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  • Meet GfK at the 2017 asi International Radio & Audio and Television & Video Conferences
    • 10/27/17
    • Global
    • English

    11/08/17 - 11/10/17
    Meet GfK at the 2017 asi International Radio & Audio and Television & Video Conferences

    asi is the most prestigious audience measurement conference in Europe and we will be attending and contributing to the conversion with 3 sessions.

    • 10/27/17
    • Consumer Goods
    • Global
    • English

    Top factors for consumers in deciding what to eat or drink

    Low-sugar and GMO-free are top factors when deciding what to eat or drink, according to the results of our international online survey of 23,000 consumers.  Asked how important certain factors are when deciding what to eat or drink, nearly half of the study’s participants (48%) responded that “low sugar or sugar-free“ and “free from GMO ingredients“ are very or extremely important factors.

    These factors ranked as the highest in importance from a given list, followed by “low-sodium, low-salt“ products (45%). Also listed as very or extremely important were products that are organic, products that are low fat or no-fat, and products that are fortified with vitamins or minerals (44%).  Rounding out the list were products that are made locally or use local ingredients (38%), products that contain pre- or probiotics (35%) and products that are gluten-free (26%).

    Differentiators among survey respondents

    Age played a significant role in the results, with food and drink shoppers aged 30-39 years old being the most selective amongst all age groups, and those under 40 years old placing more importance on organic, probiotic, fortified and gluten-free products.

    When looking at income, people from high income households set consistently higher importance on all the factors, especially products that are GMO-free (55%), low sugar or sugar-free (54%) and low sodium or low salt (52%).  Low income households ranked the factors in a similar order of very or extremely important, but at a significantly lower percentage.

    Out of 17 countries surveyed, China was the most selective on what to eat and drink, with the highest number of respondents for top levels of importance on eight out of nine decision factors.  The below chart shows the top five countries per factor, with China giving way to Italy only in importance of food and beverage products that are “made locally or uses local ingredients”.

    With access to this kind of wide-ranging survey data, food and beverage brands are able to truly listen to the consumer and understand their individual market needs.  By combining these self-reported insights with data from areas such as point of sales tracking, consumer panels and geo-marketing, we can begin to see the full picture around what consumers do, say, and think on their trip to the grocery store or the vending machine.

    About the study

    The survey question asked, “When deciding which food or beverage product to eat or drink, how important are the following in making your decision?”, with options listed as It is organic or made from organic ingredients; It is made locally or uses local ingredients; It is a low-sugar or sugar-free product; It is low fat or no fat; It is a low-sodium, low-salt product; It is fortified with vitamins or minerals; It contains pre- or probiotics; It is free from GMO (genetically-modified) ingredients; It is gluten-free. GfK interviewed 23,000 consumers online in 17 countries in the summer 2017. Data are weighted to reflect the demographic composition of the online population aged 15+ in each market. The global average given in this release is weighted, based on the size of each country proportional to the other countries. Countries included are Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Netherlands, Russia, South Korea, Spain, UK and USA.

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  • Connected Consumer personality test
    • 10/27/17
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Connected Consumer personality test

    “Fast and Furious” or a “Virtual Virtuoso”? Which kind of Connected Consumer are you? Start our Connected Consumer personality test.

    • 10/26/17
    • Consumer Goods
    • Global
    • English

    Online vs. offline: Where should grocery brands invest?

    We get more and more signals that grocery brands are shifting marketing spends to digital solutions; digital campaigns to build your brand and trade investments in digital POS material and digital coupons for sales activation. Budgets are getting squeezed between online and offline initiatives since stores want brand owners to help them create even greater store experiences at the same time as online opens up new and exciting opportunities for marketers.

    The “digital-first movement” is evolving rapidly. Leading edge consumers frequently search for food inspiration online and use mobile apps when shopping, which gives us a hint on how we all will act in the future. Grocery chains in the forefront try out different hybrid shopping solutions where lines are becoming blurred between online and offline shopping. We have evidence that the campaigns and brand building you invest in online will also affect in-store sales in the long run since online shoppers are in fact also the most valuable ones offline. With this in mind we understand brand owners would like to invest accordingly.

    Budgets are getting squeezed and online investments still insecure and unstable

    At the same time you ask yourself how efficient your online investments are and some even chose to continue the “safe” traditional offline investment while waiting for more insights. Digital banners and ads on websites are quite expensive and ROI is insecure and unstable. You can also pay online grocery chains to make your product appear on the first page for your category to increase sales, but will you be able to do so for a longer period of time?

    One way of driving long term conversion on online grocery stores without investing in expensive inserts or promotions can be to improve your product’s keywords to better match your shoppers’ search terms. To know what keywords to use for your products, you need to know what shoppers search for in your category. Knowing that will help you to make the right decisions and ensure your products to be ranked among the top items, creating sales opportunities and driving higher conversion rates.

    Determining the search terms for your category on grocery sites key to improve conversion

    40 percent of those using search terms at grocery sites uses brand names but what do the others write in the free search field? How do you determine what search terms consumers are using to find products in your category?

    Replicas of e-commerce sites in market research allow grocery brand owners to do pre-tests of all their investments online and are a great way to find your products’ high-value search terms. This is a rather simple way of improving your conversion online before spending money.

    Contact us for more information on how to find the search terms for your category online.

  • Consumer climate falls slightly in Germany
    • 10/26/17
    • Press
    • Financial Services
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global
    • English

    Consumer climate falls slightly in Germany

    GfK forecasts a slight decrease in consumer climate for November of 0.1 points in comparison to the previous month to 10.7 points.

    • 10/25/17
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global
    • English

    Helping British consumers search for solace: Key trends for the year ahead

    As we look towards 2018, the one thing we can be certain about the year ahead is that there is going to be a lot of uncertainty. Britain’s departure from the European Union, what it will look like and the impact it could have on the country’s economy will hang over many consumers. What is certain, however, is that consumers’ attitudes, behaviors and values will continue to be affected by everything that’s going on around them, and these changes form the key consumer trends that brands and companies need to address in the next twelve months. Anticipating consumer needs is best way to connect with them, and to that end we’ve identified nine cross-category consumer trends for the year ahead.

    Releasing the stress

    One of the most striking findings from our 2017 research is the growing impact of stress on UK consumers. In 2015, 67% of Brits cited at least one of a list of 14 items as being a major cause of stress in their lives. This year, the same figure was 90%. The causes of stress are many and varied, with money being the most frequently cited, followed by the pressure people put on themselves.

    Two of our nine trends relate directly to helping people relieve the stress or pressure they feel in their daily lives. Streamlined Convenience highlights the fact that consumers are increasingly willing to pay for products and services that make their lives easier (a growth of nine percentage points since 2011), while Instant Everywhere talks to the expectation that goods and service should be immediately and constantly available when needed. Indeed, a growing proportion of the population are willing to settle for an inferior product if it’s available when they need it, which could pose a threat to established brands. Another coping mechanism is finding new and effective ways to maintain physical and mental wellbeing and combat stress; a topic that is covered in our trend called Fitspiration.

    Going even greener

    One area that could be a source of stress (or on the positive side a means of self-actualization) is the environmental and ethical credentials of the purchases we make. In particular, consumers increasingly feel guilty when they do something that is not environmentally friendly, which is covered by our Green Guilt trend. At the same time, many increasingly think about the provenance of what they’re buying, which we term Considered Consumption.

    Making the everyday easier

    The year ahead will also see numerous technological advances, which could help consumers to get more out of life, or prove to be an extra layer of complication. How the benefits of these new products and services are positioned will be essential to their success. One area we expect to see commercialized more is smart home technology, which could help consumers as they go about Redefining Home.  Technology also enables a greater degree of Individualization than ever before, as people seek products that can be tailored to meet their needs.

    Getting the most out of… everything

    At the same time, disruption will continue in a wide range of categories, fueled not only by technology but also consumers’ never-ending quest for the best deal possible as they go on Revaluing Value. When the going gets tough, consumers’ priority is to maintain the standard of living they’ve enjoyed previously by whatever means, and they’ll look to brands and companies to help them do this as they enjoy themselves wherever possible and get on with Experiencing Life.

    How can you use it in your favor?

    As we can see, consumers are becoming more demanding in the new year coming, they don’t want just products anymore, they want solutions to problems, experiences on-demand that make them feel in sync with the environment while getting the best value out of their money. The challenge for businesses is anticipating how these trends are going to impact their industry and therefore, use it as an advantage to win their trust and loyalty.

    If you want to discuss further about how these trends can affect your specific industry, please feel free to contact me: David.Crosbie@gfk.com

    Discover more about the current UK consumer in a post-Brexit environment with our Searching for Solace report.

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  • GfK releases updated maps for all of Europe
    • 10/25/17
    • Press
    • Geomarketing
    • Geodata
    • Digital Maps
    • Digital Maps
    • Global
    • English

    GfK releases updated maps for all of Europe

    GfK has released its Europe Map Edition 2017/2018, which includes thousands of updates to the previous year's edition. The digital maps reveal Europe's current administrative and postcode boundaries. As such, they provide the basis for carrying out accurate geographic analyses in geomarketing software and BI systems.

  • Low-sugar and GMO-free are top factors when deciding what to eat or drink
    • 10/25/17
    • Retail
    • FMCG
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global Study
    • Global
    • English

    Low-sugar and GMO-free are top factors when deciding what to eat or drink

    Nearly half of consumers across 17 countries rate low sugar and GMO-free as "very" or "extremely" important when deciding what to eat or drink - just ahead of factors such as low-salt, organic, low fat, or fortified with vitamins or minerals.

    • 10/24/17
    • Retail
    • Consumer Goods
    • Shopper
    • Global
    • English

    Category regeneration: Most retailers and manufacturers aren’t asking the right questions. Are you?

    Traditionally, product categories don’t get any attention unless it’s absolutely necessary. It’s only when KPIs start flashing red that it’s time to hit the refresh cycle. But a new environment of hyper-competition combined with an increasingly unpredictable consumer has changed all that. Welcome to the world of continuous category improvement.

    The overall philosophy of category regeneration is to continually assess the category and make improvements which generate a sales return. But rarely does anyone ask the real question “Why do people buy these products?” And if we ignore it, we get trapped in a conflagration of competing retailer and manufacturer interests. The result? A shelf that does not service the interest of its owner, the shopper.

    Selling solutions, not categories

    Examples of effective shopper marketing in UK grocery stores are few and far between. Many would argue that retailers simply can’t be bothered. We believe that more innovation is urgently needed, specifically initiatives which attempt to forge a better connection with consumers and their needs in store. Marks and Spencer is one such example of a retailer who has bothered to ask that all important question, “Why do people buy these products?”

    They were not satisfied that the reason consumers visit their ready meals aisle is purely because they want something quick to eat. Instead, they recognized that the desire for something indulgent was often the motivation behind a visit to this shelf. In response, they have dual-sited beer as they have recognized that it completes this experience for many consumers. In doing so, they are selling solutions, not categories. This is modern category management, and the sort of philosophy more companies should subscribe to.

    Of course, practically speaking, it’s not physically possible for all products to be situated next to the many other items that are consumed on the same occasion. Nevertheless, this mentality of considering the need states or occasions which motivate the shopper and then organizing the product shelf accordingly should be much more widespread. Retailers need to think like shoppers – and go out of their way to try and help them. This is where virtual stores prove to be invaluable.

    Think like a shopper

    Virtual store environments can help you see how shoppers think. A shopper decision tree can reveal the structure of the category in the shopper’s eyes quickly and cost effectively. We often find that the way shoppers understand the category is radically different to how it is organized. By understanding the triggers and barriers at a category and SKU level, virtual stores can also help identify the cues needed to entice the shopper into the aisle and help them understand the choices available to them when they arrive.

    As category management moves to a process of continual improvement, companies must keep their eye on who it is they are serving. Shoppers are the ones who count. They are the focus of category management. Retailers and manufacturers must make it their business to identify and connect with them and meet their needs every step of the way. With its combination of behavioral data and survey results, virtual testing is both a cost effective and time efficient way to maximize the effectiveness of category marketing.

    James LLewellyn is the UK Head of Shopper. Please email James.Llewellyn@gfk.com or leave a comment below to share your thoughts.

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  • GfK at ISPOR: Exploring the evolving value story in healthcare
    • 10/24/17
    • Health
    • Global
    • English

    01/01/70
    GfK at ISPOR: Exploring the evolving value story in healthcare

    Meet our Market Access Experts at ISPOR’s 20th Annual European Congress November 4-8 in Glasgow

  • Value Frameworks in Oncology
    • 10/24/17
    • Health
    • Global
    • English

    Value Frameworks in Oncology

    Read our Value Frameworks in Oncology analysis, published in American Health & Drug Benefits.

  • Smartphone average selling price sees record year-on-year growth in 3Q
    • 10/24/17
    • Technology
    • Point of Sales Tracking
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Tech Trends
    • Global
    • English

    Smartphone average selling price sees record year-on-year growth in 3Q

    Smartphone average selling price (ASP) globally accelerated further in 3Q17, posting the highest year-on-year increase in any observed quarter. Strong 3Q demand for smartphones is powered by Latin America, Central and Eastern Europe

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