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Información inteligente: servicios financieros

Para las entidades  financieras, el panorama competitivo se ha ampliado significativamente. La confianza (o la falta de ella) es una cuestión fundamental. Los clientes cuentan con un rápido acceso a los comentarios online, a comparaciones de productos financieros y les resulta fácil efectuar el cambio de servicios, lo que les convierte en personas muy expertas y exigentes.

Las marcas más exitosas del sector financiero ofrecen productos y servicios diferenciados para satisfacer las particulares necesidades de los clientes, al tiempo que aumentan la confianza en ellas, haciendo hincapié en una relación de transparencia y de seguridad.

Nuestros expertos en investigación para servicios financieros analizan las tendencias del mercado para ofrecer  conocimientos exactos sobre sus clientes, que le ayudarán a desarrollar estrategias de éxito para los productos y servicios de su entidad. 

Soluciones
  • Paneles de consumidores

    Paneles de consumidores

    Su negocio se basa en sus clientes, por lo que, comprenderlos es fundamental para asegurarse que los productos y servicios atiendan sus necesidades, y para identificar las oportunidades de crecimiento. 

  • Estrategias sobre el comprador y el punto de venta

    Estrategias sobre el comprador y el punto de venta

    La era digital sigue abriendo nuevos caminos hacia la compra, cambiando cómo y dónde compran los consumidores. Cada día se habilita el acceso a más información, a medida que los compradores se adaptan a las experiencias multiplataforma de las marcas. 

Últimas tendencias

Aquí puede encontrar las últimas tendencias del sector financiero. Siga leyendo

    • 10/29/18
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Financial Services
    • Industrial Goods
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Travel and Hospitality
    • Automotive
    • Consumer Goods
    • Energy
    • Geomarketing
    • Geodata
    • Digital Maps
    • Digital Maps
    • Global
    • English

    GfK releases updated maps for all of Europe

    GfK has released its Europe Map Edition 2018/2019, which includes thousands of changes to Europe's regions.
    • 09/20/18
    • Financial Services
    • Retail
    • Consumer Goods
    • Geomarketing
    • Geodata
    • Picture of the month
    • Global
    • English

    Map of the Month: Purchasing power for watches and jewelry, Italy 2017

    GfK's Map of the Month for September illustrates the distribution of 2017 purchasing power for watches and jewelry across Italy's provinces.
    • 09/03/18
    • Financial Services
    • Global
    • English

    Will the CMA league table of banks’ quality of service drive people to switch?

    Banks and building societies in the UK now have to display material in their branches and websites that shows a national ‘league table’ of banks’ quality of service. This is part of a Competition & Markets Authority (CMA) and Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) drive to create competition in the banking sector by encouraging switching.

    The question is, what affect will it have?

    We know from change behaviour models, such as Fogg, that, for behavioural change to happen, a person must have sufficient motivation, sufficient ability, and an effective trigger. All three factors must be present at the same instant for the behaviour to occur. Right now, people have the ‘ability’ to switch, provided by the Current Account Switch Service (CASS), which the CMA introduced to make switching much easier and therefore help overcome apathy.  The ‘trigger’ may well be provided by this new CMA ‘quality league table’, as people can easily see whether their account provider is better or worse than others. But that still leaves ‘motivation’. Will consumers be motivated to switch simply by believing that they will get higher quality of service elsewhere? Or will they need something more concrete, to give them sufficient motivation to switch?

    What motivates people to switch current accounts?

    At present, 5%1 of current account holders state that they are considering switching current accounts in the next 12 months, rising to 20%1 amongst those who are actively dissatisfied with their existing provider. Dissatisfaction with one’s existing account provider is clearly a strong negative motivator for switching. However, in the last 12 months, only 3.5%1 of current accounts actually did switch. This imbalance is no doubt partially due to the perceived hassle of switching accounts, despite services such as CASS. However, an additional barrier may be that people did not have a clear view of which bank could give them a better service – so they lacked a positive motivator. The CMA’s new league table of service quality will certainly go some way to bridging that gap – given that all banks and building societies providing personal current accounts now have to display the “top five” brands for four categories: Overall service quality; Online and mobile banking services; Overdraft services; and Services in branch. Other motivators that we know are already driving switching include product incentives. A good example of this is Santander’s 1|2|3 account, which offers cashback on household bills and a good interest rate on the account balance. Since its launch in 2012, Santander’s market share has risen by 2.6 percentage points1. Although very gradual, our FRS data also shows signs of customers moving away from the “Big 5” banking groups to embrace a wider range of challengers – driven by brand innovation, as well as product incentives.

    What does this all mean for banks?

    For the “Big 5” banks, the focus is likely to be on retention – ensuring they innovate to inspire and hold onto their customers. Key areas for retention include winning the mobile banking battle (a major area, as ‘convenience’ continues to grow in importance in people’s daily requirements), making branches relevant, so that they become attractors and combat challenger online and offline offerings, and ensuring their CMA ‘quality league table’ scores are strong, relative to others. For Challengers, such as Metro Bank, looking to acquire customers from the Big 5, the focus is likely to be on driving communications that emphasise “it’s easy to switch to us, we offer stellar customer experience and our proposition delivers the benefits you are seeking”.

    Conclusion on switching

    While the CMA service quality league table is unlikely to prompt a flood of switching on its own, it certainly adds an extra stepping-stone for those people considering switching. Brands who are in the top five on the CMA league table will be making the most of this independent ranking, to advertise their performance to both existing and potential customers – and working hard to ensure they retain their place. This means that brands not in the ‘top five’ on the CMA league table may be more vulnerable to customers considering switching to other brands who are flagged for their service excellence. The way to combat this is to ensure they have timely and accurate information on their full customer harmonics and experiences and understand where to innovate to improve this, to ensure their customers are not motivated to switch. Contact us: We can help you understand your customers’ current experiences, and identify areas of innovation to both retain and acquire customers <h5>Footnote:</h5> 1GfK Financial Research Survey (FRS) data to March 2018. GfK’s industry-leading Financial Research Survey (FRS) is the definitive study for UK retail financial services. Established in 1977, our research builds a complete picture of the UK financial consumer. Annually we interview 60,000 respondents, understanding consumer’s financial holdings, acquisitions, usage, and behaviour. It is a key single source of data, providing insight into consumer financial behaviour.
    • 08/16/18
    • Financial Services
    • Retail
    • Geomarketing
    • Geodata
    • Picture of the month
    • Global
    • English

    Map of the Month: Brick-and-mortar retail turnover, Europe 2018

    Brick-and-mortar retail turnover is expected to increase nominally by +2.1% across the EU-28 in 2018.
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