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  • German consumer climate stable at a good level
    • 11/28/17
    • Press
    • Global
    • English

    German consumer climate stable at a good level

    Findings of the GfK Consumer Climate study for November 2017.

    • 11/27/17
    • Consumer Goods
    • Global
    • English

    Integrated kitchens: A healthy market with attractive opportunities

    The future of the kitchen is bright, with integrated kitchens and connected built-in appliances emerging as key trends in a healthy market with attractive opportunities for brands. 32.3 million integrated kitchens were sold globally in 2016, with China being far and away the number one leading market at 18.1 million integrated kitchens sold. However, accelerated growth is expected globally with all major regions forecasting to be positive in 2017 and beyond. While Asia shows the biggest growth potential, built-in connected appliances have been a major innovation driver in Western Europe, specifically in Germany which accounts for two thirds of the market.

    Taking a closer look at leading edge consumers in China

    ‘Western’ appliances like dishwashers, (steam) ovens and microwaves are mainly sold with premium pre-decorated flats to date. We expect a spill-over into the mass market over the coming years as Western manufacturers ramp up production capacities for such appliances in China. Still integrated cabinets, along with hoods and built-in hobs will also in the nearer future be the main driver for the double digit value growth potential of the integrated kitchen market in China.

    The market has benefitted from a unique channel shop type structure, with cabinet stores (37% of sales), built-in appliance stores (31%), kitchen and appliances stores (30%) and DIY superstores (2%) all contributing to its success. With a market value size of 118 billion CNY in 2016, China’s integrated cabinet market is expected to continue to grow steadily and should experience ~15% year over year growth with a projected market value of 155 billion CNY in 2018 and 177 billion CNY in 2019.

     

    Connected appliances – A fast growing niche in Western Europe

    In Western Europe, connected built-in appliances have been a major innovation driver as a fast growing niche. Germany has taken a commanding lead in market share this year (67%), followed by Austria (7%) and Great Britain (6%), according to measurements of fourteen Western European countries by GfK Point of Sales Tracking.

    Factors contributing to market strength

    Changing household structures and a significantly increasing number of one and two person households have been a positive baseline factor for the integrated kitchen market. In Asia, massive growth of the Middle Class is another contributing factor of note.

    Integrated kitchens have proven to be a healthy market with attractive opportunities. Knowing which markets have the greatest growth potential and which products are driving innovation are the insights that will prove to be most valuable to brands.

    For more information on our sales data for major domestic appliances (as well as small domestic appliances and other product groups), please email me at anton.eckl@gfk.com.

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  • Christian Erlandson joins GfK as Chief Customer Officer and completes Executive Leadership Team
    • 11/23/17
    • Press
    • Global
    • English

    Christian Erlandson joins GfK as Chief Customer Officer and completes Executive Leadership Team

    GfK appoints Christian Erlandson as Chief Customer Officer.

    • 11/22/17
    • Health
    • Travel and Hospitality
    • Global
    • English

    What does living ‘the good life’ really mean? Hear it from consumers

    When we think about “living the dream” or “living the good life”, we usually think about health, family, work, experiences and finances.  But what is really the most important in the eyes of consumers, and how do those factors stack up against each other?

    This was the focus of our most recently published global study, where we asked thousands of consumers around the world about which factors they personally see as being an essential part of ‘the good life’ or the life they’d like to have.  Would the results differ by age group or from country to country?  And have any new trends emerged this year?

    Here are the factors in order of international popularity, according to consumers.

     

    Top factors internationally

    As seen above, the top ranking factors internationally for being part of “the good life” are good health, financial security, and free time/leisure time, followed by a happy marriage, the ability to travel for leisure, owning a home, control over one’s own life and a job that is interesting.

    What’s also revealing is the factors that rank lower on the list, such as children, spiritual enrichment, having a nice yard and a lawn, and having a luxury car or second car.

    For brands and marketers, the results of this global study have implications on the future and what consumers value most.  Are your products and services aligned with the consumer’s vision of their ideal life?  What kind of messaging and advertising will resonate best with consumers and which products and services have the most increasing or decreasing mass appeal?

    In digging a little deeper, we see that there are variances for each age bracket, with younger age groups seeing a college education as more essential to the good life, and older age groups placing more emphasis on financial security.  Clearly, those with more life experience value the security blanket that health and wealth provides, whereas it could be argued that the younger demographic trends more toward prioritizing accumulating those life experiences.

    What are the differences regionally?

    To help identify specific market opportunities, we offer a country by country breakdown of the results from our global study.

     

    Financial security, which is the second highest ranking factor internationally, has the most resonance with consumers in Russia, followed by Germany and Belgium.  On the other hand, when it comes to travelling for leisure as part of the good life, Argentina takes the lead, followed by Brazil and Spain.

    What this means for brands

    So what does it really mean to live the good life, and how can businesses respond?  As consumers internationally increasingly value time and experiences over materials and possessions, balanced with more practical factors like good health and financial security, they will continue to look to brands to help them achieve the life they’d like to have.  The brands that are able to deliver on fulfilling this promise will live “the good life” of their own, with a healthy business, financial security, and control of their own life.

    About the study

    The survey question asked, “When you think of the Good Life – the life you’d like to have – which of the things on this list, if any, are part of that Good Life as far as you, personally, are concerned?: A home you own; Good health; A happy marriage; A job that is interesting; Children; A yard and lawn/a nice garden; Free time/leisure time; Spiritual enrichment; A college education; Financial security; A luxury car or second car; Travel for leisure; Really nice clothes / accessories / jewelry; Having the latest electronics and gadgets for my home; Control over one’s own life; None of the above; Don’t know”

    GfK interviewed 23,000 consumers online in 17 countries in the summer 2017. Data are weighted to reflect the demographic composition of the online population aged 15+ in each market. The global average given in this release is weighted, based on the size of each country proportional to the other countries. 4 Countries included are Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Netherlands, Russia, South Korea, Spain, UK and USA.

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  • Bringing fully integrated audience measurement to Singapore
    • 11/22/17
    • Global
    • English

    Bringing fully integrated audience measurement to Singapore

    With the ability to measure live TV viewers and those streaming TV content SG-TAM delivers key data to the industry in Singapore. Read more.

  • Less than half say ‘children’ are part of the good life; less than a quarter say ‘college education’
    • 11/22/17
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global Study
    • Global
    • English

    Less than half say ‘children’ are part of the good life; less than a quarter say ‘college education’

    When it comes to the factors that make up ‘the good life’, the most popular items for people internationally are good health, financial security and leisure time, followed by a happy marriage, travel for leisure, a home you own, and control over one’s life. 

  • Creating a new sales structure to exploit more market potential
    • 11/21/17
    • Technology
    • Geomarketing
    • Global
    • English

    Creating a new sales structure to exploit more market potential

    "We're very pleased with the territory optimization and already experienced positive results shortly after the implementation.“

  • Sharpening a technology giant’s edge in global ecommerce
    • 11/21/17
    • Technology
    • Product Catalogs
    • Global
    • English

    Sharpening a technology giant’s edge in global ecommerce

    We help Acer optimize and enhance its product data and get a consistent message out fast to 56 markets in 27 languages.

  • Factors that make up the Good Life
    • 11/20/17
    • Global Study
    • Global
    • English

    Factors that make up the Good Life

    Good health, financial security and control over one’s own life are more popular among older age groups as part of their vision of a good life. Explore further results - in our global study!

  • Global study: good life factors
    • 11/20/17
    • Global Study
    • Global
    • English

    Global study: good life factors

    Find out which factors are most popularly seen as being part of ‘the good life’ – and compare results across different countries.

    • 11/16/17
    • Global
    • English

    Improving country reputation: Better to be great in many areas, or the best in one?

    This blog was cowritten by Vadim Volos and Kristin Pondel of Social and Strategic Research at GfK.

    How the global public views a country strongly influences the success of its business, investment, and tourism efforts – as well as its diplomatic and cultural relations with other nations – and inattention to public perception risks diminished international “market share” for countries.

    With a new set of leading nations emerging in the 2017 Anholt-GfK Nation Brands Index that includes an overhaul in the rankings within the top-10 nations, it begs the question: which quality better secures a leading nation’s standing in the global public’s eyes – deepening appreciation for a signature strength or maintaining a well-rounded image?

    This year’s top-ranked nation, Germany, and Japan, ranked joint 4th overall this year, demonstrate each of these qualities.

    Case of Germany: Showing strength on multiple dimensions

    Germany earns the top-spot among the nations overall this year. Facilitating the country’s rise in the rankings is the well-rounded nature of its reputation. Germany’s reputation derives its strength from multiple dimensions. In fact, Germany boasts top-five finishes on five out of six dimensions underpinning overall country reputation (Germany is 3rd on Exports, 4th on Governance, 4th on Culture, 4th on People, and joint 2nd on Immigration and Investment). This is most top-five finishes of any nation, making Germany’s reputation the most-balanced of all nations.

    As a result, Germany depends on its strong finishes on each of these dimensions to elevate it to the top of the leaderboard, rather than resting on a 1st-place finish on any single dimension.

    Case of Japan: Owning a single, signature strength

    Unlike other top-ranked nations, Japan draws its reputational strength from a single source. The global public believes that Japan’s Exports are without parallel, awarding the country with a 1st-place ranking this year. Japan’s climb in the rankings (from 7th to 4th) includes broadening appreciation for its Exports since 2016, when it ranked 2nd behind the U.S. This year marks the first time Japan finds itself within the top-five nations since 2011.

    Exports clearly stand out as Japan’s reputational anchor. In the last five years, Japan has never earned a top-five spot on any of the other Nation Brand Index (NBI) dimensions. Nor has Japan managed to place among the top-five nations overall without being anything less than the global best on the Exports dimension. But, when a country’s image is not stanchioned by other strengths, even marginal changes in perception of its strongest category can have an impact on its overall standing. If Japan were to develop a greater global appreciation for the other dimensions of reputation, it would help insulate the country’s reputation against small changes on a single dimension.

    Conclusion

    A robust, well-rounded reputation is the key to safeguarding or improving a nation’s overall reputation. More often than not, leading nations lead on multiple dimensions. Consistency in its image is crucial – seldom does a signature strength lift a nation’s reputation into the top overall. Furthermore, relying on a single strength can create volatility in a nation’s reputation year after year.

    Vadim Volos is the Global Director of Social and Strategic Research at GfK. He can be reached at vadim.volos@gfk.com. Kristin Pondel is a Research Director of Social and Strategic Research at GfK. She can be reached at kristin.pondel@gfk.com.

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  • Germany reclaims top “nation brand” ranking, with USA dropping to sixth place
    • 11/16/17
    • Public Services
    • Brand and Customer Experience
    • Public Communications and Social Science
    • Global
    • English

    Germany reclaims top “nation brand” ranking, with USA dropping to sixth place

    France leaps to second place for first time, since 2009, while UK regains ground to remain third and Japan enters top five for first time since 2011. USA is only country showing overall decline in 2017. Germany shows major gains in Governance, People, and Culture.

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