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Información inteligente: medios de comunicación y entretenimiento

El sector de medios de comunicación y entretenimiento está experimentando una rápida transformación. Esto ofrece oportunidades significativas para las empresas de televisión, editoriales, agencias de publicidad de contenidos y propietarios de  plataformas digitales de contenidos  que comprendan el impacto de este cambio.

Hoy en día, la audiencia de muchos se está convirtiendo en la de uno, lo que está obligando al sector de los medios de comunicación a orientarse más a los datos. Los grupos de comunicación y de medios digitales necesitan comprender los cambiantes patrones  de consumo de hoy, lo cual implica conocer qué programas y qué contenidos son vistos a través de canales digitales y cuáles mediante medios tradicionales u otras fuentes de contenido.

Nuestros expertos en medios de comunicación y entretenimiento proporcionan una perspectiva amplia  sobre qué contenidos se están consumiendo,  en qué canales y dispositivos y por qué.
Tenemos la capacidad de transformar grandes volúmenes  datos cross-media en información inteligente y relevante gracias a nuestros equipos de data sciences   y nuestra experiencia para integrar e interpretar múltiples fuentes de información.

Los datos exclusivos de GfK incluyen información sobre audiencias, así como también, sobre consumidores y distribuidores de contenidos (por ejemplo, video on demand  (VoD), DVDs, música, libros, videojuegos y consolas). Esto nos permite medir el consumo de medios, la eficacia publicitaria y el atractivo de los contenidos. Al registrar y analizar el consumo de medios a través de canales, plataformas y dispositivos, le ayudamos a crear y ejecutar estrategias de negocio ganadoras. 

GfK, Peru
Avenida Jorge Basadre 990, San Isidro, Lima
+51 1 206 2300
Últimas tendencias

Aquí puede encontrar las últimas tendencias sobre medios de comunicación y entretenimiento. Siga leyendo

    • 07/10/18
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Automotive
    • Consumer Goods
    • Geomarketing
    • Geodata
    • Global
    • English

    Belgians’ purchasing power for food three times that of Poles

    GfK calculated the product-line purchasing power for 17 product groups in various European countries.
    • 06/15/18
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Global
    • English

    How to win the world cup with price and promotions

    A major sporting event offers a fantastic opportunity for manufacturers and retailers to take advantage of an increase in Television viewing and general spending amongst fans. No other event offers a greater opportunity than the FIFA football world cup.

    The ‘World Cup’ effect

    With the tournament kicking off in Russia this month, May and June represent crucial months for sales in the UK TV market. Our forecast is that 814,000 TV’s will be sold in the UK over these two months – an increase of over 20% against the same period in 2017. To win the lion’s share of this opportunity, TV manufacturers and retailers are focusing hard on competitive pricing and promotional activity to entice shoppers.

    ‘Bigger and better’ line-up to combat falling unit sales

    World Cup themed promotions are very evident online, with a large number of major retailers pushing promotions and football themed messaging on both category and product web pages. In addition, many are focusing on premium ranges, with promotions of larger screen sizes (55+ inches) and the latest high-resolution technologies (4K/UHD), to bring the stadium atmosphere in to the living room. In a market that has been showing a steady decline in the number of units sold over the last years, this strategic focus on promoting higher-end products can deliver increased margin levels and profitability. Throughout May 2018, the average selling price (ASP) of a 55 inch 4K/UHD TV was over £1000. Although this is still a significant outlay for the consumer, it is 23% lower compared to last year. We have also seen similar ASP decreases with other screen sizes, such as the 43-49 inch category, which is, on average, 15% cheaper in May this year than a year ago. So overall, we are seeing a market focus on promoting higher specification units at a price that makes them a more affordable proposition for customers looking for an upgrade.

    Online specialist retailers leading the promotions field

    On the day of writing, the average TV retailer has 54% of its range on promotion. Within that, the online specialist retailers are showing the largest offers for UK shoppers, with retailers, on average, offering promotional cuts of 21%, whereas major high street retailers are offering 11%.

    Summary

    Discounts on larger screen TVs and the latest display technologies look set to bring the World Cup experience closer to home for UK football fans – but will more TV sales move online this month? And will World Cup promotions help to drive growth of over 20% against last year? Watch this space for our next update. To find out more, please contact Barry Meacher at Barry.Meacher@gfk.com or Daniel Wellman at Daniel.Wellman@gfk.com Source: GfK Online Pricing Intelligence (OPI) – May – June 2017 and 2018 and GfK’s ‘The World Cup & TV sales – What’s the real impact?’
    • 02/01/18
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global
    • English

    Disrupting sports broadcasting: Hidden opportunities for sports streamers

    Winter has come for American sports fans in the best possible way, as this Sunday’s Super Bowl will be followed by two weeks of Olympic competition. I know I am not the only one eagerly awaiting live curling in the pre-dawn hours. Yet, as viewing habits change, more Americans will stream these events instead of watching them on a TV set. Younger generations are leading the streaming revolution; GfK MRI data shows that 70% of Millennials (+20 points from Americans overall) and 76% of Gen Now (+26 pts) used a streaming service like Netflix or Hulu in the last month. Streaming is essential to reach and engage younger sports fans, and Millennial sports fans in particular represent a tremendous opportunity for sports broadcasters and marketers. While 41% say they are willing to pay for sports content (+16 points from Americans overall and +12 points from sports fans overall), only eight percent currently pay for it. NBC is fully embracing streaming in February. There will be 11 hours of streaming content surrounding the Super Bowl, and for the first time the Olympic opening ceremony will be streamed live. NBC is not the only one going all in on streaming: this spring, ESPN Plus will go live, and in the fall, Turner Sports will place most of their UEFA Champions League soccer games on a new streaming service. Interestingly, teams are also shifting to streaming. In a groundbreaking partnership, MLS’s Los Angeles Football Club (LAFC) announced this week that YouTube TV will hold their local media rights. The move by LAFC and Turner Sports makes sense as soccer fans are more likely to use a streaming service than sports fans overall (57% vs 50%). While it’s clear that broadcasters are boosting the accessibility of streamed sports content to meet the needs of the market and capitalize on the sports rights they own, are they prepared to use engagement to keep fans coming back, and paying, for more? Research from GfK Consumer Life has identified a few ways to capture the opportunity that Millennial sports fans present.
    • Creating a conversation. Millennial sports fans value online communities, and 62% think that virtual interactions can be as good as in-person ones. So how can streaming outlets foster a community? E-sports platforms like Twitch are a great case study, as they allow online spectators to interact with each other and the players in real time. Perhaps TV networks can provide a way for fans to discuss the starting line-up and other key decisions in real time through their streaming services. 
    • Getting personal. Being able to customize the streaming experience will also help attract and keep Millennial sports fans, as 79% tend to prefer products that are tailored to their needs (+15 points from Americans overall). And personalization that integrates home technology and digital assistants would be even better, with Millennial sports fans being more likely to describe their home as a high tech zone (42%, +14 points from Americans overall) and 1 in 5 having a home assistant like Amazon Echo in their house. Perhaps in the future, Alexa can help tailor a viewing schedule for fans and I won’t have to go hunting to see what channel curling is on at 4 AM.
    The good news is that the engagement of Millennial sports fans can lead to advocacy. Sixty-two percent typically go out of their way to tell others about products and services they like, paving the way for future growth. While Millennials are a commonly decried as disruptors, they can truly lead the way to new revenue streams in the sports world and hopefully, a life-long relationship with teams and the content providers that connect them. Adam Swift is a Senior Analyst on the Consumer Life team at GfK. He can be reached at adam.swift@gfk.com.
    • 01/18/18
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    Why is cross-media so important?

    Why do we need to track consumers across all channels and devices? Why can’t we just track their behaviour on one device, for example? Well, the answer is that we can, but then we’d be getting a false view of their real behaviour. We’d only see one aspect of how, where and why they are interacting with your own, or your competitors’, promotional content, products or services. A typical customer journey usually involves many stages from discovery to purchase, using many different touchpoints across multiple devices. Unless we analyse all of those data traces, we will not get a truly accurate single consumer view. The challenge is to think ‘cross-media’ right from the start, and to break up silos by using digital as the connector.

    Recent cross-media trends from 8 countries:

    We run regular research looking at device use and online behaviour in 15 countries. This is passively collected behavioural data, which creates a valuable and easy-to-use round-up of the cross-media metrics that matter. In this blog, we’ll share some top trends from eight very different markets: Germany, Mexico, UK, Poland, Russia, Indonesia, Brazil and Netherlands. hbspt.cta.load(2405078, '6bd01b10-fc09-4b4c-9251-70a83828189a', {});

    4 cross-media trends from our full report

    1. Multi device is the norm What is abundantly clear is that tracking data from single device use cannot provide a full enough picture to be reliable or truly useable. While we track the use of smartphones, tablets and PCs, it is interesting to see how these devices are used in combination. For example, how many smartphone users also use tablet and/or PC? Singular device usage still exists, but nearly three quarters of the online population in the eight markets we have analysed use at least two or more devices There is a higher percentage of single device use in some emerging markets. For example, in Indonesia, almost 4 in 10 (37%) of the online population use smartphone only. This is largely due to limited availability of fast landline internet, so that desktops and PCs have not penetrated the market in the same way as in Europe. The price decrease for smartphones and cheap data has been much faster than investments in landline infrastructure. Not only is a high share of mobile usage for smartphones, but also smartphones and tablets – 28% of the online population in Indonesia use these two devices combined. In addition, Poland stands out as having the highest percentage of PC-only users (30%) compared to the on other markets. However, in a developed market such as the UK, nearly 4 in 10 (39%) of the online population use smartphone, PC and tablet, while only 7% use tablet and PC. In Italy, half the online population use both PCs and smartphones. 2. Most popular online activities – by country, and by device Based on net reach, the top activity that people perform across all devices (PCs, smartphones and tablets) is reading news or information, or accessing search sites. The exceptions for this are Indonesia, where shopping is the top activity across all devices, and Brazil, where communication is most popular. In Brazil, communication apps are particularly popular for messaging and emailing. When we view devices separately, there is clear division in use between PCs and mobile devices. People are using PCs for reading news or information and performing web searches, and using their tablet or smartphone for communication and shopping. A key takeout here is that shopping is the top activity on mobile devices in four out of the eight countries, highlighting the importance of mobile advertising for eCommerce and in-store shopping in these markets. This prevalence of mobile highlights the importance of mobile-enabled webpages and apps with good UX to support eCommerce. 3. Looking at duration shows key differences between countries Looking at duration of activity (average hours per month, per user) for each category, we see that social networking and communication are the top ranked categories in terms of time spent across all three devices. However, there is a lot of variation between the different countries. For example, ‘communication’ is the top activity on mobile devices in both Indonesia and Germany. But in Indonesia, the duration is 27 hours – compared to 16.4 hours in Germany. And people in Mexico spend more than twice as much time on social networking as people in Poland (30.3 hours compared to 14.6 hours, respectively). By looking at duration, we also see that, while we are all addicted to our smartphones, this is especially true in certain countries. In Poland, the average online user spends 34 hour per month on their smartphone – but in Netherlands this rises to nearly double that, at 64 hours per month. 4. Most-used websites and apps (based on reach) It’s probably no surprise to see that Google is the number one most-used website or app, based on reach, in seven of the eight countries presented in this blog. The exception is Russia, where Yandex takes the top spot (Yandex is a similar platform to Google which includes Yandex Search, Yandex Mail, Yandex Maps, Yandex Images, Yandex News etc, and even includes a taxi app very similar to Uber). Similarly, Facebook is the number one social network site, except for Russia where it is VKontakte (VK). When it comes to streaming, however, the top site is the same across all eight countries: YouTube.

    Achieving a single customer view

    Integrating data from all sources in one platform allows us to connect the dots and gain a true picture of our consumers. Ultimately, data trails are generated by real people that leave data in many different silos. Digital is the connecter that helps open these silos as all the data traces are left in the digital world. By opening these silos and integrating data from different sources we can achieve that all important single customer view. Pawel Gershkovich is a Global Senior Product Manager at GfK. To share your thoughts, please email pawel.gershkovich@gfk.com or leave a comment below. hbspt.cta.load(2405078, '6bd01b10-fc09-4b4c-9251-70a83828189a', {});
Soluciones
  • Marca y experiencia del cliente

    Marca y experiencia del cliente

    Las marcas están bajo presión ya que deben desarrollar conexiones emocionales y relaciones con los consumidores que son los encargados de tomar decisiones comerciales.

  • Paneles de consumidores

    Paneles de consumidores

    Su negocio se basa en sus clientes, por lo que, comprenderlos es fundamental para asegurarse que los productos y servicios atiendan sus necesidades, y para identificar las oportunidades de crecimiento. 

  • Innovación en el mundo digital

    Innovación en el mundo digital

    Cuando los consumidores compran, buscan, se comunican, recolectan información e interactúan con empresas o marcas online, lo hacen de diferentes formas dependiendo del dispositivo o la pantalla que utilicen. Asimismo, esperan tener una experiencia consistente sin importar el canal o dispositivo que usen.

  • Medición y análisis de audiencias

    Medición y análisis de audiencias

    Hoy en día existe contenido disponible en los medios, en los canales y, más posibilidades de elección de los dispositivos.

    Los anunciantes, los propietarios y compradores de los medios  deben identificar qué canales digitales y tradicionales tienen más éxito para captar las audiencias adecuadas.

  • POS Tracking

    POS Tracking

    Tanto los distribuidores como los fabricantes están siempre bajo presión para desarrollar productos y servicios que maximicen las ventas y los beneficios, a su vez, conseguir que los clientes vuelvan.

    El éxito se basa en contar con los datos de ventas del canal minoristas más actualizados, al igual que comprender qué productos y servicios tienen un buen desempeño en el mercado (y cuáles no). Con esta información, las empresas pueden establecer estrategias claras para el crecimiento comercial y aumentar el retorno de la inversión. 

  • Estrategias sobre el comprador y el punto de venta

    Estrategias sobre el comprador y el punto de venta

    La era digital sigue abriendo nuevos caminos hacia la compra, cambiando cómo y dónde compran los consumidores. Cada día se habilita el acceso a más información, a medida que los compradores se adaptan a las experiencias multiplataforma de las marcas. 

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GfK, Peru
Avenida Jorge Basadre 990,
San Isidro, Lima
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