Möchten Sie zur deutschen Seite wechseln?JaNeina
Close
Smart Automotive Insights image

Măsurarea şi interpretarea audienţelor

Consumatorii au la dispoziţie mai mult conţinut media, mai multe canale şi mai multe tipuri de dispozitive decât au avut vreodată până acum.

Agenţiile de publicitate sau de media și proprietarii media trebuie să identifice canalele digitale şi tradiţionale care au cel mai mare succes şi atrag categoriile cele mai relevante de public. 

Soluţia noastră de măsurare a audienţelor constituie "moneda de schimb" pentru televiziuni (audienţe TV), publicaţii tipărite, radio, outdoor, media online şi mobile. Monitorizăm ce canale sunt urmărite şi de către care categorii de consumatori; de asemenea, urmărim modul în care aceştia interacţionează cu conţinut pe fiecare dintre canale și ce anume le generează comportamente de achiziție.

Graţie acestor analize detaliate ale consumatorilor şi conţinuturilor, clienţii noştri nu vor obţine doar cifrele audienţelor, ci şi motivaţiile care stau în spatele acestor cifre. Măsurătorile noastre cross-media arată ce dispozitive utilizează publicul țintă pentru fiecare tip de canal şi pentru fiecare tip de conţinut. Apoi, pe baza acestor măsurători, evaluăm eficienţa și performanța activităților de marketingîn toate media.

Vă ajutăm să optimizaţi selecţia de canale şi conţinutul pentru a obţine un public mai fidel şi mai implicat.

Marius Amuraritei
Romania
004021205-5500
Noutăți

Găsiți cele mai noi date și interpretări pentru soluțiile de Măsurare şi interpretare a audienţelor. Vedeți toate informațiile

    • 06/07/17
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    Connecting with the “connected” TV audience

    With whom, what and how are you “connected” when you watch TV? Gone are the days that TV is a device you switch on to see what is being broadcast. For decades, we were also watching self-recorded content, and today there is an avalanche of online digital video allowing us to view whatever we want, whenever we want. Of the time spent watching video content, 35% is watched on TV live (broadcast as scheduled), 15% time shifted, 21% on demand or broadcaster catch up and 29% from an online website or streamed from an app (UK online adults, GfK Viewscape 2016). And we increasingly consume video on other devices: of all viewing time 65% is watched on a TV set, 20% on a PC/laptop, 7% from a tablet and 8% from a smart phone (UK online adults, GfK Viewscape 2016). Digital video is here to stay and the TV audience is embracing both traditional and new forms of content delivery.

    Just what is a “connected” TV audience?

    These new forms of viewing video are sometimes described as ”connected”. Does that mean that viewers watching traditional broadcast TV are “unconnected”? When I watch television, I am extremely connected, regardless of the source of the content. Once I have found the program I want to watch, I am intensely connected with the story and the characters. I am also connected with my comfortable chair. I occasionally glance on my mobile phone or in the fridge, but these are rare distractions from the big screen. For me TV is like an interactive version of cinema where I focus on the content I have chosen to see and forget about the rest of the world. Why call viewers “connected” based on the source of their content? Does it matter if we watch in a linear or non-linear way? Or does “connected” refer to us as social beings, how we connect to others?

    Understanding the connection with the content

    Some viewers tweet posts about what they watch and update their online profile to let others share in what they are viewing. Personally, I regard this as a waste of time. I might be connected with people in the room while I’m watching TV, but I am not interested in connecting with other viewers online to exchange comments on that program. I prefer to watch TV uninterrupted and unconnected. When watching TV, we create very direct and intimate relationships with the content. I can be absorbed by it, emotionally touched, informed or I simply have a good time. Sometimes I am disappointed, angry or upset. Call me old fashioned. All this happens (offline and online) in my living room, where I am cocooned in the program. The next day I might share my opinion with others, but through my viewing behavior I leave very little traces a broadcaster could scrape off the web. Maybe the distinction between connected and unconnected does not reflect how a TV audience is related to TV content. But “connection” is a key description to understand viewers and their needs. How can broadcasters and other content providers connect with viewers? How can they keep track of what content people feel connected to and what content they would prefer to avoid next time? Sure, broadcasters have access to daily ratings to see the number of viewers, but that does not measure the wants and needs of their audience.

    Content Appreciation

    To connect with a TV audience through research, you need to select a representative group of viewers. You should contact them in the proper way, ask the right questions, and listen carefully to their motivations and reactions. We have set up a system to do so. On an average day, more than 18,000 viewers in the UK, Russia, Ireland, the Netherlands and Flanders combined, tell us what they thought of all the programs they saw the day before. This means one day after the audience ratings are available, you receive the full profiles of what dramas were most entertaining, what news programs viewers felt provided the best information, and what chat shows had the best guests. You know what programs were most talked about. You see unfiltered comments on what the viewers actually thought of all the programs they watched. Using our dashboard, you can benchmark your own content against a relevant selection of your competition. We call this ”Content Appreciation” and we think it is the best solution for broadcasters to connect with their audience. hbspt.cta.load(2405078, 'c67ebd12-0b49-4cfd-887b-b1a892698de5', {});
    • 06/02/17
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Advertising
    • TV Audience Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    MMS and GfK close-in on Total Video Ratings Currency in Sweden

    MMS – which measures the moving image in Sweden – has released its digital ad ratings service. The service covers video advertisements on broadcasters’ websites and apps viewed across PC, smartphone, tablet and smart TV. It is built upon GfK’s data integration and data science capabilities that fuse MMS’s multi-source data streams into actionable currency.
    • 05/19/17
    • Automotive
    • Media Measurement
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Mobile is the means to improving traction for your crossmedia automotive campaigns

    As an automotive marketer, you face a great many challenges. Not only is the auto industry in the fast lane when it comes to change, but so too is the media landscape you must navigate to attract Connected Consumers. Online media’s increasing importance in the purchase journey combined with the proliferation of connected devices, however, presents a significant opportunity and route to maximizing the efficiency of your campaigns. While traditional TV remains the go-to media channel to drive brand image and reach a mass audience, online campaigns can add extra reach and help target a specific group. More specifically, you need to go mobile and devise content specifically for this channel. Here’s why:

    Go mobile to get more mileage from your campaigns

    Our research shows that mobile accounts for a significant share of digital ad impressions. According to our Crossmedia Visualizer data, based on online users in Germany, more than one third (37.4%) of all ad impressions within automotive online touchpoints occur exclusively on mobile devices. When looking at smartphones only, they deliver 20.4% exclusive reach, while tablets deliver 14.3%. Mobile use is even more pronounced among Gen Y (20-34 year olds) in this market, where 45.3% of impressions in the automotive category are exclusively on mobile. What’s more, our research shows that the reach of Facebook on mobile devices among younger target age groups is nearly three times higher than that of desktop ad placements. Also when run in addition to TV campaigns, paid placements on Facebook can extend incremental reach by 4.5%. This is even before considering the viral effects a campaign can have. Younger age groups are not only critical for brand building but are also, because of their affinity for using mobile and social media, open to campaigns that use these channels. What this means is that if you aren’t reaching them on mobile and via social media through paid placements and the like, your competitors surely will.

    Fine-tune your use of mobile channels for incremental reach and targeting

    The increasing usage of mobile devices among the online population in the auto sector is also evident when we look at the websites of the top three premium car brands in Germany. While desktop still delivers the greatest share of impressions versus mobile for Mercedes-Benz (64.3% vs. 35.8%) and Audi (64.3% vs. 32.2%), for BMW, mobile provides a 53.3% share of impressions versus 45.9% for desktop. These factors combine to underline the need to optimize the mobile elements of your cross-media campaigns to target today’s – and tomorrow’s – Connected Consumers where they are. Put another way, if you want to get the mileage from your cross-media campaigns, you need to fine-tune your use of mobile channels to deliver that all-important incremental reach and targeting of content. You can master today’s multi-channel marketing reality and track, analyze and optimize your media planning with our Crossmedia Visualizer tool. Test it out for yourself for free to discover:
    • which car brand sites have the highest net reach among the online population in Germany and how this has changed over last five months
    • which of the key online auto sites in Germany has the highest net reach and number of unique users
    • what the top auto sites’ reach is by device and which site indexes highest for reaching those who intend to buy a new car (timeframe)
    • and more…
    hbspt.cta.load(2405078, '9be31c2f-73f9-4778-95e0-56fc8dec9a51', {});
    • 04/06/17
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    Netflix now offers downloadable content to watch offline. So what?

    Netflix was the last to join the likes of Amazon Prime and catch-up services in offering its subscribers the flexibility to watch content offline. For a while, Netflix officials have been shutting down all downloading queries cold. Their decision to “focus on the 95% use case where customers watch movies when they have network access and not to focus on the 5% case of airplane use or watching movies in the backseat of your car,” quoting Gibson Biddle at the 2012 Stack Exchange, was followed through for many years. Then, as the company focused on growth outside the US, the offline mode was kind of a deal breaker to push subscription rates in emerging markets. In those countries, consumers had already adapted their behaviour to lower levels of broadband speeds and Wi-Fi access and a Netflix offering would have seemed incomplete or impractical without the option to download content.

    Downloading options introduced by Netflix

    So, as of the 30th November 2016, we got what we wished for; Netflix introduced downloading options for users worldwide, benefiting even us in the very much developed world in the UK. But have Netflix subscribers responded enthusiastically to the long-awaited downloading feature? Here are the facts:
    • The word has spread: the vast majority (63%) of Netflix subscribers are aware that downloading is now available
    • However, a mere 3% are using it
    • Of those who use it, two thirds do so a couple of times a month or less
    In essence, the download feature is rarely utilized by Netflix users, with the majority of content still being streamed directly. When watching a TV Series that has been downloaded, viewing is more likely to be just one episode, compared with if that content was streamed directly. ‘Binge watching’ is also less likely if content has been downloaded rather than streamed.

    Why aren’t users binge-watching downloadable content?

    ‘Binge-watching’- the high level control over what, when and for how long you watch a show (you just don’t dare the thought of stop watching) is a concept that seems to be losing its coolness if all is downloaded for convenience. When respondents were asked about the reasons they haven’t used this feature yet, the half-hearted ‘I view/stream all I want at home’ response ranked first (with 52% of Netflix subs agreeing). Technical barriers like ‘lack of storage space’ (27%) and ‘don’t know how’ (17%) were mentioned next, and finally 7% could not find content they wanted to download. For some, the downloading experience was restrictive, if not unpleasant: the unsuitability for desktop streamers, also for Android devices that don’t support HD officially, further technical barriers for Chromecast or AirPlay users, also limitations around the number of devices that can download at the same time, etc. (the list goes on) – all these combined with an incomplete downloading library and the enthusiasm fades away quickly.

    Netflix = streaming

    This is consistent with how users are using Amazon’s downloading option too, averaging at an unchanged 5% since launch. In essence, a download sweeps away the beauty of the ‘caught in the moment’, unplanned viewing experience and is reduced to a practicality function. So, thank you Netflix for the ‘nice to have’ perk; it’s got to be there even if hardly ever used; for peace of mind, planes and dodgy Wi-Fi service at hotels. Whilst acknowledging the ever changing video landscape, I would be really surprised if Netflix’s downloading usage presents an uptake over the next few quarter results of our SVOD study. It’s only when post-Generation Z consumers start their own revolution on the way content gets consumed that we will be in for a surprise! Mary Kyriakidi is the Director of Media & Entertainment at GfK. To share your thoughts, please email her at mary.kyriakidi@gfk.com or leave a comment below.
Contact GfK
Marius Amuraritei
Romania
General