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    • 11/10/15
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Automotive
    • Home and Living
    • Brand and Customer Experience
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Online Pricing Intelligence
    • Point of Sales Tracking
    • User Experience (UX)
    • United Kingdom
    • English

    Highlights from #FCSummit15

    GfK's Future Consumer Summit 2015 in Canary Wharf brought together GfK experts alongside future thinkers from leading brands. They discussed their vision and evidence-based predictions of future consumer behavior. Speakers included Unilever, BBC, IKEA and Neue. 

    • 10/27/15
    • Retail
    • Consumer Goods
    • Brand and Customer Experience
    • Global
    • English

    Brand success in the new world

    Sustainability is a major goal for any brand. In order to become sustainable, a brand must make an emotional connection to its customers. In order to make an emotional connection, a brand must constantly engage and evolve its relationship with its customers. In her speech at the GfK Future Consumer Summit, Helen Zeitoun, Global Head of Brand and Customer Experience at GfK, detailed the steps a brand must take to ensure that it forms a lifetime bond with consumers. Emphasizing entertaining experiences, building positive sentiment, and the “wow” factor, Helen outlined how researchers and brands alike must rethink their approach to understanding what consumers want and how future behavior can best be predicted.

    The foundation for brand success rests on the simple truth that people like to have experiences. Brands must draw in and entertain consumers. Brands must also enable consumers to demonstrate how they benefit from and use that brand’s products and services. Finally, brands must understand behaviors and trends and predict what consumers will want before they know what they want. Beer giant Budweiser provides the perfect case story for how a brand can take advantage of changing trends and use these changes as an opportunity to interact with them. As micro-breweries became increasingly popular, Budweiser noticed an erosion of its market share. Faced with this challenge, Budweiser decided to join-in with this movement in the beer community. Through its “Untapped” app, Budweiser created a social setting and enabled consumers to share their experiences. In addition, Budweiser reached out through events and visits, successfully connecting with former, current, and future customers. Crucially, Budweiser understood that their future success was dependent on understanding and supporting changing tastes.

    This example highlights the importance of social media to consumers. While they may share a positive experience, they will also share a negative one. The underlying connection with a brand is important because how someone remembers an interaction is largely determined by emotion rather than fact. Rationality is far less significant in these instances than sentimentality is. For example, a customer calling a bank for help when their debit card is taken by an ATM, is far more likely to remember how they felt the bank handled the situation than what was said. The fact that the issue was ultimately resolved by the bank is less important, especially if the customer experienced a lot of hassle. Brand connections not only support acquisition and retention, but they also keep the door open in the event a customer churns.

    In order for brands to capture customer sentiment, they must go beyond brand communication and establish a model that supports new experiences and relationships. In Germany, the recent competition between Nike and Puma is a good example of the benefit that knowledge of consumer behavior provides. Between 2009 and 2013, Nike saw its market share rise, while Puma saw its fall. Looking at both brands during this period, both had similar brand performance and image scores. What separated the two brands was the imprint that Nike left on consumers’ memories and its presence on social media. Nike understood the full picture of consumer behavior by realizing the potential of social media for their brand. This model will hold them in good stead in the future because they have made an emotional link with their customers.

    Future brand success and sustainability are tied to the connections made today. Supported by technology and social media, brands must not only deliver memorable, exciting experiences, but they must also anticipate the direction their customers are headed, how they will get there, what will get them there, and why they will go this way. In order to do this, brands must rethink how they will achieve sustainability and researchers must rethink how they will capture and interpret future trends.

    For more information please contact Courtney Bergh at courtney.bergh@gfk.com.

  • The Future Consumer Summit 2015
    • 10/08/15
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Home Appliances
    • Financial Services
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Travel and Hospitality
    • Consumer Goods
    • FMCG
    • Media Measurement
    • Brand and Customer Experience
    • Digital Market Intelligence
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Point of Sales Tracking
    • Shopper
    • User Experience (UX)
    • United Kingdom
    • English

    10/08/15
    The Future Consumer Summit 2015

    Thank you to all who attended our 2015 Future Consumer Summit on 8th October at East Wintergarden, Canary Wharf. I hope you agree the event was a fantastic opportunity to hear our experts alongside future thinkers from leading brands deliver their vision and evidence based predictions of future consumer behaviour. We know technology will continue to have a massive impact on consumer behaviour. Understanding how this will look in the future is critical to the success of your business and we really want to support you on that journey.

    • 10/02/15
    • Brand and Customer Experience
    • Digital Market Intelligence
    • United Kingdom
    • English

    GfK digital ad effectiveness solutions to include mobile capability

    GfK can now identify when an individual is exposed to an advertisement on multiple devices (PC, smartphone, tablet etc.), enabling more accurate evaluation and attribution of the performance of ad formats, creative and overall campaigns.

    • 10/01/15
    • Technology
    • Brand and Customer Experience
    • Digital Market Intelligence
    • GfK Experience Effects
    • Global
    • English

    Mobile Ad Effectiveness set to change the world (at least a little bit)

    The ability to evaluate mobile ad effectiveness has long (in relative, digital terms) been an issue for those spending the money on it. The view has been that it is too difficult and too costly to do properly. Not anymore. There is a new show in town.

    Up to now marketers who have leveraged the mobile channel have done so relying on delivery and execution metrics such as CTR, CPC and conversions (however they are defined) to evaluate the impact of their dollar spend. But the challenge for them now is that the increased emersion of brands in a digital world means the understanding of the impact on awareness, image, reputation, emotional connection and resonance is needed more than ever. Behavioral KPIs are not enough now – robust branding metrics are essential.

    This has been a challenge in past. As I am sure you are told pretty regularly, we own more and more connected devices. In a recent Financial Times article they proclaimed mobile as the future. Safe to say it isn’t. It is the now and a reality many have not caught up to yet. This means there are more places to serve ads and more gadgets for advertisers to track delivery on. For proper evaluation we also need to take the delivery and impact of ads across all these devices – and to do this we need to measure whether exposure actually occurred or not. Unfortunately the usual way of doing this online, using cookies, does not recognize an individual across these devices. So one person, with 3 devices, can be represented as 3 people. That one person is then also only attributed one set of ad exposure on one device, instead of the total for all 3. The more devices you add, the more the issue is amplified.

    In order for us to be able to attribute exposures correctly therefore we need to be able to reconcile different cookies across the devices an individual uses. Adding to the multi-device headache is the fact that mobile devices and tablets have given the world a (now not very)new phenomenon: the app. Ads on a single mobile or tablet are delivered in both browsers and in apps, which are completely different environments (almost like different devices). The core of the issue is that apps don’t allow cookies so they cannot be used to identify a single user across the two environments. 1 handset can look like 2 people. It can deliver the same ad in two places (a mobile web page and an app, on the same device) and even the ad server will not know. For a research agency to be able to know is a step still further.

    At GfK we now have a solution that addresses these challenges utilizing a panel based approach that allows the unification of web and in-app exposure and the appreciation of multi-device usage. On top of that GfK has also partnered with Facebook to be able to include their unique ad environment into the mix.

    Solving the challenges mentioned above and the implementation of mobile into the evaluation mix completes the cross media picture for marketers. OK, so it was difficult to do but why is it so important to marketers?

    Firstly, now we can evaluate advertising delivered on mobile devices, cross device and cross environment (web and app). So we can now provide KPIs and advice to optimize the $100bn predicted to be spent on mobile ads in 2016. However, it gets better than that.

    The addition of mobile and the completed picture now also means we can provide much better evaluation and advice. Not just for mobile. Not just for digital. But for all media included in the evaluation. As the Infographic shows at the end of this post we end up with better quality data that improve the insights we can deliver – which is a truly GfK thing to shout about.

    Let’s be clear, there are still elements of the digital ad ecosystem that are a challenge, but what we do have now is going to make a huge difference to the understanding, optimization and ROI attribution of digital (and arguably, cross media) campaigns. Branding impact can now be used confidently alongside the conversion metrics. So even if your ads don’t deliver clicks, likes, sign-ups and sales, you can understand the all-important branding effects. As it has been proved that even search results have a branding impact, you are truly missing out if you don’t appreciate the power of the paid ad.

    I am really excited about this new innovation! Finally, we have the solution to the challenge and I can change my conference presentations from saying “I’m sure we will get there” to “We got there and we survived the experience”. So far.

    For more information please contact Arno Hummerston at arno.hummerston@gfk.com.

     

    Methodology

    Generally it is accepted that comparing people who have been exposed to the advertising (the test group) with those that haven’t (the control group) is the best way to understand the uplift in impact on brand KPIs that can be attributed to campaign activities. When you passively (technically) measure exposure you create a definitive test group of exposed respondents. We can now do this for mobile ads – both in-browser and in-app. As the infographic above shows, even if they claim, in a survey, to not recall the mobile ad or anything to do with it, we know they have been exposed because we use cookies or have identified their in-app exposure. We can now create a cleaner control group, as we only include people who have been identified as non-exposed to mobile ads through measurement rather than recall.

    The result of a cleaner control group is that we no longer have people who have actually been exposed but have been misassigned as non-exposed. They are no longer contributing to the over-claim on key metrics in the control group.

    By rectifying this we see a greater, or at least better quality, lift – or impact of the campaign. When a non-exposed-to-mobile-ad respondent is now correctly allocated to a control group, rather than to the test group because they claim to have seen the ad, the true impact on the brand is also made cleaner.

    This is certainly true of the mobile ad exposed respondents but is also probably true for all media. The control groups for TV, print and other desktop digital that was previously passively measured are also cleaner, as they do not contain people with mobile ad exposure anymore.

    This improvement in accuracy is key for control Vs test methodologies – which show the true branding performance of the individual media touchpoints.

  • GfK digital ad effectiveness solutions to include mobile capability
    • 09/29/15
    • Brand and Customer Experience
    • Digital Market Intelligence
    • Global
    • English

    GfK digital ad effectiveness solutions to include mobile capability

    GfK can now identify when an individual is exposed to an advertisement on multiple devices (PC, smartphone, tablet etc.), enabling more accurate evaluation and attribution of the performance of ad formats, creative and overall campaigns.

    • 09/24/15
    • Financial Services
    • Health
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Automotive
    • Consumer Goods
    • Brand and Customer Experience
    • Consumer Panels
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Shopper
    • User Experience (UX)
    • United States
    • English

    GfK Announces Management Board Changes

    GfK SE announced that Debbie Pruent will retire and be replaced by David Krajicek as Chief Commercial Officer for the Consumer Experiences Sector.

  • Gaining foresight into the needs of diabetes patients
    • 09/23/15
    • Health
    • Brand and Customer Experience
    • Global
    • English

    Gaining foresight into the needs of diabetes patients

    Combining digital observation with traditional surveys, we reveal the purchase journey for people with this common medical condition.

  • Gaining foresight into the needs of diabetes patients
    • 09/23/15
    • Health
    • Brand and Customer Experience
    • United Kingdom
    • English

    Gaining foresight into the needs of diabetes patients

    Our diabetes market experience research blended digital observation with traditional surveys to better understand diabetes patients’ buying, navigation and search behavior.

  • Gaining foresight into the needs of diabetes patients
    • 09/23/15
    • Health
    • Brand and Customer Experience
    • Belgium
    • English

    Gaining foresight into the needs of diabetes patients

    Our diabetes market experience research blended digital observation with traditional surveys to better understand diabetes patients’ buying, navigation and search behavior.

  • Gaining foresight into the needs of diabetes patients
    • 09/23/15
    • Health
    • Brand and Customer Experience
    • Singapore
    • English

    Gaining foresight into the needs of diabetes patients

    Our diabetes market experience research blended digital observation with traditional surveys to better understand diabetes patients’ buying, navigation and search behavior.

  • Gaining foresight into the needs of diabetes patients
    • 09/23/15
    • Health
    • Brand and Customer Experience
    • United States
    • English

    Gaining foresight into the needs of diabetes patients

    Our diabetes market experience research blended digital observation with traditional surveys to better understand diabetes patients’ buying, navigation and search behavior.

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