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Trends und Prognosen

Das Kaufverhalten der Verbraucher ändert sich schneller denn je. Produktzyklen werden kürzer, neue Angebote kommen immer schneller auf den Markt und Unternehmen müssen der Konkurrenz einen Schritt voraus bleiben. Um erfolgreich zu sein, benötigen sie präzise Umsatzprognosen – basierend auf soliden Analysen – sowie die aktuellsten Kauf- und Markttrends.

Wir bieten Ihnen detaillierte Prognosen zur Nachfrage nach technischen Geräten sowie weltweite Daten zu den Trends in Technologiemärkten.

Unsere Prognosen beruhen auf der weltweit größten Erhebung von POS-Daten. Hinzu kommen die Fachkompetenz unserer Experten auf internationaler Ebene sowie das Wissen über lokale Gegebenheiten. Dank dieser Kombination erhalten Sie einzigartige, granulare und schnelle Prognosen – Prognosen darüber, welche Produkte die Verbraucher kaufen werden, in welchen Mengen, für welchen Preis und wo.

Prognosen für Investoren und Kapitalmärkte

Investoren stehen ebenfalls unter großem Leistungsdruck. Um erfolgreich zu sein, benötigen Unternehmen bereits frühzeitig Einblicke in maßgebliche Trends. Sie müssen wissen, wo sich Investitionen lohnen.

Wir bieten Ihnen auf Grundlage der weltweit größten Erhebung von POS-Daten umfassende Prognosen. Wir führen regelmäßige, detaillierte Unternehmensanalysen im Bereich Hardwaretechnik, Halbleiter und langlebige Gebrauchsgüter durch und ermitteln so relevante Informationen über Veränderungen in der Verbrauchernachfrage.

Unsere Prognosen ermöglichen es Ihnen, Empfehlungen auszusprechen, die auf zuverlässigen Quellen beruhend.

Aktuelle Insights

Finden Sie hier aktuelle Insights aus dem Bereich Trends und Prognosen.

    • 08/02/18
    • Technology
    • Point of Sales Tracking
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Tech Trends
    • Switzerland
    • German

    Durchzogener Heimelektronik Markt 2017 mit Lichtblicken

    Nach einem negativen ersten Halbjahr zeigte sich der Multimedia Markt Schweiz seit Juli 2017 etwas versöhnlicher - die darauffolgenden Monate lagen alle über Vorjahr.
    • 23/08/17
    • Press
    • Technology
    • Point of Sales Tracking
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Switzerland
    • German

    Multimediahandel meldet Rekordtief

    Der Rückgang im Schweizer Multimediahandel geht weiter. Das Marktvolumen nahm in den vergangenen zehn Jahren um fast ein Drittel ab. Luca Giuriato, Senior Market Consultant bei GfK Switzerland, schreibt über die Gründe für die Talfahrt.
    • 04/12/19
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global
    • English

    What does the future of Millennials look like?

    As the oldest members of this oft-discussed group prepare to turn 40, the future of Millennials will have a significant impact on the global marketplace. Although they haven’t suffered from a lack of media attention in the past decade, Millennials are worth another look simply because of their significant impact on the future. For example, they are currently overtaking Baby Boomers as the largest adult generation and approaching their Boomer parents in their share of the US electorate heading into the 2020 Presidential election. And in the past few years, they surpassed Generation X as the largest generation in the workforce. Millennials may also be the first truly global generation. Technology has broken down geographic boundaries, and these young adults are the product of not just their native cultures, but the tumultuous time during which they came of age. A second look at Millennials uncovers three key lessons that will be essential for engaging with them meaningfully in the future.

    Future of Millennials as parents

    Millennials are now the focal points of families and leading households that look quite different than those headed by previous generations. For example, GfK Consumer Life research shows that Millennials today are about as likely to be parents, but less likely to be married, when compared with Gen Xers at the same age in 2003. With Millennials leading more non-traditional households (e.g., single parents, unmarried couples), messaging needs to evolve to encompass these different types of families. Even more interesting is the marked difference in the way that Millennial moms and dads approach parenting today. In contrast to the Boomer tendency to raise “latch-key kids,” and Gen X’s “helicopter” parenting approach, Millennials have their own unique take on the parent-child relationship. Research from GfK Consumer Life shows that they reject “over-scheduling” by reducing the amount of time their children spend on extracurricular activities, are more liberal when it comes to limits on a child’s technology and media exposure, and are eager to spend more time with their kids on a variety of activities, from video and board games to shopping and exercising. With less of a strict dividing line between parent and child preferences across categories like media, entertainment, and health, brands can rethink how their offerings are classified and marketed; they can also create more opportunities & platforms for parents and kids to interact.

    Financial future of Millennials

    Coming of age during the Great Recession left many Millennials with low incomes and record levels of student debt. In fact, the typical Millennial’s net worth is 40% lower than that of Gen Xers in 2001, and 20% below what Boomers experienced in 1989. What’s more, significant financial polarization exists within the Millennial group: income gaps by levels of education are significantly wider than those of previous generations, and the change in net worth among young adults over time has declined among unmarried Millennials while rising among those who are married. And while many did receive financial help from their parents during tough times, many Millennials actually have been playing the caregiver role with their own mothers and fathers. With many forecasting that a possible recession in 2020 will again hit Millennials the hardest, brands need to adapt pricing, marketing, and merchandising to reflect a challenging and more diverse economic reality. Financial stress is just one of the reasons that Millennials have come to be known as the “burnout generation.” This segment—particularly those who are also parents—tends to lead on many indicators of modern-day “hustle culture” tracked by GfK Consumer Life. For example, they are very likely to report high stress levels and more likely than average to admit that they work most weekends and are often so busy, they can’t finish everything they need to do in a day. They’re not “lazy,” they’re simply exhausted – and it’s likely that shaky job security and major financial commitments are partially driving this mindset. This tendency to “hustle” is not unique to Millennials in the US – members of this generation index higher than average on aspirational values such as social recognition and status across all regions of the world. But while Millennials tend to lead on many of these attitudes, they aren’t the only generation suffering from burnout; recent studies of Generation Z (the generation following Millennials) show record-high stress levels among this emerging segment as well.

    Fun is still a priority for the future

    Despite their stress – financial and otherwise – Millennials have not yet outgrown the focus that has long distinguished them from other cohorts: their desire to have a good time. GfK Consumer Life research finds that personal values such as enjoying life, excitement, and having fun are still prioritized more highly among this generation than older age groups. Millennials’ signature optimism hasn’t taken too hard of a hit, either: they report high levels of confidence about their own immediate futures, as well as the lives their children will lead as adults; this mindset is consistently higher than average on a global level as well as in the US. Further, Millennials are more likely than average to seek novelty and fun in everyday products. Appealing to Millennials’ pleasure-seeking tendencies, and giving them enjoyable outlets in their daily lives, will inspire brand loyalty.

    What can brands do in order to keep up with these shifts in Millennials?

    In just a few decades of life, Millennials have experienced significant social, political, and economic upheavals, many of which have had a long-lasting impact on their lifestyles today and prospects for the future. As they enter the “middle era” of their lives with different approaches than their predecessors, brands will be wise to understand that:
      • The economic instability that has defined, and will continue to impact, this generation gives brands the opportunity to offer health innovations to relieve Millennials of their financial stress
      • Millennial parents enjoy a closer bond with their children compared to their predecessors; communicate to the entire family, not just the parent or the child
      • The future of Millennials still needs to include fun – give them opportunities to enjoy life!

    Get updates on consumer trends & insights

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    • 13/11/19
    • Retail
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • TEMAX
    • Global
    • English

    4 facts you can’t ignore about Black Friday

    Seasonal promotions are one of the core reasons consumers make a purchase. The importance of good deals to consumers can be clearly seen in GfK’s weekly long-term sales trends for Technical Consumer Goods. GfK has found that about a quarter of cumulative global sales come from select promotional events that only take place during 10 weeks of the year. Of course, there are regional differences, but Christmas, Singles’ Day and Black Friday dominate the promotional calendar in many countries around the world.

    1. Black Friday 2019 is timed perfectly

    Every year, Black Friday falls on the Friday after Thanksgiving in the US, which is celebrated on the fourth Thursday of November. This year’s Black Friday takes place on the latest possible date, 29th of November: right after payday and only three weeks before Christmas. As a result, many consumers will already feel the pressure to buy gifts and, probably more importantly, will have money to spend on Black Friday deals. For some shoppers, this might be the first time that they can go bargain hunting without having to organize a loan before making their purchase. This year’s Black Friday could well set new sales records thanks to its timing.

    2. Black Friday is bigger than Christmas

    Traditionally, the Friday after Thanksgiving has been regarded as the beginning of the United States’ Christmas shopping season. Today, both in volume and value, Black Friday is bigger than the original peak trading periods including Christmas and the January sales – and it continues to grow. Our Weekly Point of Sales Tracking shows that Black Friday week in 2018 generated more than double the turnover (+113%) of an average selling week across the EU5 (France, Germany, Italy Spain, UK) markets. For those countries plus Brazil, Black Friday is the most important week of the year in terms of sales value generated. Latin America has seen unprecedented peak sales during Black Friday.

    3. Black Friday attracts aspirational bargain hunters

    In general, consumers love bargains and they are actively looking for them. shows that with the ease of making price comparisons online, a growing number of consumers shop around before making a purchase decision. Globally, nearly half of all consumers (44%) have increased the frequency they compare prices from different stores. This is true for 58% of shoppers in Latam, 45% in Europe, 41% in APAC and 35% in North America.  And this is what makes Black Friday so successful and important – but retailers need to make sure the price drops are genuine in this environment of comparing prices. And our research shows that a significant proportion of shopping decisions might be driven by consumers wanting to treat themselves. A growing number of shoppers state that they want to “indulge or pamper themselves on a regular basis” or that they “prefer to own fewer, but higher quality items” or they “only buy from trusted brands”. These types of shopper attitudes give an indication of what aspirational bargain hunters could be looking for on Black Friday.

    4. It’s happening – so don’t fight it

    Black Friday has become an essential part of the annual retail calendar for deal-loving shoppers. So for retailers, it’s a question of “do or die”. To “do” it successfully, it’s important to understand the nuances of purchase behavior and shoppers’ attitudes. To make this key event in the “golden” quarter of the year deliver for your business, manufacturers and retailers alike need accurate weekly point of sale data to evaluate performance and plan tactics. In today’s competitive retail environment, it’s vital to respond quickly to consumer purchase behavior and competitor offers. And in the more mature markets, we’re seeing a trend in retailers and manufacturers finding new strategic answers on their quest to make Black Friday profitable despite the challenge of meeting consumers’ demand for bigger and better bargains. This trend is called “Premiumization” and it could transform Singles’ Day, Christmas and the rest of the 2019 shopping season.

    Can “Premiumization” save shopping season 2019?

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