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Market Opportunities and Innovation image

市场机遇与创新

品牌正面临着压力,需要在竞争日益激烈的市场环境中保持实效性。市场营销者应知道何时、何地以及如何提供能够为消费者和品牌创造附加价值的魅力体验,这一点显得至关重要。

发掘市场创新机会意味着能在竞争性趋势及市场影响力和不断变化的消费者需求之间获得准确的平衡。成功的品牌应掌握如何使新产品或服务与消费者的生活紧密联系。 

GfK设计研发的新情感体验,通过预期潜在需求使品牌保持新颖度和实效性。从发展规划到产品发布预测,我们在您的创新之旅中为您提供指导。核心的交付成果包括引人注目的新体验项目体系,这经过所有相关市场标准的验证;以及一项可行性启动计划,说明何时如何赢得胜利。

案例分享
  • Commercial assessment of a new immunotherapy

    Commercial assessment of a new immunotherapy

    21.09.2016

    We conducted secondary research to explore the current sepsis market and the current and future competitive landscape.

    Situation

    As part of due diligence on a potential in-licensing target, we were asked to provide an independent expert view on the commercial potential for an innovative treatment for severe sepsis.

    This required us to:

    • assess the size of the targeted severe sepsis population, diagnosis and treatment rate
    • understand the current treatment patterns, unmet needs and expectations and opportunities for new treatments
    • review the current and future competitive landscape
    • test potential target product profiles
    • develop potential pricing, access and uptake scenarios for the different target product profiles(TPPs)
    • establish revenue potential based on the different scenarios
    • highlight the critical success factors and risks

    The geographic scope included France, Germany, Italy, Spain, the UK, the US and Japan.

    Approach

    We conducted secondary research to explore the current sepsis market and the current and future competitive landscape. We then undertook primary research with payers and key opinion leaders to address any gaps in our research, to test potential TPPs and to gain external validation on potential pricing, access and uptake scenarios.

    Outcome

    We delivered our top-line findings on the critical areas for commercial success in an executive presentation. In addition, we supplied a detailed report of the research findings, including feedbackabout the actions the client should take to maximize the commercial potential of the asset.

    Click here to download our success story

    Timothy A J Fitzgerald
  • Driving informed investment decisions for a new treatment

    Driving informed investment decisions for a new treatment

    21.09.2016

    We collected extensive information on disease prevalence, diagnosis and treatment guidelines and the pricing and reimbursement landscape through desk research in the EU5

    Situation

    Before taking an in-licensing decision for a new drug targeting primary biliary cirrhosis and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, our client wanted to assess the commercial opportunity for the treatment. This required us to:

    • assess the size of the target population, the competitive landscape and the target product profile
    • evaluate the willingness to pay for new treatments, potential price opportunity, diagnosis and treatment rates, target treatment population size and likely market share
    • obtain actionable recommendations and a revenue forecast model to inform its decision

    Approach

    We collected extensive information on disease prevalence, diagnosis and treatment guidelines and the pricing and reimbursement landscape through desk research in the EU5 (France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the UK) and the USA.

    Then, we used this information to develop primary research materials, including prereading material and a discussion guide and subsequently interviewed key opinion leaders, physicians and payers in the scope markets.

    Finally, we built a forecast model based on realistic assumptions of market performance.

    Outcome

    Our final forecast model and report covered multiple scenarios for the drug we assessed.
    This enabled our client to make an informed investment decision.

    Click here to download our success story

    Timothy A J Fitzgerald
  • Simulating the future market for inflammatory disease biosimilars

    Simulating the future market for inflammatory disease biosimilars

    21.09.2016

    Our client wanted to help affiliates in eight countries to better understand the threats and opportunities this evolving competitive landscape will bring in the years ahead.

    Situation

    Two opposing forces are shaping drug prices in the inflammatory disease market: the downwards pressure from biosimilars and upwards pricing aspirations of bio-betters. Our client wanted to help affiliates in eight countries to better understand the threats and opportunities this evolving competitive landscape will bring in the years ahead.

    Approach

    We designed, planned and facilitated a series of country-specific, interactive war games tosimulate the evolution of the inflammatory disease market landscape over several cycles.

    These sessions helped to increase awareness and deliver insights to the pharma company’s affiliates in the UK, Germany, Italy, Spain, Netherlands, Sweden, Norway and Denmark. We also identified strategies and tactics, including risk mitigation, to maximizecommercial success in the target markets.

    Outcome

    We delivered country-specific reports to our client’s affiliate teams to help them understand how pricing and market dynamics are likely to evolve in the years ahead. In addition, we synthesized the lessons from each war game into a Europe-wide learning package.

    Our client now has a consolidated set of learnings that are helping them validate the opportunities for, and threats to, their European strategy.

    Click here to download our success story

    Timothy A J Fitzgerald
  • Adding value to anti-aging haircare market

    Adding value to anti-aging haircare market

    28.06.2016

    We helped a beauty company in Japan identify innovation opportunities in the haircare market.

    Situation

    Our client wanted to uncover new opportunities in the market for anti-aging haircare products for women.

    Approach

    We conducted seven focus groups with six respondents and follow-up online interviews with 19 respondents. This gave us a wealth of qualitative information about women’s fears about aging, their concerns about anti-aging haircare products and their interest inproducts that can help them delay visible signs of aging. For insight into the emerging trends affecting consumers, we also examined the latest developments in the haircare market as well as in anti-aging product segments such as vitamins, functional foods and drinks, and fitness products. We used our predictive benefit framework to segment the features and benefits consumers sought from anti-aging hair products. Based on these insights, we recommended ways the client could develop innovative products.

    Outcome

    We identified a range of emerging benefit areas where our client would be able to define white spaces for innovation. We revealed an array of “tipping points” where the beauty company could deliver new anti-aging hair concepts to the market that would set it apart from the competition.

    Click here to download our success story (short version)

    Click here to download our success story (long version)

研究洞察

Here you can find the latest insights for Market Opportunities and Innovation. View all insights

    • 06/18/14
    • Financial Services
    • Health
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Automotive
    • Consumer Goods
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • China
    • Chinese

    GfK 推出创新管理解决方案以支持商业化和市场发布

    GfK 今日宣布推出一项创新管理解决方案GfK MarketBuilder,能够有效推进新产品及服务成功地实现商业化和市场发布。
    • 02/26/14
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • China
    • Chinese

    GfK发布旨在发掘、评估和排序绝佳市场机遇的战略方案

    GfK今日发布一项独特的战略解决方案GfK FutureScape,用于发掘和评估市场中的一系列潜在发展空间,掌握最佳机遇,利用市场细分确定价值最高的目标消费群体。
    • 11/30/16
    • Public Services
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global Study
    • Global
    • English

    Generosity lives: Four in ten people help others a minimum of once a month

    Mexico, USA and Netherlands lead for populations who help others a minimum of once a month. Men slightly ahead of women overall, while 20-29 year olds lead across age groups.
    • 11/28/16
    • Technology
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Global
    • English

    The paradox of innovation in the tech sector

    Tech companies are constantly releasing their latest product “innovations” as they attempt to find the growth that the sector craves. From new versions of tablets and smartphones to kitchen appliances, these aren’t the game-changing innovations that will halt market stagnation and prevent decline. Where is the growth in the tech sector going to come from?

    Innovation is the route to growth

    Innovation, in the true sense of the word, means finding new and different ways to solve customers’ problems. Genuine growth in the technology sector can only be achieved this way. If the prevailing approach of evolution rather than revolution persists, many of the companies that are around today will no longer exist in the next ten years. It’s not just me who thinks this. John Chambers, former CEO of CISCO, agrees: “If you don’t reinvent yourself; change your organization structure; if you don’t talk about speed of innovation, you’re going to get disrupted. And it’ll be a brutal disruption – the majority of companies will not exist in a meaningful way in 10 to 15 years from now.” Technology is a competitive and disruptive industry. We’ve seen startups with the backing and funds threaten established players with ground-breaking innovations that change consumers’ lives for the better. They are meeting a need. Today’s Connected Consumers and B2B customers are more demanding, better educated and less forgiving than ever before. They’re hungry for genuinely new technology. And they are increasingly adept at identifying – and ignoring – slightly updated versions of technology they already have. This approach simply can’t generate the kind of sustainable growth that technology companies all over the world are trying to achieve. Put simply, product innovation is getting harder in this sector.

    Innovate through the consumer, not the technology

    So how exactly do you go about being innovative? The most important requirement arguably is to let go of the obsession with the product. For the longer you focus on the technology, the less likely you are to invent something that is genuinely innovative. The real route to innovation lies with the end customer. It is only by focusing on your target audience – whether domestic or business – that you will be able to create technology that is genuinely new, necessary, relevant and desirable. We’re not just considering product innovation in this discussion. It’s worth remembering that innovation comes in many forms. You can innovate the experience, position or re-position a brand, optimize existing portfolios and invent new brand strategies, identify and target new markets, business models, channels and customers.

    Three key elements to successful innovation

    I believe there are three key elements to successful innovation:
    • First, you need a deep understanding of the end customer and the evolving market landscape. You need to be able to cut through the noise to capture where your potential customers and the market are heading.
    • Second, you need to craft meaningful and relevant propositions that resonate with buyers within your segment. Even the most original idea won’t succeed if it doesn’t meet a genuine need.
    • Third, you need to bring your proposition to life using “experience design”. Be sure to create a meaningful and memorable experience for customers.

    Think like your end customer

    Whether it’s for consumers or businesses, how you communicate your innovation is crucial. You must anticipate the different factors that enable adoption. An emotional connection with your innovation is every bit as important as the product itself, perhaps even more so. Get this right and you’ll have the “eureka” moment you’ve been waiting for. Get it wrong and your latest innovation won’t make it further than the early adopters and a review in the specialist press. If there’s one thing that I would like the technology industry to remember it is this: customers, customers, customers. Whether you target the B2C or B2B market, if we’re more passionate about the technology than we are about the end users who will – or won’t – use it, then John Chambers’ doom-laden prediction may come true. I am more optimistic. I believe that together we can create the radical departures needed to reinvigorate the global technology sector. We can find genuine innovation that will lead to the growth we yearn for. But only if we can put the end customer – not the technology – at the heart of the creative process. Karl Pfister-Kraxner is the Global Head of Technology at GfK. For more information or to share your thoughts, please email karl.pfister@gfk.com.
GfK研究人员