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    • 12/12/17
    • Health
    • Global
    • English

    Five ways brand teams can align messages and touchpoints for greater commercial effectiveness

    Commercial effectiveness 2.0

    Now that many biopharma companies have turned their focus to professional and patient centricity, and even more have upped their game by using multiple, specialized experience points to serve doctors and patients better, it is time to bring the new approach to maturity by increasing coordination and effectiveness in the new multi-channel models.

    How will you meet the challenges of this new pharma/biotech commercial model?  We would like to share five ways to improve the metrics and analytics that help you optimize your combined sales force, touchpoints and message recall, and meet the challenges of this new pharma/biotech commercial model. Depending on your current business challenges, at least one approach is very likely to help you as we move into this new biopharma commercial model.

    hbspt.cta.load(2405078, '0f906aac-4b90-4ec5-b47a-d8d775e8194b', {});

    Five of our analytical approaches to set the wheels in motion:

    1. Improve the measurement of your competitive standing with a multidimensional share of voice

    While you may be winning share of voice with reps alone, you may be falling behind in the overall race. Consider tracking your multidimensional touchpoint reach for a more holistic and accurate guidepost.

    2. Coordinate multiple touchpoints, with the sales rep at the center

    Biopharma’s use of multichannel to reach no-see physicians has matured. Now, forward-leaning marketing and sales leaders are leveraging “rep- triggering” technology to meet customer needs. Fully leverage reps’ clearer perspective of physicians’ imperatives, and empower reps to meet customer needs. Then measure the commercial impact of the new multi-touchpoint experience.

    3. Combine the optimal set of touchpoints to improve the overall customer experience

    The needs of healthcare professionals (HCPs) are increasingly complicated. Use multi-touchpoint analytics to find the combination of touchpoints that does the best job of meeting those crucially important customer needs.

    4. Focus on impactful messages for greater impact on prescribing behavior

    Reach doesn’t matter if the message isn’t relevant. And a high-impact message that isn’t remembered is a lost opportunity. Many brands still focus too much on the percent of physicians who recall messages. In celebrating the success of high recall for some messages, they forget to test each message’s impact, and then they miss the insight that recall may be the lowest on messages that have the greatest impact on prescribing behavior.

    5. Concentrate marketing investments on the most effective touchpoints for your critical messages

    Each touchpoint can have a higher or lower transmission effectiveness for your critical messages. Brand teams and sales forces need to remember to assess their portfolio of touchpoints with regard to their effectiveness in transmitting key messages. Message transmission lets brand teams focus their investments on those touchpoints that get critical messages across to the physicians who need to know.

    Begin driving commercial effectiveness for your brand

    By applying our techniques, you’ll discover how you can align messages and touchpoints to optimize their impact.

    For a deeper dive into these five techniques for driving your brand’s commercial effectiveness, download our white paper, “Five ways brand teams can align messages and touchpoints for greater commercial effectiveness”.

    hbspt.cta.load(2405078, '0f906aac-4b90-4ec5-b47a-d8d775e8194b', {});

    Then let’s start a conversation so we can help guide you in the process.

    Tom Hartley is Senior Vice President of GfK’s Health business. He can be reached at tom.hartley@gfk.com.

    • 12/12/17
    • Health
    • South Africa
    • English

    Five ways brand teams can align messages and touchpoints for greater commercial effectiveness

    Commercial effectiveness 2.0

    Now that many biopharma companies have turned their focus to professional and patient centricity, and even more have upped their game by using multiple, specialized experience points to serve doctors and patients better, it is time to bring the new approach to maturity by increasing coordination and effectiveness in the new multi-channel models.

    How will you meet the challenges of this new pharma/biotech commercial model?  We would like to share five ways to improve the metrics and analytics that help you optimize your combined sales force, touchpoints and message recall, and meet the challenges of this new pharma/biotech commercial model. Depending on your current business challenges, at least one approach is very likely to help you as we move into this new biopharma commercial model.

    hbspt.cta.load(2405078, '0f906aac-4b90-4ec5-b47a-d8d775e8194b', {});

    Five of our analytical approaches to set the wheels in motion:

    1. Improve the measurement of your competitive standing with a multidimensional share of voice

    While you may be winning share of voice with reps alone, you may be falling behind in the overall race. Consider tracking your multidimensional touchpoint reach for a more holistic and accurate guidepost.

    2. Coordinate multiple touchpoints, with the sales rep at the center

    Biopharma’s use of multichannel to reach no-see physicians has matured. Now, forward-leaning marketing and sales leaders are leveraging “rep- triggering” technology to meet customer needs. Fully leverage reps’ clearer perspective of physicians’ imperatives, and empower reps to meet customer needs. Then measure the commercial impact of the new multi-touchpoint experience.

    3. Combine the optimal set of touchpoints to improve the overall customer experience

    The needs of healthcare professionals (HCPs) are increasingly complicated. Use multi-touchpoint analytics to find the combination of touchpoints that does the best job of meeting those crucially important customer needs.

    4. Focus on impactful messages for greater impact on prescribing behavior

    Reach doesn’t matter if the message isn’t relevant. And a high-impact message that isn’t remembered is a lost opportunity. Many brands still focus too much on the percent of physicians who recall messages. In celebrating the success of high recall for some messages, they forget to test each message’s impact, and then they miss the insight that recall may be the lowest on messages that have the greatest impact on prescribing behavior.

    5. Concentrate marketing investments on the most effective touchpoints for your critical messages

    Each touchpoint can have a higher or lower transmission effectiveness for your critical messages. Brand teams and sales forces need to remember to assess their portfolio of touchpoints with regard to their effectiveness in transmitting key messages. Message transmission lets brand teams focus their investments on those touchpoints that get critical messages across to the physicians who need to know.

    Begin driving commercial effectiveness for your brand

    By applying our techniques, you’ll discover how you can align messages and touchpoints to optimize their impact.

    For a deeper dive into these five techniques for driving your brand’s commercial effectiveness, download our white paper, “Five ways brand teams can align messages and touchpoints for greater commercial effectiveness”.

    hbspt.cta.load(2405078, '0f906aac-4b90-4ec5-b47a-d8d775e8194b', {});

    Then let’s start a conversation so we can help guide you in the process.

    Tom Hartley is Senior Vice President of GfK’s Health business. He can be reached at tom.hartley@gfk.com.

  • Medical Marketing and Media’s annual feature
    • 12/08/17
    • Health
    • Global
    • English

    Medical Marketing and Media’s annual feature

    Looking ahead to 2018, the most promising products in pharma's pipeline will compete in a landscape that increasingly rewards big risks and places an emphasis on novel mechanisms. Read more.

  • Five ways brand teams can align messages and touchpoints for greater commercial effectiveness
    • 12/06/17
    • Health
    • Global
    • English

    Five ways brand teams can align messages and touchpoints for greater commercial effectiveness

    Our white paper presents a clear path to help brand teams and sales forces improve commercial effectiveness and maximize message recall and SFE in this evolving multichannel world.

    • 11/22/17
    • Health
    • Travel and Hospitality
    • Global
    • English

    What does living ‘the good life’ really mean? Hear it from consumers

    When we think about “living the dream” or “living the good life”, we usually think about health, family, work, experiences and finances.  But what is really the most important in the eyes of consumers, and how do those factors stack up against each other?

    This was the focus of our most recently published global study, where we asked thousands of consumers around the world about which factors they personally see as being an essential part of ‘the good life’ or the life they’d like to have.  Would the results differ by age group or from country to country?  And have any new trends emerged this year?

    Here are the factors in order of international popularity, according to consumers.

     

    Top factors internationally

    As seen above, the top ranking factors internationally for being part of “the good life” are good health, financial security, and free time/leisure time, followed by a happy marriage, the ability to travel for leisure, owning a home, control over one’s own life and a job that is interesting.

    What’s also revealing is the factors that rank lower on the list, such as children, spiritual enrichment, having a nice yard and a lawn, and having a luxury car or second car.

    For brands and marketers, the results of this global study have implications on the future and what consumers value most.  Are your products and services aligned with the consumer’s vision of their ideal life?  What kind of messaging and advertising will resonate best with consumers and which products and services have the most increasing or decreasing mass appeal?

    In digging a little deeper, we see that there are variances for each age bracket, with younger age groups seeing a college education as more essential to the good life, and older age groups placing more emphasis on financial security.  Clearly, those with more life experience value the security blanket that health and wealth provides, whereas it could be argued that the younger demographic trends more toward prioritizing accumulating those life experiences.

    What are the differences regionally?

    To help identify specific market opportunities, we offer a country by country breakdown of the results from our global study.

     

    Financial security, which is the second highest ranking factor internationally, has the most resonance with consumers in Russia, followed by Germany and Belgium.  On the other hand, when it comes to travelling for leisure as part of the good life, Argentina takes the lead, followed by Brazil and Spain.

    What this means for brands

    So what does it really mean to live the good life, and how can businesses respond?  As consumers internationally increasingly value time and experiences over materials and possessions, balanced with more practical factors like good health and financial security, they will continue to look to brands to help them achieve the life they’d like to have.  The brands that are able to deliver on fulfilling this promise will live “the good life” of their own, with a healthy business, financial security, and control of their own life.

    About the study

    The survey question asked, “When you think of the Good Life – the life you’d like to have – which of the things on this list, if any, are part of that Good Life as far as you, personally, are concerned?: A home you own; Good health; A happy marriage; A job that is interesting; Children; A yard and lawn/a nice garden; Free time/leisure time; Spiritual enrichment; A college education; Financial security; A luxury car or second car; Travel for leisure; Really nice clothes / accessories / jewelry; Having the latest electronics and gadgets for my home; Control over one’s own life; None of the above; Don’t know”

    GfK interviewed 23,000 consumers online in 17 countries in the summer 2017. Data are weighted to reflect the demographic composition of the online population aged 15+ in each market. The global average given in this release is weighted, based on the size of each country proportional to the other countries. 4 Countries included are Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Netherlands, Russia, South Korea, Spain, UK and USA.

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  • Women’s perceptions and treatment patterns related to contraception: Results of a survey of US women
    • 11/21/17
    • Health
    • United States
    • English

    Women’s perceptions and treatment patterns related to contraception: Results of a survey of US women

    The aim of this survey was to understand US women’s contraception journey from her first prescribed method to her current one, including reasons for choosing and stopping/switching methods, healthcare provider relationships and bleeding preferences.

  • GfK's Mark Girardi to host Market Access webinar with Q1 Productions
    • 11/07/17
    • Health
    • Market Access
    • United States
    • English

    GfK's Mark Girardi to host Market Access webinar with Q1 Productions

    GfK's Mark Girardi will be hosting a webinar with Q1 Productions on November 28 about "Incorporating Market Access Into The New Product Development Process."

  • GfK at ISPOR: Exploring the evolving value story in healthcare
    • 10/24/17
    • Health
    • Global
    • English

    01/01/70
    GfK at ISPOR: Exploring the evolving value story in healthcare

    Meet our Market Access Experts at ISPOR’s 20th Annual European Congress November 4-8 in Glasgow

  • GfK at ISPOR: Exploring the evolving value story in healthcare
    • 10/24/17
    • Health
    • United States
    • English

    01/01/70
    GfK at ISPOR: Exploring the evolving value story in healthcare

    Meet our Market Access Experts at ISPOR’s 20th Annual European Congress November 4-8 in Glasgow

  • Value Frameworks in Oncology
    • 10/24/17
    • Health
    • Global
    • English

    Value Frameworks in Oncology

    Read our Value Frameworks in Oncology analysis, published in American Health & Drug Benefits.

    • 10/23/17
    • Health
    • Global
    • English

    Demystifying quantitative methods: Three easy steps to drive your pharmaceutical pricing strategy

    Pricing for pharmaceuticals continues to grow in complexity for the industry due to a variety of factors.  A few of the prominent challenges our clients face include:

       

    • Just one chance to get it right. Once a price strategy is in place, course corrections are difficult and sometimes even impossible; for example, price increases in ex-US markets. Not just leaving money on the table is a concern.  Also when exceeding a price threshold, a change in price strategy might not even correct payer and prescriber perception and change behavior to the expected extent.
    • More competitive markets. Many indications, even in oncology and specialty care, have become crowded market spaces between brand, generic and biosimilar players these days. Standing out in the crowd from a value perspective can be challenging; thus pricing becomes even more important.
    • Continuously growing price pressure. Healthcare budgets keep expanding and payers look for savings potential, in particular with drugs. A popular concept is shifting budgetary risk to manufacturers, either based on spend or measured by outcomes. In the US, also patient exposure to cost is a growing market access hurdle.
    • Prescriber price sensitivity. Beyond payer influences on utilization, prescribers are more aware than ever of drug prices and more likely to chime in for the discussion in the media. In the US, value frameworks have become an instrument to convey different perspectives of measuring value which payers start to look at when making drug coverage decisions.
    •  

    To provide robust input for a pricing strategy, three components are key:

       

    1. Overall approach of the pricing research to reflect the strategic objectives for your product
    2.  

    Earlier stage and a less complex marketplace suggest a streamlined, quick turnaround approach with an essential sample of payers and a concise N sample with physicians, for example 30 by market, with a focus on direct pricing methods.

    Launch strategy and/or highly complex/competitive markets require not just larger samples for payers and physicians (ideally 100/market), but also more sophisticated indirect methods; e.g., DCM and complex market models.

       

    1. Pricing methods adequate for the research objectives
    2.  

    Direct methods such as Van Westendorp and Gabor Granger address fundamental price reaction, while indirect methods provide higher precision.  For very early development assessments, pure price/value perception can be sufficient, while a more developed profile requires a multi-method approach. Indirect methods such as adaptive conjoint are also the method of choice for a larger number of product concepts to test.

       

    1. Integrated findings representing all P&R stakeholders
    2.  

    Critical is an adequate approach to combine product and price-related behavior for payers’ reaction to price, physicians reacting to restrictions, patient response to out-of-pocket costs to derive a resulting price/volume relationship and identify optimal pricing.

    We offer a unique profile to support quantitative pricing research

    Our team has developed a tried-and-tested pricing approach addressing the specific objectives for your product.  We leverage country-level price and market access expertise in the US and globally with an integrated team of experts in healthcare, quantitative methods and primary research.  Moreover, our project approach is direct and efficient in close contact with your project team.

    Through our quantitative pricing approach, we provide the most in-depth understanding of the pricing and reimbursement opportunity of your product.

    Meet with us at ISPOR!

    Our team of market access experts will be at ISPOR in Glasgow, November 4 to 8 in booth #207 and would welcome a discussion around our quantitative pricing approach and how it can generate optimal output for your pricing strategy! Click here to set up a meeting.

    Michael Kuehn is a Vice President of Market Access at GfK. Please email Michael.Kuehn@gfk.com or leave a comment below to share your thoughts.

    • 10/20/17
    • Health
    • Global
    • English

    Putting payers in the spotlight: Shifting the market access mindset to focus on shaping payer attitudes

    “You can’t manage what you don’t measure” – Peter Drucker

    This well-known mantra proffered by the management guru Peter Drucker in the early 1960s still holds true today! Many successful commercial organizations rely to a great extent on measuring key performance indicators (KPIs) in order to monitor their successes, identify shortcomings and develop strategic responses to changes in performance.

    For big pharma this remains common practice, leveraging healthcare provider, patient and caregiver data utilizing awareness, trial and utilization (ATU) tracking, and ongoing customer satisfaction studies. Surprisingly, industry has been slow to adopt such approaches when it comes to payers.

    The importance of embracing the payer role

    The commercial environment that confronts the pharma industry is becoming  increasingly challenging and uncertain, not least because of the heterogeneous mix of stakeholders that need to be aligned to the value proposition.  It is a well-acknowledged fact that payers are playing an increasingly pivotal role in terms of influencing “go/no-go”’ decisions at the expense of other stakeholders; i.e., HCPs/patients.  So as we seek to establish a positive environment that supports access and uptake of new health technologies, one thing seems very clear: we need to do so in a way that addresses all key stakeholder groups, including payers.

    The ability to monitor and assess payer metrics as part of the stakeholder mix presents pharma with a critical opportunity to shape rather than react to the market, therefore aligning payers with the product value proposition ahead of launch and beyond.

    Four key components to enable greater agility and responsiveness to payer needs

       

    1. Leverage a payer tracker program. This is a key tool for supporting timely adjustment of commercial planning across the lifecycle to enable pharma MA professionals to:

    2. Support payer tracking activities. This is possible with a robust and rigorous predictive framework, which is fundamental to the design of a payer tracker. It must feature carefully designed KPIs which need to be actionable, replicable and measurable and reflect payer-orientated key drivers, including:
    3.  

       

    • Level of awareness (disease, unmet needs, perceptions of treatments)
    • Willingness to pay
    • Understanding burden of illness (economic, societal, humanistic)
    • Product-specific KPIs
    • Communication/engagement with pharma (frequency, mode, relevance)
    • Launch activities (pre/post launch – clinical data, congresses)
    •  

    Having established the baseline, clients are in a position to challenge commercial organizations to “move the dial” and to monitor performance pre- and post-launch against a set of tangible, measurable goals.

       

    1. Understand the highly heterogeneous nature of the payer audience. Take into account national vs. regional/local payer mix and also geographies (US managed markets vs. EU price driven vs. more mixed reimbursement APAC) to ensure that it reflects regional/local variations.
    2. Utilize dynamic reporting. A robust payer tracker offering should deliver “at-a glance” results across metrics, markets, target groups and waves and empower knowledge-sharing between local affiliate, regional & HQ teams.
    3.  

    GfK offers an innovative and robust payer tracker program

    Our payer tracking is driven by our distinctive and rigorous methodology, supported by our global panel of over 5,000 payers and payer advisors across national and subnational levels. An online deliverable platform with dynamic dashboards displays, full in-view results across metrics, countries, target groups and waves can all be customized to your reporting needs.

    Through our payer tracker program, we provide a unique opportunity to obtain the most in-depth understanding of payers; knowledge that will empower you to anticipate change and shape the market.

    Meet with us at ISPOR!

    Our team of market access experts will be at ISPOR in Glasgow, November 4 to 8 in booth #207 and would welcome a discussion around your payer challenges and how our payer monitoring program can get you on track! Click here to set up a meeting.

    Santanu Das is a Vice President of Market Access at GfK. Please email santanu.das@gfk.com or leave a comment below to share your thoughts.

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