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  • Tracking holidaymakers as they plan their next trip
    • 12/01/15
    • Travel and Hospitality
    • Digital Market Intelligence
    • United States
    • English

    Tracking holidaymakers as they plan their next trip

    We showed that consumers are unreliable predictors of their own behavior, and that tracking of actual behavior was needed.

  • Research improves digital campaigns
    • 12/01/15
    • Technology
    • Digital Market Intelligence
    • Belgium
    • English

    Research improves digital campaigns

    We used our metering technology to track and capture every step of the purchase journey – from the moment consumers encountered Nokia’s product information online to when they made the purchase. We explored digital and offline touchpoint interactions through on-site surveys, which included weekly diaries.

  • Research improves digital campaigns
    • 12/01/15
    • Technology
    • Digital Market Intelligence
    • Singapore
    • English

    Research improves digital campaigns

    We used our metering technology to track and capture every step of the purchase journey – from the moment consumers encountered Nokia’s product information online to when they made the purchase. We explored digital and offline touchpoint interactions through on-site surveys, which included weekly diaries.

  • Research improves digital campaigns
    • 12/01/15
    • Technology
    • Digital Market Intelligence
    • United Kingdom
    • English

    Research improves digital campaigns

    We used our metering technology to track and capture every step of the purchase journey – from the moment consumers encountered Nokia’s product information online to when they made the purchase. We explored digital and offline touchpoint interactions through on-site surveys, which included weekly diaries.

    • 11/16/15
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Digital Market Intelligence
    • United States
    • English

    Wendt Joins GfK in Senior US Media Role

    Wendt will provide strategic leadership, insuring that GfK’s global media strategy is supported and implemented throughout North America and take part in global media initiatives on single-source research and mobile panels

    • 11/06/15
    • Technology
    • Digital Market Intelligence
    • Global
    • English

    Evaluating mobile ads: At last!

    If you’re running advertising campaigns that integrate digital as part of your media plan you’ll know that measuring mobile ad effectiveness is a significant challenge.

    Going beyond impression delivery reports and conversion KPIs to deliver a view on branding impact and cross media interaction is something I’ve spent years persuading people to do.

    It’s perceived as a difficult undertaking, one that means that the vast majority of the companies I talk to that use digital media as part of their ad mix simply don’t measure mobile ad effectiveness.

    If you don’t measure it, you don’t know if and how it’s working. And crucially, in today’s data-led environment, without the metrics you can’t justify ROI or requests for budget.

    Yet we all know spend on digital advertising is huge –globally by 2019 70% of all digital ad spend will be on mobile. So even now not advertising on digital – and mobile in particular – simply isn’t an option for most brands.

    If some of your budget is allocated to mobile or even if you have digital plans that have yet to go there, you may well be one of the organizations struggling to prove mobile advertising’s impact. The good news is we can now measure mobile ad effectiveness – both in app and in browser. Finally, we have closed the cross-media measurement loop.

    If you want to know what this means for your brands, what we can measure and how we do it, please join our webinar on 3rd of December where Nathalie Mandavit, Global Director Communication Efficiency, will join me to explain our mobile advertising effectiveness approach..

    I hope you can join us: Register Here.

    For more information, please contact Arno Hummerston at arno.hummerston@gfk.com.

    • 11/05/15
    • Technology
    • Digital Market Intelligence
    • Global
    • English

    Like taking candy from a baby – Why $5.9 billion is a sensible price for king

    Activision Blizzard’s announced acquisition of King Digital Entertainment, best known as the creators of Candy Crush, would have raised a few eyebrows on Tuesday. For some, $5.9 billion would seem pretty steep for a company best known for virtualizing ‘three-in-a-row’, and it is undoubtedly a high price when put into context of other recent major acquisitions – taking Facebook as an example, they paid just $1.1 billion for Instagram in 2012, and $2 billion to acquire Oculus VR last year. However, for many it will be seen as a particularly savvy move by a company already leading the way in the PC and console gaming sector with Call of Duty and World of Warcraft franchises.

    Firstly, sticking with the financials, the current valuation represents around a $1 billion discount from their IPO price of around $7 billion in March of last year.

    The Mobile Foothold

    It is the mobile foothold that King offers which suggests that Activision has made a sensible move. Data from our CrossMedia link panel in the UK, where we continuously track Android & iOS mobile devices, illustrates the strength of King in the mobile space. Focusing on Android smartphones; Candy Crush Saga was the 20th most used app in September 2015, played by just under one in ten smartphone owners, and is closely followed by the sequel, Candy Crush Soda Saga in 24th place. In fact King dominates mobile gaming owning the 3 most played Android gaming apps, and 5 of the top 10.

    Not only do they lead the way in audience reach, but their games also encourage an extremely high level of engagement. The average Candy Crush Soda Saga player went on the app over 27 times in September, just short of once a day, and played for over 3 hours. To put that into context that’s almost as much time as people spend on Facebook.

    This engagement also fosters a willingness to spend money. Unlike the console world, where the majority of money is made up front with the initial purchase (though downloadable content is growing), King’s titles are free to download and instead they make their revenue through a steady flow of in-app purchases throughout the lifespan of the game, which can be anything up to 4 years. Three King games were in the top 10 grossing games on both Apple’s App Store and Google Play Store in the US in Q2 2015[1].

    While Activision Blizzard have made a foray into the mobile world, particularly with spinoffs of their best-selling PC/console titles, they lie some way further down the rankings and have not fostered the same levels of engagement. This lies in stark contrast with their performance in PC and console gaming where, according to GfK Chart-Track data, since 2008 and the establishment of Activision after the Vivendi merger, the company has accounted for 13.5% of all console and PC games revenue in the UK. Over that same period, their Call of Duty franchise has accumulated the most revenue of any games brand (£908m).

    The acquisition provides Activision Blizzard access to both the largest network of mobile gamers through their current free-to-play titles, and the skills and expertise to develop and grow the reach of their hit console titles on mobile, and make them available any place, any time.

    Expanding their market

    The importance of mobile gaming is already well documented with revenue suggested to hit over $30 billion this year, and surpass that of console games[2]. This growth is not expected to slow, with predictions of a further $10 billion to be added in the next 2 years. Nearly half of our panelists engaged with a game in September, making it the 9th most engaged with category on smartphones, and reports suggest that the number of individuals gaming increasing, and the time spent playing mobile games is entering into multiple hours per day.

    Lastly, don’t ignore the immense data asset that King represents. With 340 million average monthly unique users, and many of these signing in via Facebook, they undoubtedly hold a huge amount of data around their users. So far this has largely been used to market across the King app franchise, but could now be utilized to up sell to major console titles.

    For more information contact Michael Grogan at michael.grogan@gfk.com.

    [1] investor.king.com/investors/news/financial-releases/Press-Release-Details/2015/King-Reports-Second-Quarter-2015-Results/default.aspx

    [2] venturebeat.com/2014/10/22/mobile-games-will-overtake-console-revenues-in-2015/

    • 11/02/15
    • Technology
    • Digital Market Intelligence
    • Global
    • English

    Your brand’s edge on social media: Customer-centric social listening

    Brands have found that a lot can be learned from monitoring what is being said online about their products, services, employees, campaigns and competitors. Those a bit more advanced in social listening have found that broadening searches to cover the product category or industry can create a more holistic picture. But, is there even more to take advantage of?

    More generally, brands are shifting from “push approaches” to more customer-centric models, and I believe social listening methods should follow suit. An awareness of brand mentions online can no doubt highlight how businesses can improve what they’re currently doing. But, is an understanding of past customer experiences enough to identify ways to surprise and delight in the future? Maybe consumers are already telling you how, if you listen hard enough.

    What are consumers saying more generally on social media that paints a better picture of who they are – their interests and passion points, or their routines and habits? For example, could seemingly uninteresting tweets about your followers’ daily commute uncover new thoughts about when and where to advertise? Might Instagram posts of gym selfies and green juices #onthetable suggest that your community is unexpectedly health conscious and therefore your product line needs to develop to speak to this crowd? Could constant references to #tbt (or, #throwbackthursday) suggest that nostalgia-based campaigns are the way to your consumers’ heart?

    It’s this broader picture that will uncover new ways for your brand to embed itself in consumers’ lives. New and unexpected brand experiences should result in greater positivity and also memorability among consumers, and we know from our work with brands that these two experience dimensions work together to solidify future brand relationships.

    So, when setting up your social listening approach, it shouldn’t just be about what to listen out for but also who to listen to. Insights on consumers’ everyday lives should be gathered from on-going monitoring of a mix of different groups. Some obvious choices include current followers of the brand’s social channels and those who discuss the brand/product/category online.

    Among the latter subset, consider applying our Customer Brand Relationship (CBR) Framework to identify ‘strong’, ‘at risk’ and ‘weak’ customer segments to listen to further. Manual analysis of social mentions allows us to decode these relationship signals consumers send about a brand online; understanding CBR signals in the context of consumers’ everyday lives may point to ways that ‘strong’ relationships can be maintained and ‘at risk’ relationships can be bolstered.

    We could also identify product and category influencers to monitor on an on-going basis. Insight that allows for a more positive relationship with influencers is important, as brand perceptions of opinion leaders will likely have a knock-on effect among the wider audience.

    To get more out of social listening, put consumers at the heart of your search. Use insights from social monitoring to improve on what has happened in the past across all business areas, react in real-time with an awareness of conversations occurring in the present, but also to discover how to create new and more meaningful experiences for your consumers in the future.

    For more information contact Maryann Huynh at maryann.huynh@gfk.com.

    • 11/01/15
    • Health
    • Digital Market Intelligence
    • Global
    • English

    Improve your marketing by observing the digital patient experience

    With technology and digital information sources advancing rapidly, to be effective marketers, it is important to understand the complete market dynamic a consumer faces when searching for disease or treatment information.  While extensive data about their quest traditionally have been obtained using surveys, the data are recall-based and therefore are subject to the reliability and validity issues inherent in self-reported methods.

    Digital tracking technology has advanced beyond cookies to apps that can capture every search term and URL-click a person makes on their devices (PC, laptop, tablet or mobile). This tracking, used for research purposes and with the permission of respondents, enables us to change our measurement strategy. Thereby, we can capture attitudes as well as passively observe behavior as it occurs. Importantly, researchers can link survey data with behavioral data, allowing for a deeper and more robust understanding of the intentions behind individuals’ behavior.

    So how can we best exemplify the significance of understanding the patient’s digital experience and then leveraging that knowledge? In this article we will share the methodological details of a GfK study that examines how, in this case, diabetes-focused marketers can be more patient-centric in their digital strategy in the following areas:

       

    • media planning
    • content strategy
    • optimization of digital assets
    •  

    The study objective was to use an observational approach to better understand the journey of people with diabetes through evaluating their buying, navigation and search behavior. People with diabetes were recruited from our US panel and downloaded our proprietary tracking app onto their PC or laptop. The app then monitored the respondents’ web use for three weeks, collecting data on all URLs they went to, the duration of their visits, search behavior and other information. Respondents completed a diary survey two times /week for the first two weeks, where they described their online and offline experiences. Certain high-profile websites were pre-programmed with short entry and exit surveys. We assigned a task for week three – half of the respondents were to research blood glucose meters and half were to research weight management.

    Data from multiple sources were integrated into this study, including:

       

    • tracking – over 426,000 URLs and searches
    • diabetes survey – a 45-minute “day in the life” survey of 2,200 diagnosed patients
    • customer profiles from our panel
    • survey data from the three-week study
    •  

    Combining the behavioral tracking data with the other data streams enriched our understanding of their digital journey, including:

       

    • where they go to obtain health information
    • what importance they place on online and offline sources
    • how they ultimately made the decision to buy a glucose meter.
    •  

    The key learnings from the study that comprise the core components to optimizing digital strategy using a data-driven approach included:

       

    • Media planning: Diet sites generate deeper activity than any other site category, with half of visits leading to an additional drill-down within the site.
    • Content strategy: Diet and recipe sources – sites that fulfill patients’ day-to-day, non-medication oriented needs – track the highest repeat visits across site categories.
    • Optimization of digital assets:
    •  

    o    Most search topics are centered on managing weight and blood sugar levels; insurance topics are also popular.

    o    General health sites generate higher audience reach, more repeat visits and longer visit duration than diabetes-specific sites.

    An accurate view that minimizes patients’ recalled experiences is crucial to unlocking the digital experience that so many marketers seek. This view requires an approach that does not solely rely on self-reported methods, which is why the use of an observational approach to evaluate behavior is crucial to answer these questions. This helps us to evaluate the total patient experience.

    Of course, validity and reliability are the keystones of observational methodology. In a situation where a patient self-reports, the resulting data is subject to many variables. By using the observational method, the patient’s behavior is an undisputed matter of record.

    This article was co-authored by Art Rome of Health.

    For further information, contact Natasha Stevens.

  • How Facebook advertising works with traditional media
    • 10/30/15
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Digital Market Intelligence
    • Belgium
    • English

    How Facebook advertising works with traditional media

    We used our cookie and tag sampling solution – GfK Exposure Effects – to track which consumers were exposed to which advertisements, and how frequently.

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  • How Facebook advertising works with traditional media
    • 10/30/15
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Digital Market Intelligence
    • Singapore
    • English

    How Facebook advertising works with traditional media

    We used our cookie and tag sampling solution – GfK Exposure Effects – to track which consumers were exposed to which advertisements, and how frequently.

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  • How Facebook advertising works with traditional media
    • 10/30/15
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Digital Market Intelligence
    • United Kingdom
    • English

    How Facebook advertising works with traditional media

    We used our cookie and tag sampling solution – GfK Exposure Effects – to track which consumers were exposed to which advertisements, and how frequently.

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