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Smart insights: Media and Entertainment

The media and entertainment industry is experiencing rapid transformation. This offers significant opportunities for those broadcasters, publishers, content advertising agencies, and content and digital platform owners who can understand the impact of this change.

Today, an audience of many is becoming an audience of one, forcing the media industry to become more data-driven. Media and digital groups need to understand changing patterns of consumption, including what programs and content are viewed across digital and traditional channels, as well as other content sources. 

Our media and entertainment research experts provide insight into what content is being consumed on which channels and devices, and why. We convert big cross-media data into smart, relevant research insights by using our unrivaled analytical, data science and technological expertise to integrate and interpret multiple data sets.

GfK’s own unique data sets include proprietary audience, consumer and retail data (for example Video on Demand (VOD), DVDs, music, books, video games and consoles). This allows us to measure media consumption, advertising efficiency and content appeal. By capturing, analyzing and translating media consumption across channels, platforms and devices, we help you build and execute winning business strategies.

Success Stories
  • Providing comprehensive product information for a hi-fi publication

    Providing comprehensive product information for a hi-fi publication

    16.08.2016

    Our catalog enables our client to offer comprehensive and authoritative product listings through its online publications.

    Situation

    Our client publishes a magazine for buyers and lovers of home audiovisual systems. In its move toward digital publishing, it wanted to keep its website readers engaged by providing technical specifications for most products in its listings. The company also wanted to minimize the costs and resources required to gather and manage the content, preferring that its staff focus on core publishing activities.

    Approach

    We provided the magazine with a subscription to our authoritative product catalog data. This gives the organization detailed, accurate and standardized technical specifications, product images and marketing text covering most audiovisual products in the market. Our product data is updated daily and is built on data drawn directly from manufacturers and distributors.

    Outcome

    The publication now offers its readers up-to-date, accurate and detailed product information alongside its editorial reviews. This adds value for readers and entrenches the publication’s place as the most comprehensive source of information about home entertainment systems.

    Our catalog:

    • allows the client to easily offer product listings without the costs of capturing the data manually
    • enables the publisher to focus on its core business even as it builds out new online services for its readers
    • offers data even for niche brands and manufacturers

    Click here to download our success story

  • Cross-device usage study optimizes campaign planning

    Cross-device usage study optimizes campaign planning

    02.06.2016

    Facebook asked us to explore how consumers use computing devices and how they switch between them for different tasks during the day.

    Facebook’s mission is to give people the power to share and make the world more open and connected.

    Situation

    Facebook wanted to explore how people use different devices for different tasks during the day and how they switch between them. This information could help its advertisers target customers with greater precision.

    Approach

    We combined a quantitative online survey with qualitative in-depth analysis to understand consumers’ behavior, attitudes and opinions about the devices they use to access online content and services. We used geographical location tracking to analyze which activities they were most likely to do while away from their homes.

    Outcome

    We discovered that almost half of the adults in the UK and the US sometimes begin an activity on one device and finish it on another. This suggests that marketers must reach their audiences across all platforms with a consistent brand experience. With single log-in sites like Facebook, they can avoid sending the same messages to prospective customers on their different devices.

    The research highlighted the most important reasons for people switching from one device to another: comfort and convenience; urgency; the time it takes to complete a task; security and privacy; and the complexity of the information the user needs to input to complete the task. Actions associated with a purchase journey frequently trigger a consumer’s decision to switch devices.

    Click here to download our success story (short version)

    Click here to download our success story (long version)

    GfK DMI team
  • Connecting the dots between digital and traditional media

    Connecting the dots between digital and traditional media

    15.03.2016

    We investigated the role of social media chatter in generating awareness and readership of Vanity Fair’s Caitlyn Jenner issue.

    Vanity Fair is an influential and iconic magazine published by Condé Nast.

    Situation

    Most media planners crave insight and data about how digital and traditional media can work together. The much talked about issue with Caitlyn Jenner on the cover offered us a perfect opportunity to explore this topic. We wanted to investigate what impact, if any, the social media buzz can have on the readership of the July issue in its traditional printed format.

    Approach

    Over a nine-week period, we surveyed 1,798 adults online who said they had read the July issue of Vanity Fair.

    Outcome

    • Four in ten adults who read the magazine first heard about the Jenner cover on social media
    • 40% of adults (ages 18+) who read the July issue had not read Vanity Fair in the previous 12 months
    • Nearly half (47%) of those readers were aged 18 and 34, indicating that the coveted millennials do read print magazines, contrary to the conventional wisdom
    • The big challenge for publishers is generating awareness among these younger readers – and it looks like social media can help with this

    Click here to download the success story

  • Optimizing TV content for a demanding audience

    Optimizing TV content for a demanding audience

    31.01.2016

    Our research helped this TV network shape its new television show featuring a Brazilian icon.

    Situation

    A broadcaster needed information about how viewers would respond to a popular entertainer’s return to the airwaves after a short absence. After the launch of the program, the company wanted to track the audience’s response to its format and content.

    Approach

    We explored social media conversations to determine which elements viewers might value in the show, and how these aligned with the host and the network. A subsequent quantitative study gauged the target audience’s intention of watching the program.

    After the launch, we tracked viewers’ behavior and opinions by integrating social media insights with audience data from the broadcaster and data from our online panel.

    Outcome

    We found that Brazilians were receptive to a new show because television program options during the evening time slot were limited.

    After the launch, we tracked user-generated content on social networks to see what elements of the show were resonating with the audience. This information helped producers strengthen the show’s content.

    Our advice also helped the commercial team to target sponsors with brands that would be a good match for the profile of the program and its audience.

    Click here to download our success story (short version)

    Click here to download our success story (long version)

     

     

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Latest insights

Here you can find the latest insights for media and entertainment industry. View all insights

    • 05/09/17
    • Press
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Global
    • English

    GfK and Eyeota consumer purchasing-power retail data available to advertisers across Europe

    “Retail Purchasing Power” and “Purchasing Power for Retail Product Lines” improve the accuracy of targeting consumers online according to their offline shopping habits.
    • 05/03/17
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Retail
    • Global
    • English

    Valuing experiences over ‘stuff’: How consumers are shaping retail and media

    Whether we are talking shopping, viewing content, traveling or just casually socializing with friends, experience takes center stage for today’s consumers. The reason for this is that experiences are the modern world’s social currency, so the more we fight for them the better we can market ourselves to others. And the more experiences we gather, the better individuals we become, a truth that touches a nerve across age groups and generations, but more so for the up-to-35 year olds, Millennials or just a good mix of Gen Y and Z.

    Focusing on experience in a technologically evolving environment

    Rapid technological changes have impacted the way consumers perform everyday tasks. Internet enabled smart phones and tablets have placed the power in the consumers’ hands. Literally. For the last few years, online purchasing has been gaining a lot of momentum, beating the lines, registers and check outs of brick-and-mortar stores. The advancements of app shopping technology and the rise (until recently) of shopping loyalty were this trend’s enablers. But do consumers now want more? Whilst technology (ie. the internet) is used widely to search for information about a product, check online reviews, compare prices and check availability, experiencing the actual product/item is emerging as an intermediate step before the final purchase occurs. Think of a typical pre-Christmas shopping day. Consumers get experiences dosed up on atmosphere, lights and odors by visiting shops and malls whilst they are examining present options only to go back home and buy them online that same evening, often at a lower price. Now, this is no longer a behavior observed before the Festive season; technology ignited consumers combining seamless online and offline purchasing (and vice versa) is an everyday occurrence. The two channels have become completely intertwined in the consumer’s mind. Physical retail’s response was to embrace new ways to fuel the consumer’s imagination and please the senses while overcompensating for the digital medium’s inability to do so. As a result, stores are now becoming less about replenishment whilst focusing increasingly on experience rather than transactions.

    The ‘experience’ revolution’s effect on media and entertainment

    When it comes to experiencing content, shying away from physical purchases of DVDs and Blu-rays is nothing new. What’s more interesting is consumers’ muted response to downloading content. Most recently, consumers spoke loudly by remaining unexcited about Netflix’s newly introduced downloading option – only 3% of its subscribers have downloaded content since its launch back in November last year. (© GfK 2017 SVOD Content Consumption Tracker). Owning content, even if it’s just digitally, comes with the headache of storing and is missing out on ‘the thrill of the moment’ experience, which comes to life when deciding what to stream and how much of it. Streaming revolutionized the means to watch content and gave birth to a whole new viewing experience: binge-viewing.

    The binge-viewing phenomenon

    Two decades ago, back-to-back episodes of our favorite series was more than enough for a series enthusiast to make an appointment to view and turn the evening into a social event. The much cooler version of this, which gives full control over to the viewer about ‘what, when & how much’, is the binge-viewing phenomenon. ‘I stayed up all night to catch up on X’ is now a viewing treat even for the younger Gen Xs (around 40), who (via the delights of streaming) relive their student life instantanés. The evolution of our viewing experience re-shaped the watercooler moments in the office, which have been replaced with questions such as: “how far along are you?”, whilst there is a certain pressure on viewers to have covered (or sampled at least) the most talked about shows. To finesse our newly experienced viewing addiction, content creators had to revisit their scripting techniques; drip-feeding thrill and suspense throughout all episodes rather than keeping cliffhangers for the end of a series. This new, far superior viewing experience has created monster consumers, who expect everything (all content) on anything (all platforms), leaving content providers scratching their heads on the new viable model. Far from implying that the streaming technology is directly linked to the death of physical media, it feels that the ease of streaming content legally (or illegally) has further downgraded the sense of ownership here with DVDs and Blu-rays gathering shelf dust and the odd video rental shop serving as a museum of the pre-digital era.

    Does the balance between experiences over ‘stuff’ shift when our home is the focus?

    Technology has exploded and even though consumers take notice, they are the ones who dictate the rhythm when it comes to adopting it. Especially when it comes to technology targeting their own home. Our homes may be increasingly seen as entertainment & hobby centers, but first and foremost, they remain our private retreats. Virtual Reality gadgets and Smart Home tech are promising even more elevated sensory experiences to the average consumer, however their appeal still remains quite niche, limiting their popularity to birthday presents for loved ones. Cost, security issues and data privacy concerns seem to counterbalance our urge to create edgy experiences in this instance. Instead, we are seeing a U-turn to simpler things and times, like the taking up of cross stitching or micro brewing by sub-groups of the younger generations, who perceive such hobbies as an antidote to fast technology. One thing is certain: The search for memorable experiences continues, not least because compared to possessions, these intangible, non-measurable moments generate a feeling of happiness that doesn’t evaporate. *This article was originally posted on TM Forum Live Mary Kyriakidi is the Director of Media & Entertainment at GfK. To share your thoughts, please email her at mary.kyriakidi@gfk.com or leave a comment below.
    • 04/06/17
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    Netflix now offers downloadable content to watch offline. So what?

    Netflix was the last to join the likes of Amazon Prime and catch-up services in offering its subscribers the flexibility to watch content offline. For a while, Netflix officials have been shutting down all downloading queries cold. Their decision to “focus on the 95% use case where customers watch movies when they have network access and not to focus on the 5% case of airplane use or watching movies in the backseat of your car,” quoting Gibson Biddle at the 2012 Stack Exchange, was followed through for many years. Then, as the company focused on growth outside the US, the offline mode was kind of a deal breaker to push subscription rates in emerging markets. In those countries, consumers had already adapted their behaviour to lower levels of broadband speeds and Wi-Fi access and a Netflix offering would have seemed incomplete or impractical without the option to download content.

    Downloading options introduced by Netflix

    So, as of the 30th November 2016, we got what we wished for; Netflix introduced downloading options for users worldwide, benefiting even us in the very much developed world in the UK. But have Netflix subscribers responded enthusiastically to the long-awaited downloading feature? Here are the facts:
    • The word has spread: the vast majority (63%) of Netflix subscribers are aware that downloading is now available
    • However, a mere 3% are using it
    • Of those who use it, two thirds do so a couple of times a month or less
    In essence, the download feature is rarely utilized by Netflix users, with the majority of content still being streamed directly. When watching a TV Series that has been downloaded, viewing is more likely to be just one episode, compared with if that content was streamed directly. ‘Binge watching’ is also less likely if content has been downloaded rather than streamed.

    Why aren’t users binge-watching downloadable content?

    ‘Binge-watching’- the high level control over what, when and for how long you watch a show (you just don’t dare the thought of stop watching) is a concept that seems to be losing its coolness if all is downloaded for convenience. When respondents were asked about the reasons they haven’t used this feature yet, the half-hearted ‘I view/stream all I want at home’ response ranked first (with 52% of Netflix subs agreeing). Technical barriers like ‘lack of storage space’ (27%) and ‘don’t know how’ (17%) were mentioned next, and finally 7% could not find content they wanted to download. For some, the downloading experience was restrictive, if not unpleasant: the unsuitability for desktop streamers, also for Android devices that don’t support HD officially, further technical barriers for Chromecast or AirPlay users, also limitations around the number of devices that can download at the same time, etc. (the list goes on) – all these combined with an incomplete downloading library and the enthusiasm fades away quickly.

    Netflix = streaming

    This is consistent with how users are using Amazon’s downloading option too, averaging at an unchanged 5% since launch. In essence, a download sweeps away the beauty of the ‘caught in the moment’, unplanned viewing experience and is reduced to a practicality function. So, thank you Netflix for the ‘nice to have’ perk; it’s got to be there even if hardly ever used; for peace of mind, planes and dodgy Wi-Fi service at hotels. Whilst acknowledging the ever changing video landscape, I would be really surprised if Netflix’s downloading usage presents an uptake over the next few quarter results of our SVOD study. It’s only when post-Generation Z consumers start their own revolution on the way content gets consumed that we will be in for a surprise! Mary Kyriakidi is the Director of Media & Entertainment at GfK. To share your thoughts, please email her at mary.kyriakidi@gfk.com or leave a comment below.
    • 03/31/17
    • Press
    • Financial Services
    • Health
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Automotive
    • Consumer Goods
    • FMCG
    • Global
    • English

    UK Consumer Confidence stays at -6 in March

    GfK’s long-running Consumer Confidence Index remains stable at -6 in March.  Three of the five measures stayed at the same level and two measures saw increases.
Solutions
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    Brand and Customer Experience (BaCE)

    Brands are under pressure to develop emotional connections and relationships with consumers and business decision makers.  Brands need to respond in-the-moment, to enrich the customer experience – and develop strategies that influence ”moments of truth” throughout individual brand journeys.  

  • Consumer Panels

    Consumer Panels

    Your business is all about your consumers. So understanding them is essential in ensuring your products and services meet their needs, and in identifying opportunities for growth.

    Our international consumer panel data and research expertise provide you with smart customer insights into who your consumers are, their attitudes and behaviors, across channels.

  • Digital Market Intelligence (DMI)

    Digital Market Intelligence (DMI)

    When consumers shop, search, communicate, gather information and engage with companies or brands online, they behave differently depending on which device or screen they are using. They expect a consistent experience regardless of the channel or device they are using.

  • Geomarketing

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    Our geomarketing solutions and consultancy provide our clients with smart insights into location-specific factors that impact the success of business sites, shops, sales territories, target groups, as well as chain store and distribution networks.

  • Media Measurement

    Media Measurement

    Consumers have more media content, channels and more choice of devices than ever before.

    Advertisers, media owners and media buyers need to identify which digital and traditional channels are most successful at attracting the right audiences.

  • Point of Sales Tracking

    Point of Sales Tracking

    Retailers and manufacturers are under pressure to develop products and services that maximize sales and profit and to keep customers coming back.

    Success relies on having the most up-to-date sales data, combined with robust analysis to understand which products and services are performing well in the market – and which are not. With this information, clients can set clear strategies for commercial growth and increase return on investment.

  • Shopper

    Shopper

    Digital continues to open up new paths to purchase, changing how and where people shop. More and more data becomes available every day, as shoppers embrace multi-channel brand experiences.

    To stay competitive in this big data, multi-channel environment, businesses need to identify and leverage the most relevant data along the entire path to purchase. With this, companies can optimize each step of the shopper journey. 

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