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Smart Insights: Consumer Goods

The number of touchpoints between brands and consumers is increasing at an unprecedented rate. Consumers are seeking richer retail experiences, rather than simply acquiring new products. There is also an intense competition for loyalty.

To be successful, consumer goods (FMCG, domestic appliances, home and living) companies need a comprehensive understanding of what is driving consumer choices and experiences at every touchpoint.

GfK's consumer goods research and insights illuminate the trends behind today's market realities and tomorrow's consumer demands.

Fast Moving Consumer Goods

Home Appliances

Latest insights

Here you can find the latest insights for consumer goods industry. View all insights

    • 12/12/17
    • Press
    • Financial Services
    • Retail
    • Consumer Goods
    • Geomarketing
    • Geodata
    • Global
    • English

    Purchasing power Germany 2018

    Germans’ 2018 purchasing power will rise to €22,992 per person according to the GfK study released today. This amounts to a nominal per-person increase of 2.8 percent, or €633.
    • 11/30/17
    • Retail
    • Consumer Goods
    • Shopper
    • Global
    • English

    Turning omnishopping to omnibuying – the Amazon way

    Earlier this year, Amazon shook up the retail world with its acquisition of Whole Foods. What could the online giant and the high-end grocer possibly have in common – and how could they help each other? Our survey soon after the announcement showed that many consumers were already shopping from both retailers. Hopes were high for a cross-pollination of services and ideas; consumers’ wish lists included more high-tech devices in store and free grocery shipping for Amazon Prime members. These first-level priorities may take a while to fully develop, and some may never come to pass. So how does the Amazon/Whole Foods match square with the ways people are shopping today? Does the alliance make dollars and cents in the 2018 marketplace – as well as 2025 and beyond? The latest results from our annual FutureBuy® study provide a fresh impression of how people are searching for and buying products of all types; and our data show why Amazon’s big move into grocery may have been more than prescient. Here are four insights from FutureBuy that show how Amazon and Whole Foods can take their synergies to the next level.
    1. Omnichannel shopping rises in FMCG
    Though the US has long trailed other regions in online shopping for everyday household items, American consumers are catching up. Four in 10 (40%) US shoppers said they used both in-store and online resources (“omnishopping”) to hunt for beauty and personal care products – up from 32% last year. We also saw notable omnishopping jumps in
    • Packaged-food and beverages: 23% (up from 14%)
    • OTC healthcare: 27% (up from 21%)
    • Household washing and cleaning products: 25% (up from 15%)
    If shoppers are ready to hunt for their daily home and personal needs online, then the worlds of Amazon and Whole Foods are already merging.
    1. “Webrooming” tops “showrooming”
    According to the new FutureBuy, shoppers are almost twice as likely to search for a product online and then buy in a store (“webrooming”) as to research in-store and then buy online (“showrooming”). This means that being in both worlds – bricks and clicks – gives you a much better chance of capturing a sale, and of building brand recognition and trust throughout the purchase journey.
    1. Click & collect has a bright future
    In the US, 40% of shoppers expect to rely on click and collect services – which allow in-person pickup of online purchases – more in the coming years. One in six (16%) shoppers is already using click and collect regularly, up more than 50% from last year (10%); and Generation Y (ages 27 to 36) is most likely to embrace the service, while Boomers are showing the slowest uptake. For groceries specifically, Gen Y is more likely to regularly use click and collect – and to report a higher anticipated use in the future. All of this evidence suggests that Whole Foods locations will grow in importance as pickup spots for Amazon purchases.
    1. Consumers warming to targeted ads
    Though some remain skittish about data privacy, shoppers increasingly are embracing the perks of online tracking and targeting. More than four in ten (43%) say they like it when a website keeps track of their visits and recommends products – up from 35% last year. And almost one-third (30%) like it when retailers contact them on their smartphones when they are out shopping. With its in-store environment and rich data from online and in-person purchases alike, Amazon/Whole Foods will become the master of targeting across the bricks and clicks world. Of course, some services and ideas will not be truly proven until they are launched; then consumers can vote with their wallets. But from the perspective of today’s shopping mindset, the future belongs to Amazon’s new in-store/online hybrid. Joe Beier is EVP, Shopper & Retail Strategy at GfK. hbspt.cta.load(2405078, '735256a2-b3ed-434f-83e9-f37e512d7924', {});
    • 11/27/17
    • Consumer Goods
    • Global
    • English

    Integrated kitchens: A healthy market with attractive opportunities

    The future of the kitchen is bright, with integrated kitchens and connected built-in appliances emerging as key trends in a healthy market with attractive opportunities for brands. 32.3 million integrated kitchens were sold globally in 2016, with China being far and away the number one leading market at 18.1 million integrated kitchens sold. However, accelerated growth is expected globally with all major regions forecasting to be positive in 2017 and beyond. While Asia shows the biggest growth potential, built-in connected appliances have been a major innovation driver in Western Europe, specifically in Germany which accounts for two thirds of the market.

    Taking a closer look at leading edge consumers in China

    ‘Western’ appliances like dishwashers, (steam) ovens and microwaves are mainly sold with premium pre-decorated flats to date. We expect a spill-over into the mass market over the coming years as Western manufacturers ramp up production capacities for such appliances in China. Still integrated cabinets, along with hoods and built-in hobs will also in the nearer future be the main driver for the double digit value growth potential of the integrated kitchen market in China. The market has benefitted from a unique channel shop type structure, with cabinet stores (37% of sales), built-in appliance stores (31%), kitchen and appliances stores (30%) and DIY superstores (2%) all contributing to its success. With a market value size of 118 billion CNY in 2016, China’s integrated cabinet market is expected to continue to grow steadily and should experience ~15% year over year growth with a projected market value of 155 billion CNY in 2018 and 177 billion CNY in 2019.

    Connected appliances – A fast growing niche in Western Europe

    In Western Europe, connected built-in appliances have been a major innovation driver as a fast growing niche. Germany has taken a commanding lead in market share this year (67%), followed by Austria (7%) and Great Britain (6%), according to measurements of fourteen Western European countries by GfK Point of Sales Tracking.

    Factors contributing to market strength

    Changing household structures and a significantly increasing number of one and two person households have been a positive baseline factor for the integrated kitchen market. In Asia, massive growth of the Middle Class is another contributing factor of note. Integrated kitchens have proven to be a healthy market with attractive opportunities. Knowing which markets have the greatest growth potential and which products are driving innovation are the insights that will prove to be most valuable to brands. For more information on our sales data for major domestic appliances (as well as small domestic appliances and other product groups), please email me at anton.eckl@gfk.com. hbspt.cta.load(2405078, '80f4359a-da91-49c6-8847-5af112034621', {});
    • 11/07/17
    • Retail
    • Consumer Goods
    • Global
    • English

    Beware the star player: Why category management is the ultimate team game

    Category management is the ultimate team sport. Smart retailers, just like good football club managers, know that it takes a range of skills to create a winning team. The secret to category growth and success lies in picking the best combination of SKUs to achieve the highest category penetration. So why do so many categories look like a jumble of products all individually vying for the shopper’s attention? Manufacturers need to face up to shrinking shelf space. Four key trends are converging to create a perfect storm, and the result is that some SKUs will be relegated to the bench. Discounters such as Aldi and Lidl are redefining the notion of convenience and enabling shoppers to save on their two most precious resources, time and money. Meanwhile “ambient categories” which don’t need to be hand selected are increasingly transitioning online. Barriers to new entrants have fallen meaning that existing brands are at risk of being squeezed out. And to cap it all, private label brands are growing both in volume and prominence.

    Teamwork is the key to success

    Against this backdrop, the need to create a winning team on the shelf is paramount. Every SKU needs to earn its place on the shelf– and to make a match-winning contribution. Tesco is currently playing an excellent game on their whiskey shelf with a hero area. The bottles displayed behind the wooden and glass cabinet are super-premium, and with a price tag to match. Old Pulteney, at an eye-watering £100 per bottle, is priced well beyond the average Tesco shopper. So what game is the retailer playing? Including Old Pulteney in the assortment achieves two important objectives. The listing is intended to attract a different shopper who probably wouldn’t visit the store otherwise. They are likely to be affluent with a higher spend per visit. Secondly, Tesco wants to frame the value of other products on the shelf. Having a price tier with an attractive product which is unaffordable to most often has the effect of making the other (still relatively high ticket) items appear more palatable. So, brands at opposite ends of the spectrum become teammates.

    Train for success

    But how can we test what is happening at the shelf? How can retailers and manufacturers be sure that they are fielding the right team? The answer lies in observing shopper behavior. Fundamentally, category managers need to understand which SKUs are substitutable (i.e. easily interchangeable), and which are incremental (unique to that buying occasion). The difference is crucial, and it is vital to understand the interplay between the two. Using a virtual store platform, we can identify shopper repertoires and establish which products they consider. We then ask shoppers to make product selections based on various versions of the shelf to establish which products consistently end up in the shopping basket.

    Creating a winning team

    Using this data, we can identify which combination of SKUs create the highest total penetration. As well as establishing the point of diminishing returns, we can identify the niche products that will deliver incremental sales. Armed with these insights, category managers can optimize their assortment, and create effective team sheets which can be adapted according to the channel to deliver a winning team every time. James LLewellyn is the UK Head of Shopper. Please email James.Llewellyn@gfk.com or leave a comment below to share your thoughts. hbspt.cta.load(2405078, 'e4b9c2bf-f5ab-44f4-987f-f13c79aea956', {});
Solutions
  • Brand and Customer Experience (BaCE)

    Brand and Customer Experience (BaCE)

    Brands are under pressure to develop emotional connections and relationships with consumers and business decision makers.  Brands need to respond in-the-moment, to enrich the customer experience – and develop strategies that influence ”moments of truth” throughout individual brand journeys.  

  • Consumer Panels

    Consumer Panels

    Your business is all about your consumers. So understanding them is essential in ensuring your products and services meet their needs, and in identifying opportunities for growth.

    Our international consumer panel data and research expertise provide you with smart customer insights into who your consumers are, their attitudes and behaviors, across channels.

  • Digital Market Intelligence (DMI)

    Digital Market Intelligence (DMI)

    When consumers shop, search, communicate, gather information and engage with companies or brands online, they behave differently depending on which device or screen they are using. They expect a consistent experience regardless of the channel or device they are using.

  • Point of Sales Tracking

    Point of Sales Tracking

    Retailers and manufacturers are under pressure to develop products and services that maximize sales and profit and to keep customers coming back.

    Success relies on having the most up-to-date sales data, combined with robust analysis to understand which products and services are performing well in the market – and which are not. With this information, clients can set clear strategies for commercial growth and increase return on investment.

  • Market Opportunities and Innovation (MOI)

    Market Opportunities and Innovation (MOI)

    Brands are under constant pressure to maintain relevance in an increasingly crowded market. Identifying when, where and how to deliver compelling experiences that deliver new value for both consumers and brands is critical.

  • Shopper

    Shopper

    Digital continues to open up new paths to purchase, changing how and where people shop. More and more data becomes available every day, as shoppers embrace multi-channel brand experiences. To stay competitive in this big data, multi-channel environment, businesses need to identify and leverage the most relevant data along the entire path to purchase. 

  • User Experience (UX)

    User Experience (UX)

    Our user experience (UX) research and design experts help our clients create and improve customer experiences for existing or new products and services

    Today’s consumer is bombarded with promises for compelling experiences. They are sophisticated and demanding.  To be successful, a new product or service needs to be intuitive, usable, engaging and desirable. The user experience needs to be emotional in order to be memorable.

  • Geomarketing

    Geomarketing

    Our geomarketing solutions and consultancy provide our clients with smart insights into location-specific factors that impact the success of business sites, shops, sales territories, target groups, as well as chain store and distribution networks.

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