on communication (32.6 minutes) and social networking (24 minutes) there is huge potential to create potential shopping opportunities. By using the latest online data measurement, we can help brands better understand the purchase journey of today’s mobile-first consumers and convert those clicks to sales. hbspt.cta.load(2405078, 'e4e11e43-32ab-45c0-bf7b-830df0dcf7f9', {});

    About the data

    GfK has developed digital behavioral panels in 14 markets around the world. Panellists allow us to passively follow their digital behavior across their devices – desktop, tablets and smartphones – in order to explore patterns of behavior. The Crossmedia Visualizer tool enables clients to mine the information collected within these panels to develop a view into how consumers are spending their time online. This provides insights into creating strategies to further engage and connect with these consumers. For this analysis, we focused on data from Indonesian smartphone users and how they spend their time online for January to December 2017. For a broader snapshot of device use for January 2018 please download our free sample report.across 8 diverse markets: Germany, Mexico, UK, Poland, Russia, Indonesia, Brazil and Netherlands.
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