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  • Consumer climate in Germany is on the rise
    • 01/30/19
    • Retail
    • Global
    • English

    Consumer climate in Germany is on the rise

    Findings of the German GfK Consumer Climate Study for January 2019

  • CES 2019:  A Tipping Point for the Consumer-Technology Relationship?
    • 01/25/19
    • Technology
    • Consumer Life
    • Global
    • English

    CES 2019:  A Tipping Point for the Consumer-Technology Relationship?

    You just could not miss it at CES 2019. As the monorail snaked its way north towards the Las Vegas Convention Center, there it was. The Apple advertisement, “What happens on your iPhone stays on your iPhone”. A lot has already been written about this advertisement – how clever and cheeky it was, how it was a not-so-subtle dig at Amazon, Google and Facebook (among others), its factual veracity.

    But at the heart of Apple’s advertisement at CES is the issue of privacy. It is not just about what the big tech players are doing — or not doing — about privacy; it is also essential to remember and recognize how people feel about technology, its impact and how this is changing. Because understanding this shifting landscape is going to be critical for future success for tech (and indeed non-tech) brands. Even in this AI- VR- AR- 5G – next gen — world, there is still a fundamental truth – marketers need to develop what consumers want. You can have the best technology in the world, but if the consumer does not embrace it or see the value, you are not going to have commercial success.

    We are now at an inflection point in terms of how consumers are thinking about technology. When we look back, we believe that 2018 will have marked the start of a fundamental re-assessment on the impact of technology in our lives. Certainly, there were many high-profile events that happened last year that put this under a spotlight — from GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) going into effect to Mark Zuckerberg’s testimony before Congress to numerous high-profile data breaches that affected millions of people. It is against this backdrop where we see the beginnings of attitudes shifting.

    Are we healthy?

    One article that has gotten quite of bit of buzz recently addresses the trend in Silicon Valley where workers at the largest tech companies are putting many limits on how technology is used within their own households. Outside of Silicon Valley, the “Wait Until Eighth” movement supports parents and communities in delaying the age at which a child gets a smart phone until 14 stating, citing reasons such as “smart phones are changing childhood” and “smart phones are addictive”. This is very much aligned with recent research from GfK Consumer Life , our global study of consumer trends. More than a third of consumers around the globe state that they “regularly take a break from technology or unplug to maintain health”. What is most notable about this figure is that it has gone up 14 points since 2014, a significant increase. The thought that too much technology might be harmful to our health is one indicator of the reassessment of tech’s role in our lives.

    Are we present?

    The notion of being “present” is not a new one — the book “Be Here Now” was written in 1971 – but it certainly takes on new urgency in today’s always-on environment. Google searches on the word “mindfulness” have increased tenfold since 2004. Another area where our research shows a reassessment with technology is around presence and mindfulness. Just as we see an increase in people all around the world taking a break from tech for their health, we also see a significant rise in the amount of people who believe the “Internet is a good thing, but I worry that too much technology can be a bad thing.” Today, 70% of Americans agree with this statement, up 12 points since the beginning of this decade. We are already seeing more options for the consumer to monitor their technology usage, such as screen time diagnostics.

    Are we safe?

    Lastly, 2018 may mark the beginning of a tipping point in terms of consumers thinking about privacy and security implications of their technology usage. Eighty-two percent of Americans have voiced some concern over their social media footprint. GfK Consumer Life research shows that 17 percent of global consumers place their personal information falling into the wrong hands as one of their top two or three personal concerns, double the number who said this in 2009. While other worries — such as inflation, crime and the threat of terrorism — are seen as more pressing, none of the others have seen such a steady and sustained increase over time.

    Today, we are at an inflection point in how we think about technology. Technology can be distruptive — but so can consumers‘ attitudes. Truly investing in an understanding of the tech future means focusing not just on 5G and smartphones; it requires a commitment to studying and respecting the changing needs and desires of the people who will use (and buy) that technology.

     

    Are you interested in further information?

    Read our latest press releases about the global market for technical consumer goods and consumer electronics.

     

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  • Map of the Month: GfK Purchasing Power, Germany 2019
    • 01/14/19
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Financial Services
    • Industrial Goods
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Travel and Hospitality
    • Automotive
    • Consumer Goods
    • Energy
    • Geomarketing
    • Geodata
    • Picture of the month
    • Global
    • English

    Map of the Month: GfK Purchasing Power, Germany 2019

    GfK's Map of the Month for January shows the projected distribution of purchasing power in Germany in 2019.

  • GfK strengthens ties with Segment of One (SO1)
    • 01/09/19
    • Retail
    • FMCG
    • Consumer Panels
    • Global
    • English

    GfK strengthens ties with Segment of One (SO1)

    GfK and SO1 are announcing a worldwide partnership giving GfK clients access to SO1’s unique AI and targeting capabilities.

  • Global market for technical consumer goods exceeds the one-trillion mark
    • 01/07/19
    • Home Appliances
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Point of Sales Tracking
    • Global
    • English

    Global market for technical consumer goods exceeds the one-trillion mark

    The global market for technical consumer goods (TCG) exceeded the one-trillion mark for the first time in 2018 with sales of €1.01 trillion. 

  • The global market for consumer electronics continues to grow
    • 01/07/19
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Point of Sales Tracking
    • Global
    • English

    The global market for consumer electronics continues to grow

    The global market for consumer electronics ended the year 2018 with a six percent increase in sales while total sales of around €138 billion were recorded.

  • Infographic: Technical consumer goods market exceeds one-trillion mark
    • 01/07/19
    • Home Appliances
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Point of Sales Tracking
    • Global
    • English

    Infographic: Technical consumer goods market exceeds one-trillion mark

    The global market for technical consumer goods exceeded the one-trillion mark for the first time in 2018 with sales of €1.01 trillion. This is a four percent increase on the previous year. 

  • German Consumer Climate gets stable start to New Year
    • 12/21/18
    • Press
    • Global
    • English

    German Consumer Climate gets stable start to New Year

    Findings of the GfK Consumer Climate Study for December 2018.

  • Map of the Month: GfK Purchasing Power density, Europe 2018
    • 12/20/18
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Financial Services
    • Industrial Goods
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Travel and Hospitality
    • Automotive
    • Consumer Goods
    • Energy
    • Geomarketing
    • Geodata
    • Digital Maps
    • Digital Maps
    • Picture of the month
    • Global
    • English

    Map of the Month: GfK Purchasing Power density, Europe 2018

    GfK's Map of the Month for December shows the 2018 distribution of purchasing power density (mil. € per km²) across Europe at the two-digit postcode level.

    • 12/19/18
    • Technology
    • Global
    • English

    Gaming as an ecosystem: in search of superior (gaming) experiences

    Gaming PCs continue to be one of the positive drivers of growth on a PC market which has stagnated in the last few years. Gaming is not a local phenomenon, but a global trend which is reflected in the demand for unique experiences and high-performance devices the world over. Enthusiastic customers must reach deep into their pockets for an outstanding gaming experience as well as strong performance as these devices are normally to be found in the premium price categories. Nevertheless, this situation does not seem to be an obstacle for eager gamers since they are prepared to pay more than one and a half times the average price for a gaming PC.

    Solid double-digit sales growth

    In total, gaming and gaming-capable PCs generated revenues of more than 12 billion USD in the first ten months of 2018, which accounted for 19 percent of total PC sales. As a result, gaming PCs achieved a +31 percent increase in sales compared to the same period in the previous year. Their growth remained stable within the double-digit range, but was lower than the positive growth of +55 percent in 2017. The share of gaming PCs grew from 6 percent in 2016 to just under 12 percent in the period from January to October 2018, while at 7 percent, gaming capable PCs had to endure a decrease in turnover (2016: 8 percent).


    Light price fluctuations in gaming PCs; gaming capable desktops more strongly affected

    With reference to global developments, gaming PCs are representative of two central trends: performance and premium. Correspondingly, the prices set are not surprising, especially in the premium segment. In the period from January to October 2018, the average price of a gaming notebook showed a slight increase of +4 percent to 1,100 USD, while the price of a gaming desktop was just over 1,200 USD on average. At the same time, the price of a gaming-capable desktop (including DIY PCs) grew from 680 USD to 750 USD. The prices of gaming and gaming capable PCs are contingent on, among other things, the price of components (graphics card (GPU), processor (CPU), RAM, etc.) and could trigger further fluctuations in the coming months, depending on the availability of components.


    Where to find growth?

    The largest gaming market globally by some distance (excluding North America) is China with a turnover share of more than 50 percent. Thereafter, the top 5 countries, such as Germany or France, each with 5 percent, are in the single-digit range. If we look at the top 10, there follow also Russia and Poland, which are currently performing better than Spain, Japan and South Korea. By contrast, Thailand, with a high growth rate of over +80 percent, is one of the climbers (rising star) on the gaming market and, together with Turkey, was able to overtake some of the European markets such as Sweden and the Netherlands.


    Gaming accessories: additional momentum for the gaming ecosystem

    A gaming PC is not an isolated system, but is part of a very dynamic gaming ecosystem, to which monitors, mice, keyboards, headphones (headsets) and even chairs belong. In 2017, the value of gaming monitors increased by +77 percent and achieved growth of +44 percent in the first ten months of 2018. Gaming monitors with a refresh rate of 100 Hz or more performed even better and generated an increase in turnover of +92 percent in the same period, underlining the importance of performance features for gaming experiences in the high-end sector. Gaming mice and keyboards also contributed to gaming’s momentum in 2018 with sales growth rates of +13 percent and +8 percent respectively. Headphones for gaming PCs and consoles were also among the drivers of growth, with an increase in turnover of more than +50 percent. Virtual reality glasses round off the gaming ecosystem and lend a distinctive character to immersive experiences. Furthermore, ‘mixed reality’ could provide another boost for gaming.

    Gaming beyond the PC: cell phones, consoles, cloud gaming…

    Gaming is not only limited to PCs, since consumers choose between different devices and are often active on several platforms (PC & console or cell phone & console). Thanks to the multi-platform availability of games, consumers have more flexibility regarding when, where and on which device they would like to play. This means that PCs are increasingly competing with cell phones and consoles for the attention of players, which is often use-case driven. Simultaneously, there is increasing talk about cloud gaming, which leaves the performance of the PC in the background. It remains to be seen to what extent this kind of gaming will establish itself, though one thing is certain: consumers will continue to demand fascinating and spectacular visual (gaming) experiences.

    Source: GfK Point-Of-Sales Panel, International Coverage excl. North America, Sales Value USD & Price USD incl. VAT, Jan-Oct 2018

  • Black Friday sales continue to increase in Europe
    • 12/07/18
    • Retail
    • Global
    • English

    Black Friday sales continue to increase in Europe

    Discounts on so-called "Black Friday" are becoming increasingly popular among European consumers. 

  • Black Friday 2018: Tech durables turnover more than doubles compared to average week
    • 12/06/18
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Point of Sales Tracking
    • Global
    • English

    Black Friday 2018: Tech durables turnover more than doubles compared to average week

    Discounts during Black Friday week are becoming increasingly popular in Europe and beyond. Across the key markets Germany, UK, Italy, Spain, France, Poland, Brazil, Russia, 125% more turnover than in an average week was generated. Italy showed the most significant sales increase (+42%) compared to the 2017 Black Friday week and Brazilian shoppers spent the most (1.2 billion €).