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Media Measurement

Consumers have more media content, channels and more choice of devices than ever before.

Advertisers, media owners and media buyers need to identify which digital and traditional channels are most successful at attracting the right audiences.

Our audience measurement solution is the trading currency for television (e.g. TV ratings), print, radio, out-of-home, online and mobile media. We track which consumers are using what channel, how they are engaging with content across each medium and what is driving their behavior.

With this detailed view of consumers’ content appreciation our clients not only get ratings of what people are watching or listening to – they also know why. Our cross-media measurement shows what devices your audiences are using for each channel and type of content, and we evaluate your marketing efficiency and performance across the whole spectrum of channels.

We help you optimize your channel selection and content to deliver increased audience engagement, end-to-end.

Read more about Media Measurement

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Success Stories
  • Connecting the dots between digital and traditional media

    Connecting the dots between digital and traditional media

    15.03.2016

    We investigated the role of social media chatter in generating awareness and readership of Vanity Fair’s Caitlyn Jenner issue.

    Vanity Fair is an influential and iconic magazine published by Condé Nast.

    Situation

    Most media planners crave insight and data about how digital and traditional media can work together. The much talked about issue with Caitlyn Jenner on the cover offered us a perfect opportunity to explore this topic. We wanted to investigate what impact, if any, the social media buzz can have on the readership of the July issue in its traditional printed format.

    Approach

    Over a nine-week period, we surveyed 1,798 adults online who said they had read the July issue of Vanity Fair.

    Outcome

    • Four in ten adults who read the magazine first heard about the Jenner cover on social media
    • 40% of adults (ages 18+) who read the July issue had not read Vanity Fair in the previous 12 months
    • Nearly half (47%) of those readers were aged 18 and 34, indicating that the coveted millennials do read print magazines, contrary to the conventional wisdom
    • The big challenge for publishers is generating awareness among these younger readers – and it looks like social media can help with this

    Click here to download the success story

  • Optimizing TV content for a demanding audience

    Optimizing TV content for a demanding audience

    31.01.2016

    Our research helped this TV network shape its new television show featuring a Brazilian icon.

    Situation

    A broadcaster needed information about how viewers would respond to a popular entertainer’s return to the airwaves after a short absence. After the launch of the program, the company wanted to track the audience’s response to its format and content.

    Approach

    We explored social media conversations to determine which elements viewers might value in the show, and how these aligned with the host and the network. A subsequent quantitative study gauged the target audience’s intention of watching the program.

    After the launch, we tracked viewers’ behavior and opinions by integrating social media insights with audience data from the broadcaster and data from our online panel.

    Outcome

    We found that Brazilians were receptive to a new show because television program options during the evening time slot were limited.

    After the launch, we tracked user-generated content on social networks to see what elements of the show were resonating with the audience. This information helped producers strengthen the show’s content.

    Our advice also helped the commercial team to target sponsors with brands that would be a good match for the profile of the program and its audience.

    Click here to download our success story (short version)

    Click here to download our success story (long version)

     

     

Latest insights

Here you can find the latest insights for Media Measurement. View all insights

    • 07/05/17
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    NOM and GfK to deliver total readership of print brands in the Netherlands

    NOM has commissioned GfK to integrate their print currency for newspaper and magazine brand consumption with NOBO online published media brand consumption data. This will deliver insights into the total readership of the brand across all platforms in the Netherlands. 
    • 06/07/17
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Connecting with the “connected” TV audience

    With whom, what and how are you “connected” when you watch TV? Gone are the days that TV is a device you switch on to see what is being broadcast. For decades, we were also watching self-recorded content, and today there is an avalanche of online digital video allowing us to view whatever we want, whenever we want. Of the time spent watching video content, 35% is watched on TV live (broadcast as scheduled), 15% time shifted, 21% on demand or broadcaster catch up and 29% from an online website or streamed from an app (UK online adults, GfK Viewscape 2016). And we increasingly consume video on other devices: of all viewing time 65% is watched on a TV set, 20% on a PC/laptop, 7% from a tablet and 8% from a smart phone (UK online adults, GfK Viewscape 2016). Digital video is here to stay and the TV audience is embracing both traditional and new forms of content delivery.

    Just what is a “connected” TV audience?

    These new forms of viewing video are sometimes described as ”connected”. Does that mean that viewers watching traditional broadcast TV are “unconnected”? When I watch television, I am extremely connected, regardless of the source of the content. Once I have found the program I want to watch, I am intensely connected with the story and the characters. I am also connected with my comfortable chair. I occasionally glance on my mobile phone or in the fridge, but these are rare distractions from the big screen. For me TV is like an interactive version of cinema where I focus on the content I have chosen to see and forget about the rest of the world. Why call viewers “connected” based on the source of their content? Does it matter if we watch in a linear or non-linear way? Or does “connected” refer to us as social beings, how we connect to others?

    Understanding the connection with the content

    Some viewers tweet posts about what they watch and update their online profile to let others share in what they are viewing. Personally, I regard this as a waste of time. I might be connected with people in the room while I’m watching TV, but I am not interested in connecting with other viewers online to exchange comments on that program. I prefer to watch TV uninterrupted and unconnected. When watching TV, we create very direct and intimate relationships with the content. I can be absorbed by it, emotionally touched, informed or I simply have a good time. Sometimes I am disappointed, angry or upset. Call me old fashioned. All this happens (offline and online) in my living room, where I am cocooned in the program. The next day I might share my opinion with others, but through my viewing behavior I leave very little traces a broadcaster could scrape off the web. Maybe the distinction between connected and unconnected does not reflect how a TV audience is related to TV content. But “connection” is a key description to understand viewers and their needs. How can broadcasters and other content providers connect with viewers? How can they keep track of what content people feel connected to and what content they would prefer to avoid next time? Sure, broadcasters have access to daily ratings to see the number of viewers, but that does not measure the wants and needs of their audience.

    Content Appreciation

    To connect with a TV audience through research, you need to select a representative group of viewers. You should contact them in the proper way, ask the right questions, and listen carefully to their motivations and reactions. We have set up a system to do so. On an average day, more than 18,000 viewers in the UK, Russia, Ireland, the Netherlands and Flanders combined, tell us what they thought of all the programs they saw the day before. This means one day after the audience ratings are available, you receive the full profiles of what dramas were most entertaining, what news programs viewers felt provided the best information, and what chat shows had the best guests. You know what programs were most talked about. You see unfiltered comments on what the viewers actually thought of all the programs they watched. Using our dashboard, you can benchmark your own content against a relevant selection of your competition. We call this ”Content Appreciation” and we think it is the best solution for broadcasters to connect with their audience. hbspt.cta.load(2405078, 'c67ebd12-0b49-4cfd-887b-b1a892698de5', {});
    • 06/02/17
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Advertising
    • TV Audience Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    MMS and GfK close-in on Total Video Ratings Currency in Sweden

    MMS – which measures the moving image in Sweden – has released its digital ad ratings service. The service covers video advertisements on broadcasters’ websites and apps viewed across PC, smartphone, tablet and smart TV. It is built upon GfK’s data integration and data science capabilities that fuse MMS’s multi-source data streams into actionable currency.
    • 05/19/17
    • Automotive
    • Media Measurement
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Mobile is the means to improving traction for your crossmedia automotive campaigns

    As an automotive marketer, you face a great many challenges. Not only is the auto industry in the fast lane when it comes to change, but so too is the media landscape you must navigate to attract Connected Consumers. Online media’s increasing importance in the purchase journey combined with the proliferation of connected devices, however, presents a significant opportunity and route to maximizing the efficiency of your campaigns. While traditional TV remains the go-to media channel to drive brand image and reach a mass audience, online campaigns can add extra reach and help target a specific group. More specifically, you need to go mobile and devise content specifically for this channel. Here’s why:

    Go mobile to get more mileage from your campaigns

    Our research shows that mobile accounts for a significant share of digital ad impressions. According to our Crossmedia Visualizer data, based on online users in Germany, more than one third (37.4%) of all ad impressions within automotive online touchpoints occur exclusively on mobile devices. When looking at smartphones only, they deliver 20.4% exclusive reach, while tablets deliver 14.3%. Mobile use is even more pronounced among Gen Y (20-34 year olds) in this market, where 45.3% of impressions in the automotive category are exclusively on mobile. What’s more, our research shows that the reach of Facebook on mobile devices among younger target age groups is nearly three times higher than that of desktop ad placements. Also when run in addition to TV campaigns, paid placements on Facebook can extend incremental reach by 4.5%. This is even before considering the viral effects a campaign can have. Younger age groups are not only critical for brand building but are also, because of their affinity for using mobile and social media, open to campaigns that use these channels. What this means is that if you aren’t reaching them on mobile and via social media through paid placements and the like, your competitors surely will.

    Fine-tune your use of mobile channels for incremental reach and targeting

    The increasing usage of mobile devices among the online population in the auto sector is also evident when we look at the websites of the top three premium car brands in Germany. While desktop still delivers the greatest share of impressions versus mobile for Mercedes-Benz (64.3% vs. 35.8%) and Audi (64.3% vs. 32.2%), for BMW, mobile provides a 53.3% share of impressions versus 45.9% for desktop. These factors combine to underline the need to optimize the mobile elements of your cross-media campaigns to target today’s – and tomorrow’s – Connected Consumers where they are. Put another way, if you want to get the mileage from your cross-media campaigns, you need to fine-tune your use of mobile channels to deliver that all-important incremental reach and targeting of content. You can master today’s multi-channel marketing reality and track, analyze and optimize your media planning with our Crossmedia Visualizer tool. Test it out for yourself for free to discover:
    • which car brand sites have the highest net reach among the online population in Germany and how this has changed over last five months
    • which of the key online auto sites in Germany has the highest net reach and number of unique users
    • what the top auto sites’ reach is by device and which site indexes highest for reaching those who intend to buy a new car (timeframe)
    • and more…
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