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  • Brick-and-mortar retail in the EU: Highest 2019 growth in Romania and Lithuania
    • 05/09/19
    • Press
    • Global
    • English

    Brick-and-mortar retail in the EU: Highest 2019 growth in Romania and Lithuania

    GfK study on European retail

  • Retail trends and technologies – pt. 2
    • 05/08/19
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • TEMAX
    • Global
    • English

    Retail trends and technologies – pt. 2

    In our previous blog on retail trends & technologies, we discussed how retailers can adapt to intelligent retailing and increase their security in retail stores. In this post, we’ll cover how important it is to provide a connected customer experience and steps retailers can take into automation.

    The consumers of today want to not only make a purchase, but also have a great experience doing so. A rich experience is extremely relevant for shopping behavior—a key factor for retailers. Good experiences can provide additional value and trigger new or additional purchases.

    Retail Trend #3: Creating a seamless shopper experience

    Whether a customer is shopping in a brick and mortar store, at home or on the go, the most adequate experience should be available at all times. In retail trends, round the clock availability and situational independence are slowly becoming the norm. Our GfK FutureBuy study reveals that consumers regard “social media as an important source of information” and “mobile [as] an important tool for making a purchase” which further demonstrates the increasing importance of these experience drivers. Let’s look at different scenarios to describe what it means to provide a connected experience.

    Scenario 1: Connecting online with offline

    Let’s assume different shopper journeys for John. In his first purchase journey, he starts from home using a mobile/tablet to shop online. While browsing, he can use various technologies to help him find what he’s looking for such as:

    1. Voice assistant to bring up a specific item or store
    2. A store’s mobile app and its chatbot assistant
    3. A chatbot through the store’s social media page

    If John selects a product online and decides to collect it at the retail store, we’d call that retail trend “Click and Collect.” But if John schedules an appointment at the store to test the product and then decides to purchase it, he’ll be using the “Click and Reserve” model. If he does go with the “Click and Reserve” option, a trial room would then be available for John to try out the product or the store would provide a consultant to demonstrate the product at a specified time.

    In case of a fashion or luxury product, the store is equipped with smart mirrors and augmented reality that enables John to try out the products very quickly. If the size or color doesn’t suit him, John can change the item by using the smart mirror & AR features.

    Alternatively, the store consultant can be informed during the whole process using a chatbot assistant. In this case, the store consultant gets an alert on his digital assistant to provide help to the customer. This enhances John’s shopping experience by saving him the extra effort while the store reduces the risk of damage or theft.

    Smart mirrors and augmented reality can help shoppers try products quickly

     

    In case the product is not available, the store would then have a real-time ERP system and up-to-date information linked to its warehouse that can assist John by telling him the product availability. If the item is available, John can request to get it shipped to his home—called the “Select and Ship” model.

    Alternatively, he could also schedule another appointment to test it again when it’s in store. This technology could eliminate the issue of a more limited assortment that traditional retailers experience vs. online retailers.

    Scenario 2: Providing transparency and relevance

    While John is walking down the street near a store, he can also receive a message regarding new products or discounts. If John is already an existing customer, he can also get notified of loyalty offers. This is possible using technologies like beacons, Geo-fencing and Near Field Communication (NFC). Retail trends & technology like Geo-targeting can:

    1. Create awareness among consumers who are not yet customers
    2. Retain and up-sell to an existing customer


    Electronic Shelf Labels (ESLs) and digital signage can help the retailer to efficiently control product information dissemination, pricing and promotions from a central system. Once John is in the shop, he can get to know more about the product using digital screens and signage. Using visual search screens showing the store map, John could search for the product from the screen and can directly go to the appropriate section of the store. A connected shopper experience is as a catalyst for better sales.

    The two aspects in retail trends that are driving consumer towards online channels include:

    1. Finding products or services that a consumer specifically wants
    2. General information regarding products and services

    Visual search screens showing the store map helps a customer search for the product from the screen

    Scenario 3: Delivering custom products

    If John decides to buy a shirt that he wants tailored, he can use the phone or tablet cameras to scan his measurements and features to order such a custom fit product.

    Scenario 4: Making it fun

    GfK FutureBuy tells us that buying additional items while making a routine purchase is a key driver for the customer to visit the store. If John has a mobile app which contains his shopping list, he frees up time to browse and discover other items for purchase which makes his shopping trip less like a chore. And the fun isn’t just limited to consumers—for store employees, too. Gamification can assist in shelf stocking (like a game) and can motivate the employees to finish their work in the most efficient way. A fun experience for both the customer and employee aids to the success of the retailer.

    Retail Trend #4: Cost savings with automation

    Automation whether it is hardware (e.g. autonomous warehouses and store robots/vehicles) or software (like real-time monitoring algorithms, chatbots, etc.), improves efficiency, saves time and delivers value-added services and a high-tech shopping experience.

    Scenario 1: If it’s mundane, automate it

    Instead of a real-life person, John walks into a store and is greeted by a “Greet and Guide” in-store robot which welcomes and asks questions to guide him to the appropriate section of the store. In case John asks a complicated question, the robot then generates an alert for a store consultant intervention. Another way to use robots in retail is to automate item stock and flaw detection. The value proposition for these robots is to reduce mundane tasks, giving store employees more time for value-added services like consulting the customer and providing excellent service.

    Scenario 2: Anytime, anywhere assistance

    Chatbots are already part of many automated customer support procedures and they can assist customers like John inside the store via the mobile app or social media bots. Chatbots can answer standard questions, help with recommendations, scheduling an appointment (Select & Try model) or assist John in the online purchasing workflow.

    Retail trends and technologies like automation is all about cutting cost on redundant activities and enabling more time for value-added services. Although automation needs an initial capital investment, cost savings and efficiencies are pegged to be much higher in the long-term.

     

    It’s all for the consumer

    In conclusion, retail players who align their strategy to incorporate aspects of intelligent retailing, security, creating connected experiences and automation will end up creating a more efficient, secure and transparent value chain that enhances the shopper experience. Adapting to new retail trends and technologies is essential to satiate the highly demanding, informed customer.

     

    Want more? Get answers to key business questions at GfK Insights Summit

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  • GfK releases 2019 purchasing power for Austria and Switzerland
    • 05/08/19
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Financial Services
    • Industrial Goods
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Travel and Hospitality
    • Automotive
    • Consumer Goods
    • Energy
    • Geomarketing
    • Geodata
    • Global
    • English

    GfK releases 2019 purchasing power for Austria and Switzerland

    According to GfK's latest study, the Swiss have a 2019 per capita purchasing power of €42,067, significantly outpacing the Austrians (€24,067) and Germans (€23,779). 

  • Consumer climate remains stable
    • 04/30/19
    • Press
    • Global
    • English

    Consumer climate remains stable

    Findings of the GfK Consumer Climate Study for April 2019.

  • How do Indian TV consumers make their final purchase?
    • 04/30/19
    • Technology
    • Global
    • English

    How do Indian TV consumers make their final purchase?

    Brands want to know where, how, and why consumers make final purchase on products, so that they can make smart decisions about retailer partnerships, product selection and development, and marketing and promotions. Retailers, meanwhile, need to understand how they are performing in different channels (in-store and digital), as well as which brands and models sell best and why. Manufacturers and retailers alike also want insights into competitor performance and partnerships.

    A case study of the TV market in India

    Having looked at how our Consumer Journey solution helps brands understand how consumers research a purchase in my previous post, let’s dive into the insights it offers into the moment of their final purchase.

    Truly understand all the factors that influence consumers’ final decision at the moment of purchase

    Powered by the GfK Consumer Insights Engine, our Consumer Journey offers technology and consumer durables manufacturers a full view of the online and offline consumer purchase journey. This enables them to answer key business questions, including:

    Lost shoppers

    • How many shoppers did we lose during the purchase journey and what is the size of this lost opportunity?
    • Who are these shoppers?
    • Which competitive brands or retailers did we lose out to and why? 

    Partnership opportunities:

    • Which retail or manufacturer brands should we partner with?
    • Which retailers or brands could offer access to unique customers?
    • Which competitive brands or retailers attract the same consumer profile as we do?

    Channel conversion:

    • What are my channel conversion rates?
    • How can I improve them?
    • What role does each channel play in the consumer journey?

    As a subscriber to the Consumer Journey module, you can use the Consumer Insights Engine to get instant access to insights that will allow you to answer your key business questions. To provide you the data that leads to trusted and actionable consumer insights, we seamlessly integrate multiple data sources into this advanced analytics platform: global sales data*, consumer research, behavioural data, and AI-enabled review data.

    The data visualized below is pulled from a cross-market analysis of the TV category using the Consumer Insights Engine and is used to answer many important questions our clients are asking about the moment of purchase.

    Source: Consumer Insights Engine Consumer Journey, Q2-Q4 2018 data for the TV category in multiple markets

     

    Percentage of respondents in the four key Asian markets who are influenced by Price is the lowest in India, at 69%. On the other hand, Indian consumers holds the highest regard for the product’s Features, as compared to consumers from the other markets. In addition, the product’s Brand is also a significantly more important factor for Indian consumers with 55% mentioning this as a key driver during the final purchase stage– the highest across all markets we track. Manufacturers therefore need to recognize the importance of product’s Brand and Features, and not consider Price as the only factor.

    As the data above illustrates, our solution provides a coherent view of – and granular detail about – the consumer’s purchase journey and the factors that influence his or her final purchase decision to equal granularity across participating markets, in this case, India. This data informs the marketing team that messaging around this feature should resonate in this market. When this data is coupled with data identifying that 9,304,460 TVs were sold in Q4 2018 alone in India, it can begin to inform other business units within our clients’ organisations, such as supply chain and logistics. This total market view of units sold is achieved through our calibration with actual point of sales data*.

    Fig2. Source: Consumer Insights Engine Consumer Journey, Q4 2018 data for the TV category in multiple markets

     

    Importance of Brand during the final purchase cycle

    Taking a look at the importance of Brand as a driver during the final purchase cycle in India is another practical example that highlights the value of the insights derived from the data in the Consumer Insights Engine

    Our solution covers 13 major markets – France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Spain, UK, US, Brazil, Russia, China, India, Japan and South Korea. Thus, multinational brands can not only get insights into national markets, but also compare brand performance and consumer behaviour across multiple territories.

    Note: *In the US, GfK does not have access to Point of Sales (POS) data. US data is calibrated using information gathered from a telephone survey based on probability-based sample representative of both mobile phones and landlines. No retailer data is used in the development of the US offering.

    Get an online demo of our Consumer Insights Engine to find out how to get actionable business insights at speed that go beyond point of sale data and help you get inside the mind of your consumers.

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  • Map of the Month: Six-digit postcodes, Colombia 2019
    • 04/24/19
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Financial Services
    • Industrial Goods
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Travel and Hospitality
    • Automotive
    • Consumer Goods
    • Energy
    • Geomarketing
    • Digital Maps
    • Digital Maps
    • Picture of the month
    • Global
    • English

    Map of the Month: Six-digit postcodes, Colombia 2019

    GfK's Map of the Month for April depicts the six-digit postcode boundaries for a region of Colombia.

  • The TV consumer journey in India
    • 04/23/19
    • Technology
    • Consumer Goods
    • Global
    • English

    The TV consumer journey in India

    My previous post looked at the purchase triggers in India’s television sector as an example of the insights brands can get from our Consumer Journey module of the Consumer Insights Engine. In this post, we’ll look at how the solution can give brands accurate, actionable information about how and where consumers research and evaluate their options when they are looking to purchase a new TV.

    To maximize their performance in today’s competitive retail landscape, brands need a single, accurate view of the market with instant insight into consumer purchase behavior. In this post of this blog series, I’ll look at how the GfK Consumer Journey solution delivers that and enables brands to understand how consumers do their research when they buy a new product.

    Touchpoints that drive the best ROI for your brand

    Our Consumer Journey survey data reveals that the majority of television buyers in India do their research both in-store and online. While 45% did their research only through offline channels, a majority of the remaining 55% used both offline and online channels. Only 12% customers relied solely on online channels.

    Overall, an average customer in India typically visited 1.7 physical stores while researching to purchase a TV, while those who conduct online research visited 2.8 retailer websites.

    Perhaps that’s not so surprising but our numbers also show that in-store touchpoints still play a major role in the consumer’s purchase journey. More than half (52%) of TV purchasers in India visited a physical store to research their new TV prior to purchasing. Of those who researched their options in-store, a whopping 89% went on to make their purchase in-store. It is interesting to highlight that over three-quarter (76%) of those who researched various options online, also eventually made the final purchase in-store.

     

     

    Even in a digital age, in-store advertising and displays play a major role in driving sales but as our Consumer Journey insights research shows, this does differ somewhat by brand.

    This sort of insight is invaluable to marketing teams in optimizing their online and offline marketing and advertising channel and touchpoint investments throughout the consumer journey. They will know which channels and brand/product touchpoints consumers use during their search and evaluation of new products, helping them to make better decisions about campaign execution.

    They can also see which consumers considered their brand but bought something else, and why they made that choice. We will look into why consumers in this market purchase products in my next blog post. These insights enable brands to plan ahead and improve conversion rates amongst lost shoppers. Product category managers and operations departments, meanwhile, can learn about where consumers are researching and buying product, so they can make better stocking decisions.

    We will soon be introducing online passive behavioral data to the Consumer Journey module and this will give us visibility of device use, search terms, touchpoints, sites visited and more. Brands will be given an even more granular view of the consumer’s online behavior during the purchase cycle

    One way in which GfK Consumer Insights Engine is unique is that it provides all of these insights in a single platform. This eliminates the need for multiple data and insights suppliers and provides a coherent view of your consumer’s purchase journey.

     

    Get a demo of our Consumer Insights Engine online to understand how it can help you make smart, rapid decisions

  • Retail trends and technologies – pt. I
    • 04/23/19
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • TEMAX
    • Global
    • English

    Retail trends and technologies – pt. I

    We have been hearing about digitization and the impact it might have on value chain for quite some time. But now in addition to theoretical analysis, we also see lot of commercial products and solutions surfacing at retail events which are the significant steps to realize this transitionary phase in retail. We have classified the retail trends and technologies in four parts:

    1. Intelligent Retailing
    2. Security in Retail
    3. Connected Experience
    4. Automation

    In this post, we’ll discuss two of the four retail trends and technology which stood out at EUROCIS-2019 (Dusseldorf, Germany) and NRF-2019 (New York, USA).

    Trend #1: Intelligent retailing

    GfK FutureBuy revealed that the agreement for statements like “I am now less loyal to anyone retailer” is growing year after year (4 percentage points in 3 years) especially among Gen Y and Gen Z. With growing paying parity that Gen Y and Gen Z are capable of, this emphasizes the need for the retailer to become smarter and more responsive to the changing customer behavior. What we term as intelligent retailing includes a whole ambit of technologies like Big Data, artificial intelligence, machine learning, new sensor hardware and varied solutions stemming from them.

    Dynamic pricing and inventory optimization

    These retail trends are designed to enable dynamic pricing, markdown optimization and inventory optimization so that retailers can plan quantity and pricing of their products appropriately. Simply put, cost savings for the retailer. The predictive pricing solutions include usage of daily/weekly/monthly data and uses historical trends and current sales metrics to forecast best pricing scenarios to help the retailer in promotion planning and to determine percentage of discount per product per region. Predictive inventory management and cognitive demand forecasting solutions that were demonstrated a way to optimize the stock and re-order at right junctures to reduce holding cost and unnecessary discounting to clear old stock. Using smarter inventory management tools using analytics and dashboards can also help the retailers to identify the hot-selling product categories enabling them to plan their assortment strategy in a more informed manner.

    Over the last few years, we assume that traditional retailers are feeling the pressure of being left out if they don‘t participate in new promotion formats like Black Friday, 11.11, and other events or fear a possible loss of promotion efficiency and effectiveness. Our GfK FutureBuy study shows us that the key customer motivation for shopping online is cost savings and easier shopping. The above stated reasons emphasize the need for adopting intelligent retailing solutions which might enable the retailers to become more efficient in operations and optimize their pricing when and where needed. Thus it would help retailers create a synergy between the bricks and the clicks.

    Retail technology: Dynamic pricing for seasonal sales events

     

    Facial recognition to optimize floor space

    Advanced facial or gesture recognition and optimized sensors are other solutions under this theme which enable quick recognition of products for real-time inventory tracking. Another variant of this technology is what we see at the self-checkout kiosks. Image or gesture recognition coupled with intelligent algorithms can be used for heat mapping within the store as well as outside. This technology can be used to determine “the most attractive zones” within the store and organize product allocation and shelving accordingly. It helps retailers to optimize floor space so as to stock only the key products and generate maximum ROI per square meter. Heat mapping also has applications like determining key selling periods, queue prediction and it can also help employees with in-store route analysis in store thereby reducing the time taken for stocking the shelf.

    Trend #2: Security in retail

    Proactive prevention of product theft/fraud should be a priority for retailers. Security retail trends include a whole new set of hardware + software solutions which include electronic tils, RFID tags, wet tags, sensors, enhanced cameras used in conjunction with real-time algorithms.

    Electronic tags for better tracking

    RFID tags and wet tags are typically costlier than the paper/cloth-based barcode tags but enables reuse and better tracking. These tags were marketed as optimal for scenarios like self-checkout kiosks and unmanned stores. As these tags would be used along with sensors to determine movement of a product from store inventory to a customer’s cart by means of sensors/cameras or the in-store scanner or phone application scanners can be used to add the product to the customer’s shopping cart. Enhanced cameras and sensors can be used for real-time image/gesture recognition to generate alerts and to log anomalies. These would become essential in unmanned stores. Similar security solutions can be used for warehouses. This would gain more importance as well maintained secure warehouse would be essential with the growing lucrativeness of click and mortar model.

    Retail technology: RFID tags

     

    GfK FutureBuy study shows that the hassle to return products has reduced in traditional retail has reduced from 30% in 2015 to 24% in 2018. In retail stores, many frauds are committed on the occasion of product return. Especially in scenarios when stolen products are returned against the same value receipt, it’s hard to determine if it’s a valid/invalid return. Mapping of product to such RFID/wet tags and using it in conjunction with real-time algorithms running in the background of POS systems would help to detect such false returns and prevent theft enabling smart return management. Such real-time background algorithms can also help to flag anomalous purchases e.g. when a rounded value purchase (like cigarettes and liquor) is made at regular intervals (just before store closing daily/on weekends).

    Augmented reality for retailers

    Another very interesting security retail trend is Augmented Reality. AR is usually associated with high tech experiential purchasing. This can especially beneficial to premium luxury goods stores wherein they can project a jewelry item or watch onto the customer. The customer can verify the look at feel and the retailer can enable good experience without exposing the products to a risk. It is also convenient for the customers as they won’t need to undergo the hassle of trying on multiple things.

    Online channels are growing over the last few years but GFK FutureBuy points out that consumers (even Gen Y and Gen Z) would shop in-store if it’s an enjoyable experience. Hence, making the traditional purchasing experience easier, secure and offering the right prices at right junctures will be very much essential. We will cover the other two retail trends in the next article where we discuss the connected experience offered by borderless shopping and how automation can be leveraged to making retail shopping more efficient.

     

    Want more? Get answers to key business questions at GfK Insights Summit

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  • What triggers the consumer journey in India?
    • 04/17/19
    • Retail
    • Consumer Goods
    • Global
    • English

    What triggers the consumer journey in India?

    What is POS?

    Point of Sales (POS) data tells you what consumers buy as well as when and where they make their purchase. When you calibrate this data with actionable consumer insights, you can maximize its potential in the consumer journey by understanding who the purchasers are, how and why they make their buying decisions.

    What is the Consumer Journey?

    With the GfK Consumer Journey module of the Consumer Insights Engine, you can generate high-impact insights that answer questions which include:

    • What triggers a consumers’ need to purchase?
    • What proportion of consumers are upgrading a working product and what proportion are replacing a faulty product?
    • Which marketing channels are consumers receptive to at this early stage of the purchase journey?

    The Consumer Journey module of the CIE is the only solution that provides a full view of the online and offline consumer purchase journey for the technology and consumer durables industries. Our solution takes you beyond POS* by combining sales data with market research, online consumer behavior data, and advanced analytics in a single interface.

    Note: *In the US, GfK does not have access to Point of Sales (POS) data. US data is calibrated using information gathered from a telephone survey based on probability-based sample representative of both mobile phones and landlines. No retailer data is used in the development of the US offering.

    In this series of blog posts, we’ll look at practical examples of how this new solution brings brands closer to their customers, allowing them to understand the story of a customer’s purchase from the realization of a need up to early usage. In this first post of the series, we’ll dive into how customers in India begin to buy a new television.

    What are the purchase triggers for television shoppers in India?

    Although replacing a faulty product is the key reason for over one in three (33%) consumers in India, a quarter of purchases (25%) are triggered by the desire to buy an extra unit for the home, while one in five (21%) of television purchase journeys in India begin because consumers want to upgrade their TV. The remaining 21% are accounted as first time TV buyers.

    Similar to a study done in the UK, it’s evident that a certain percentage of Indian consumers are considerably proactive and ready to seek a newer and better product even before the existing one breaks or becomes obsolete (3% bought TV within a year of purchasing a previous one while another 12% had purchased their last TV in the past 1-2 years = so 15% purchased a TV within 2 years of purchasing the previous one).

    As we can we see from this data, major tech and durable purchases no longer necessarily have a long lifespan in the Indian consumer’s home. To capitalize, brands need to dig deeper to understand which consumers are happy to replace large appliances at regular intervals and the factors that prompt them to make a new purchase:

     

     

    Half of the TV shoppers replaced an existing non-faulty product due to a change in personal income or circumstances—which is much higher than what we see in many other markets we track. This opportunity is much larger than the market of consumers who buy a new TV because they are dissatisfied with their current model. Brands should not ignore this. However, it is also worth highlighting that 23% of shoppers are brand loyal, while the majority prefers to try new brands. Customers who are 55 years or older are most loyal to the existing brand they use.

    While making their purchase decision, over half (52%) of all shoppers visited a retail store to physically evaluate their different options of TV sets, even though a higher level of 54% conducted their research online. Clearly, even in today’s digital world, the in-store experience has a significant role to play in decision making. In India, one-third of all offline sales were through four key retailers. Therefore, it is crucial that brands are partnering with the right retailers.

    Insights from our Consumer Journey module of the Consumer Insights Engine also reveal that while doing online research, chances of TV shoppers buying a particular brand increase substantially if they visit the manufacturer website.

    Key insights

    Using the Consumer Journey solution, we could quickly identify several key insights that any player in this category can act on, including:

    • Around 15% of Indian consumers are highly proactive and ready to actively replace products within two years.
    • When purchasing a new TV, brick-and-mortar stores are still a dominant influence in the decision-making process.
    • The drop from consideration to purchase varies significantly across brands – some brands lose as high as 80% of their potential customers, while some are able to retain 50% of the customers who initially considered their brand.

    These insights can be distributed to the relevant business functions to inform tactical and strategic planning processes where they can make a difference to category performance.

    My next blog will drill deeper into which specific touch points consumers interact with when they are looking for a new TV and which are most influential. In the meantime, check out our Consumer Journey demo to discover how we can help your business to make faster, smarter decisions.

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  • How Key Account Data helps you win at MediaSaturn
    • 04/16/19
    • Consumer Goods
    • Global
    • English

    How Key Account Data helps you win at MediaSaturn

    Key Account Data enhances POS reporting

    We recently announced a partnership with the Media-Saturn-Holding (MSH) to integrate their sell-out data into our Point of Sales (POS) reporting for all 14 countries in which they operate. This is a significant enhancement to our Key Account Data Reporting (KADR) as it offers our manufacturer clients access to the complete sales data for one of the biggest retailers in Europe.

    Gain a competitive advantage with Key Account Data

    The goal of these partnerships on account level is to provide the common information framework that manufacturers and retailers of technical consumer goods need to compete in today’s increasingly complex environment. With KADR manufacturers can access the same sell-out data as the retailer, allowing both parties to work together as equally informed players to engage effectively in joint category management, co-create strategies, gain efficiencies and agree on growth opportunities.

    KADR integrates individually named retailer data in our standard POS reporting. It covers all brands and items listed by a retailer and includes a panel market benchmark too. This information empowers both parties to speak the same language and to focus on their joint priorities: Meeting the needs of their customers, improving their shopping experience and, ultimately, driving growth. This is crucial in a sector where shoppers are less loyal, less engaged, and constantly on the lookout for value.

     

    Speaking the same language

    With KADR, we want to help answer key business questions our clients have about their competitive retail performance such as:

    • How do we perform versus our main competitors at the retailer?
    • Are there opportunities to build sales with the retailer?
    • Which segments are growing, and which are declining at the retailer?
    • How can I help the retailer to fill gaps and grow at the same rate as the market?

    KADR provides actionable insights that our clients use for day-to-day tactical decision-making to gain a competitive edge at a retailer and strengthen their trade relationship.

    Three major functions benefit most from this account-level intelligence:

    1. Key account sales managers often lack reliable insights into their competitive position at an individual retailer. To meet their targets, they need to get the right products promoted and listed at key retailers and outperform their competition. KADR provides full transparency of their own and competitors’ position by product life cycle, range of offer, distribution and pricing policy. Based on this, they can analyse own strengths and weaknesses at the retailer and assess potential risks and opportunities versus the competition.
    2. Category Managers are tasked with identifying growth potential with the retailer and understanding how to build sales, to develop programs to help the retailer fill gaps, and to influence range and merchandising plans at category reviews. KADR offers them a common data currency to aid effective category management. They can benchmark the sales performance of a category at the retailer versus the total panel market or a specific distribution channel and identifying and qualifying market opportunities.
    3. Trade Marketing Managers often lack reliable insights into the impact of promotional activities on their own and competitors’ sales. They need to know how to invest promotional spend most effectively: Which in-store promotions work best? What is the ideal promotional schedule? How to win more shelf space? KADR helps them track the sales success of a specific sales promotion at a retailer on single item level and compare sales results to the competition in order to optimize the trade spend.

     

    Working and growing together

    Key Account Data Reporting facilitates effective trade relationships in three fundamental ways – and the addition of MediaMarkt data reinforces this:

    1. It offers a common currency for efficient category management as it provides consistent sales channel breakdowns and indisputable performance insights into category, segment, brands, and items.
    2. The reporting is simple, structured, actionable and comparable with regular POS data–perfect for busy teams.
    3. Users get the complete picture of the total market. They see not only how they perform at a retailer, but how their competitors do too. This is extremely powerful when negotiating with retailers.

    KADR is the starting point of effectively analyzing own and shared business performance and we believe it will transform the way manufacturers and retailers work and grow together.

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  • Map of the Month: GfK Retail Turnover, Germany 2019
    • 03/29/19
    • Financial Services
    • Retail
    • Geomarketing
    • Geodata
    • Global
    • English

    Map of the Month: GfK Retail Turnover, Germany 2019

    GfK's Map of the Month for March illustrates the forecasted 2019 regional distribution of brick-and-mortar retail turnover in Germany.

  • Recording: GfK webinar “RegioGraph 2019: New features”
    • 03/29/19
    • Geomarketing
    • RegioGraph
    • Geodata
    • Global
    • English

    Recording: GfK webinar “RegioGraph 2019: New features”

    Watch the recording of our GfK webinar "RegioGraph 2019: New features".