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    • 01/18/18
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    Why is cross-media so important?

    Why do we need to track consumers across all channels and devices? Why can’t we just track their behaviour on one device, for example?

    Well, the answer is that we can, but then we’d be getting a false view of their real behaviour. We’d only see one aspect of how, where and why they are interacting with your own, or your competitors’, promotional content, products or services.

    A typical customer journey usually involves many stages from discovery to purchase, using many different touchpoints across multiple devices. Unless we analyse all of those data traces, we will not get a truly accurate single consumer view.

    The challenge is to think ‘cross-media’ right from the start, and to break up silos by using digital as the connector.

    Recent cross-media trends from 8 countries:

    We run regular research looking at device use and online behaviour in 15 countries. This is passively collected behavioural data, which creates a valuable and easy-to-use round-up of the cross-media metrics that matter.

    In this blog, we’ll share some top trends from eight very different markets: Germany, Mexico, UK, Poland, Russia, Indonesia, Brazil and Netherlands.

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    4 cross-media trends from our full report

    1. Multi device is the norm

    What is abundantly clear is that tracking data from single device use cannot provide a full enough picture to be reliable or truly useable. While we track the use of smartphones, tablets and PCs, it is interesting to see how these devices are used in combination. For example, how many smartphone users also use tablet and/or PC?

    Singular device usage still exists, but nearly three quarters of the online population in the eight markets we have analysed use at least two or more devices

    There is a higher percentage of single device use in some emerging markets. For example, in Indonesia, almost 4 in 10 (37%) of the online population use smartphone only. This is largely due to limited availability of fast landline internet, so that desktops and PCs have not penetrated the market in the same way as in Europe. The price decrease for smartphones and cheap data has been much faster than investments in landline infrastructure. Not only is a high share of mobile usage for smartphones, but also smartphones and tablets – 28% of the online population in Indonesia use these two devices combined.

    In addition, Poland stands out as having the highest percentage of PC-only users (30%) compared to the on other markets.

    However, in a developed market such as the UK, nearly 4 in 10 (39%) of the online population use smartphone, PC and tablet, while only 7% use tablet and PC. In Italy, half the online population use both PCs and smartphones.

    2. Most popular online activities – by country, and by device

    Based on net reach, the top activity that people perform across all devices (PCs, smartphones and tablets) is reading news or information, or accessing search sites.

    The exceptions for this are Indonesia, where shopping is the top activity across all devices, and Brazil, where communication is most popular. In Brazil, communication apps are particularly popular for messaging and emailing.

    When we view devices separately, there is clear division in use between PCs and mobile devices. People are using PCs for reading news or information and performing web searches, and using their tablet or smartphone for communication and shopping.

    A key takeout here is that shopping is the top activity on mobile devices in four out of the eight countries, highlighting the importance of mobile advertising for eCommerce and in-store shopping in these markets. This prevalence of mobile highlights the importance of mobile-enabled webpages and apps with good UX to support eCommerce.

    3. Looking at duration shows key differences between countries

    Looking at duration of activity (average hours per month, per user) for each category, we see that social networking and communication are the top ranked categories in terms of time spent across all three devices. However, there is a lot of variation between the different countries.

    For example, ‘communication’ is the top activity on mobile devices in both Indonesia and Germany. But in Indonesia, the duration is 27 hours – compared to 16.4 hours in Germany. And people in Mexico spend more than twice as much time on social networking as people in Poland (30.3 hours compared to 14.6 hours, respectively).

    By looking at duration, we also see that, while we are all addicted to our smartphones, this is especially true in certain countries. In Poland, the average online user spends 34 hour per month on their smartphone – but in Netherlands this rises to nearly double that, at 64 hours per month.

    4. Most-used websites and apps (based on reach)

    It’s probably no surprise to see that Google is the number one most-used website or app, based on reach, in seven of the eight countries presented in this blog.

    The exception is Russia, where Yandex takes the top spot (Yandex is a similar platform to Google which includes Yandex Search, Yandex Mail, Yandex Maps, Yandex Images, Yandex News etc, and even includes a taxi app very similar to Uber).

    Similarly, Facebook is the number one social network site, except for Russia where it is VKontakte (VK).

    When it comes to streaming, however, the top site is the same across all eight countries: YouTube.

    Achieving a single customer view

    Integrating data from all sources in one platform allows us to connect the dots and gain a true picture of our consumers. Ultimately, data trails are generated by real people that leave data in many different silos. Digital is the connecter that helps open these silos as all the data traces are left in the digital world. By opening these silos and integrating data from different sources we can achieve that all important single customer view.

    Pawel Gershkovich is a Global Senior Product Manager at GfK. To share your thoughts, please email pawel.gershkovich@gfk.com or leave a comment below.

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  • Map of the month: GfK Purchasing Power Germany 2018
    • 01/18/18
    • Financial Services
    • Retail
    • Consumer Goods
    • Geomarketing
    • Geodata
    • Global
    • English

    Map of the month: GfK Purchasing Power Germany 2018

    GfK's map of the month for January shows the distribution of per-capita purchasing power in Germany in 2018.

    • 01/18/18
    • Technology
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global
    • English

    Xennials: An untapped opportunity for marketers

    Much has been written about US generations for, well, generations. Starting with the “Lost Generation” that fought in World War I right up to our present-day debates about what to call the Post-Millennial audience, Americans have an endless fascination with the differences between these seemingly distinct and roughly 20-year age groups. But as society and technology evolve at a faster rate than ever, perhaps the parameters for each generation will shrink over time?

    The “Xennial” generation is a term recently coined for those stuck sandwiched by Gen X and those industry killers, the Millennials. Born (roughly) between 1977 and 1983, this group is caught between two worlds in more ways than one. They grew up as technology did, learning to use computers and cell phones in their teen and college years. Many were hit hardest by the tech bust, 9/11, and the Great Recession, which happened at critical moments in their nascent careers. And they exhibit a curious mix of the cynicism of their Xer elders and the optimism of their younger counterparts.

    Recent research from GfK Consumer Life uncovers how Xennials serve as the bridge between the infinitely dissected Millennials and oft-neglected Generation X. A quick look at their outlooks on finance, technology, and the home spotlights a unique group worth taking more seriously.

    Confident and driven

    In spite of living through major financial instability, Xennials remain more financially bullish than their elders – and their juniors. GfK Consumer Life research shows that they’re most likely to believe that now is a good time to make purchases, feel that the US economy is fair in the opportunities it provides, and be satisfied with the amount of money they have to live on today. They also lead in the belief that the best place to put money is where it can generate income – not where it is simply the safest – and feel more strongly than adjacent age groups that being able to start your own business is still a part of the American Dream. In fact, thrift is a lower-ranked personal value for this micro-generation.

    Perhaps it’s this financial confidence that makes Xennials more content in other arenas. They’re more likely to express satisfaction with multiple aspects of life, from career and relationships to health and their social lives. And in their leisure time, they’re more apt than neighboring generations to prioritize both physical and mental challenges. Brands can leverage this outlook by providing Xennials with opportunities to try new things, take a few risks, and feel even more empowered.

    The technology tipping point

    Full disclosure: I am an Xennial (class of 1980), and nowhere is it more clear than in my relationship with technology. I had my first email account nearly a decade before my first cell phone. Today, I take full advantage of mobile technology, social media, and streaming services, but have yet to cut the cord, still subscribe to a few paper magazines, and Snapchat recently became the first app that instantly went over my head. However, I still wouldn’t hesitate to call myself tech-savvy.

    Our research at GfK Consumer Life shows a similar pattern. Xennials are more likely than Millennials and Gen Xers to see the technology they own as an expression of themselves, and you’re more likely to find innovative devices like fitness bands, VR/AR headsets, smart home appliances, 4K Ultra HDTVs in their homes. Yet many members of this unique audience still straddle the low-tech line, as they’re more apt to read magazines on a weekly basis and watch video content on something physical such as a DVD. For tech companies to effectively communicate with this group, these nuances are important to understand. “Retro releases” such as the return of the Nokia 3310 phone capitalize on this generation’s intermittent desire for simple technology – and nostalgia.

    Staying close to home

    Earlier in this century, young Americans began moving back in with their parents in greater numbers than ever before. And as of 2014, “living with parents” is now the most common living arrangement for 18-34-year-olds for the first time in the modern era. Perhaps as a consequence of this shift, Xennials today are more home- and family-centric than those both younger and older than they are. Compared to Millennials and Gen Xers, they’re more likely to describe their homes as a family haven, prioritize family bonding during their leisure time, and predict that they’ll be living close to family ten years from now.

    Interestingly, Xennials are also most apt – out of the three generations – to enjoy advertising that emphasizes the comforts of home, a clear message to marketers on where to direct their creative energies. Xennials index higher than their immediate age peers on regular at-home activities such as cooking and meal planning, but their homes also have a modern twist. They’re most likely to pay professionals to do chores to save time for themselves, and demonstrate greater interest in new home developments such as energy-efficient appliances and open floor plans. With an audience that’s more open to thinking about the home in new ways, there’s a host of new opportunities for marketers.

    The lesson for brands

    Only time will tell if the Xennials continue to differentiate themselves from those just a little older and younger than them, and if our perception of generations evolves to include narrower age ranges. But in the meantime, brands can learn powerful lessons about the needs of Americans born at a brief, pivotal time in our nation’s history.

    Rachel Bonsignore is a Senior Consultant on the Consumer Life team at GfK. She can be reached at rachel.bonsignore@gfk.com.

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  • TV Azteca launches GfK Appreciation Panel integrated with digital behavior data
    • 01/11/18
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • TV Audience Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    TV Azteca launches GfK Appreciation Panel integrated with digital behavior data

    After a successful pilot, TV Azteca has signed a contract with GfK Mexico for a content appreciation panel. This is the first GfK Appreciation Panel in LATAM and the first Appreciation Panel to be integrated with digital behavioral data.

  • Understanding net neutrality makes US consumers more likely to support it
    • 01/11/18
    • Technology
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global
    • English

    Understanding net neutrality makes US consumers more likely to support it

    A new GfK study is shedding light on one of the most talked-about subjects at this week’s CES conference – Internet (“net”) neutrality.

    • 01/09/18
    • Industrial Goods
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Distribution and Supply Chain Management
    • Point of Sales Tracking
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global
    • English

    Tech developments that will impact your supply chain in 2018

    Fast changing customer purchase cycles have made supply chains more and more complex in the tech industry. The network of resources and suppliers has significantly expanded and has increased in complexity due to globalization. Today’s businesses must be able to quickly identify changes in consumer demand in order to adapt their supply chains for maximum efficiency.

  • Germany's top 10 employers
    • 01/08/18
    • Careers
    • Global
    • English

    Germany's top 10 employers

    We are proud to be among the most popular employers.

  • At CES, GfK will help brands target a new generation of "beyond digital" consumers
    • 01/04/18
    • Financial Services
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Media Measurement
    • Shopper
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Consumer Life
    • GfK-MRI
    • Global
    • English

    At CES, GfK will help brands target a new generation of "beyond digital" consumers

    At this month’s CES, GfK will draw on exclusive research into the Now Generation (ages 15 to 25) to help brands succeed with tomorrow's most valuable consumers.

  • German consumer climate: High Spirits Continue
    • 12/22/17
    • Retail
    • Consumer Goods
    • Global
    • English

    German consumer climate: High Spirits Continue

    Consumers in Germany still appear to be in high spirits at the end of 2017.

    • 12/18/17
    • Technology
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Global
    • English

    …of “things” to come in 2018

    As we slowly close the door on 2017, two things are quite clear in the marketplace:

       

    • Consumer confidence is at an all–time high
    • FOMO (Fear of Missing Out) is alive and well in the digital and tech space
    •  

    The proliferation of binge watching (361,000 watched the entire Stranger Things 2 on the first day, 15.8 million watched the first episode within the first three days of release), the record $5 billion spent on Black Friday and the biggest Cyber Monday ever, and even the staggering and near inexplicable growth of cryptocurrencies (Coinbase, a Bitcoin exchange, now has more users than Charles Schwab) all point to a cultural normalization of tech-led lifestyles in the US.

    Recent research from GfK Consumer Life shows that almost half of Americans see the technology they own as a form of self-expression, and nearly 70% of students claim to be technologically savvy or smart. It is now abundantly clear that the audience for the next big thing is increasingly the mainstream American.

    Looking ahead to 2018

    2017 introduced us to the smart home en masse, while artificial reality arguably gained traction over virtual reality. The connected car gained traction, and voice-assistance struck a chord. Looking forward, expect the Internet of Things to become a firmer reality in 2018. CES 2018 will undoubtedly showcase a proliferation of smart home devices, new, and cleverer ways to consume media and entertainment on the go, and even more complex algorithms to power AI towards increasingly intimate and personalized interfaces.

    2018 will also be the year of voice-activation as Siri, Alexa, Cortana, and others position themselves for popularity, and access to your wallets. As with all innovation, some will live long and endure, some will be transitional stepping stones to something better, while still others will struggle or crash and burn.

    How innovation can thrive

    Our research at GfK Consumer Life shows that US consumers are keener on innovation being easy to use (38%), and really solving a problem they have (32%) than necessarily being leading-edge (20%).

     

    So, as you innovate for the new year, or perhaps evaluate the riches at CES as I will, look beyond the marketing and take a consumer-first approach to evaluating the fit of new innovations with your technology strategies. Ask yourself:

       

    • What significant consumer need does the technology fulfill, and what recognizable benefit does it provide?
    • What is the average learning curve? How complex or intuitive will it be to adopt into their lives?
    •  

    If you can readily answer both, it’s a good bet that you’ll know which things will become a reality.

    Eric Wagatha is a Senior Vice President of the Consumer Life division of GfK. He can be reached at eric.wagatha@gfk.com or on Twitter at @ewagatha.

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  • Map of the month: Anholt-GfK Nation Brands Index study, 2017
    • 12/14/17
    • Global
    • English

    Map of the month: Anholt-GfK Nation Brands Index study, 2017

    This year’s Anholt-GfK Nation Brands IndexSM study finds that a robust, well-rounded reputation is the key to safeguarding or improving a nation’s overall Reputation.

    • 12/12/17
    • Health
    • Global
    • English

    Five ways brand teams can align messages and touchpoints for greater commercial effectiveness

    Commercial effectiveness 2.0

    Now that many biopharma companies have turned their focus to professional and patient centricity, and even more have upped their game by using multiple, specialized experience points to serve doctors and patients better, it is time to bring the new approach to maturity by increasing coordination and effectiveness in the new multi-channel models.

    How will you meet the challenges of this new pharma/biotech commercial model?  We would like to share five ways to improve the metrics and analytics that help you optimize your combined sales force, touchpoints and message recall, and meet the challenges of this new pharma/biotech commercial model. Depending on your current business challenges, at least one approach is very likely to help you as we move into this new biopharma commercial model.

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    Five of our analytical approaches to set the wheels in motion:

    1. Improve the measurement of your competitive standing with a multidimensional share of voice

    While you may be winning share of voice with reps alone, you may be falling behind in the overall race. Consider tracking your multidimensional touchpoint reach for a more holistic and accurate guidepost.

    2. Coordinate multiple touchpoints, with the sales rep at the center

    Biopharma’s use of multichannel to reach no-see physicians has matured. Now, forward-leaning marketing and sales leaders are leveraging “rep- triggering” technology to meet customer needs. Fully leverage reps’ clearer perspective of physicians’ imperatives, and empower reps to meet customer needs. Then measure the commercial impact of the new multi-touchpoint experience.

    3. Combine the optimal set of touchpoints to improve the overall customer experience

    The needs of healthcare professionals (HCPs) are increasingly complicated. Use multi-touchpoint analytics to find the combination of touchpoints that does the best job of meeting those crucially important customer needs.

    4. Focus on impactful messages for greater impact on prescribing behavior

    Reach doesn’t matter if the message isn’t relevant. And a high-impact message that isn’t remembered is a lost opportunity. Many brands still focus too much on the percent of physicians who recall messages. In celebrating the success of high recall for some messages, they forget to test each message’s impact, and then they miss the insight that recall may be the lowest on messages that have the greatest impact on prescribing behavior.

    5. Concentrate marketing investments on the most effective touchpoints for your critical messages

    Each touchpoint can have a higher or lower transmission effectiveness for your critical messages. Brand teams and sales forces need to remember to assess their portfolio of touchpoints with regard to their effectiveness in transmitting key messages. Message transmission lets brand teams focus their investments on those touchpoints that get critical messages across to the physicians who need to know.

    Begin driving commercial effectiveness for your brand

    By applying our techniques, you’ll discover how you can align messages and touchpoints to optimize their impact.

    For a deeper dive into these five techniques for driving your brand’s commercial effectiveness, download our white paper, “Five ways brand teams can align messages and touchpoints for greater commercial effectiveness”.

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    Then let’s start a conversation so we can help guide you in the process.

    Tom Hartley is Senior Vice President of GfK’s Health business. He can be reached at tom.hartley@gfk.com.

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