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Insights relevantes e acionáveis: Moda e estilo de vida

A indústria da moda e estilo de vida enfrenta inúmeros desafios: desde o crescimento do fenómeno de omnicanal, que coloca pressão sobre a fidelização dos clientes, passando pelos modelos de negócio de otimização da distribuição, aliado a estratégias promocionais agressivas, até aos anseios dos consumidores face a experiências de compra relevantes. 

Para dar resposta a este novo paradigma no relacionamento entre as marcas e os consumidores, as empresas da área da moda e estilo de vida necessitam de estar dotadas de uma compreensão clara das atitude e dos comportamentos dos consumidores, bem como de conhecimento sobre o desempenho das suas marcas em cada ponto de experiência e contacto.  

A GfK acompanha as preferências dos consumidores, os seus hábitos de compra, e os drivers que influenciam o comportamento de compra, assim como as experiências em todos os pontos de contacto com a sua marca, seja no segmento de produtos de vestuário, têxteis, artigos desportivos, e acessórios. Os nossos especialistas em investigação de mercado de moda e estilo de vida analisam todas estas dimensões com o objectivo de identificar as áreas que geram um maior incremento na satisfação e fidelização dos seus clientes. Igualmente, identificamos ações claras que contribuem para o crescimento da sua empresa no seu ambiente competitivo.

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Últimos Insights

Pode encontrar aqui os últimos insights do sector de moda e estilo de vida. Ver todos os insights

    • 09/05/16
    • Press
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Home Appliances
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Consumer Goods
    • Home and Living
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global Study
    • Portugal
    • Portuguese

    Novo estudo: “O que é que os Portugueses melhorariam nas suas casas?”

    Quando se fala em melhorias na casa, a decoração e/ou o design interior está no topo da lista.

    • 02/10/16
    • Press
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Retail
    • Consumer Goods
    • FMCG
    • Brand and Customer Experience
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Portugal
    • Portuguese

    Portugueses gastam mais de 4 horas semanais em cuidados pessoais

    Estudo global da GfK revela os principais motivos para cuidar da aparência

    • 07/11/17
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Technology
    • Global
    • English

    The devil wears smartwatches: Why fashion brands are sizing up the wearables market

    It’s safe to say that many of the first smartwatch devices to hit the market were seen by consumers as kind of ugly, a little bit clunky and certainly nothing you’d catch Miranda Priestly wearing on her wrist. And as discussed in Tech Trends, wearables on the whole have yet to make their mark across today’s global industries. But now, with the help of big fashion brands, we’re starting to see some attractive developments and growth potential for these products. Fashion brands have clocked that smartwatches can be a lucrative area within the wearables market – primarily because models that look appealing matter most to a large number of consumers. Health and fitness trackers currently dominate the marketplace. Our latest data from January – March 2017 shows that in Europe, they account for 54% of unit sales in the region while in Asia the figure is 47%. Meanwhile, smartwatches are still in second but increased to 31% and 20% respectively.* So far, wearables have suited consumers whose main focus is to stay in shape – but what’s out there for people who want to embrace the latest technology and look stylish at the same time?

    Watch out for the real trend setters

    This is where designer brands have the edge. The technology industry has been known to set trends, but let’s not forget that fashion is no slouch in this department. Fashion businesses think about design. Before getting bogged down with the technical details, their first priority is to produce something that looks good. And this is where the opportunities lie. After all, wearables, as the name suggests, should be items people are able to wear – without looking like Inspector Gadget.

    Giving consumers what they want

    Tech players have tended to focus on device features as they cater for specific segments. This has brought success in sectors such as Health but as a result we’ve often seen a “one size fits all” approach to looks because design has been somewhat of an afterthought. Meanwhile, brands such as Michael Kors and Fossil have been offering fashion conscious consumers smartwatches that come in different styles and colors for different seasons and genders. They have started to think like their consumers and identified that it’s choices they may be after. The key issue here is whether design alone will be enough to boost smartwatch growth. Will consumers want more than a cool brand name if they are shelling out high sums of money for this technology?

    What needs to happen?

    To succeed, fashion companies must nail the looks as well as the technology of their wearable devices. It’s important that they include enough features for a smartwatch to be worth purchasing over a normal watch, but not too many that the device is overwhelming and confusing. This combination will be vital and opens up possibilities for tech and fashion companies to work together to realize growth in this market. Of course, there is a long way to go before we see smartwatches on the Paris catwalk, however, if designers continue to make strides in this area there may be a positive future for the wearables market. * Estimated total market base GfK POS data Jan 17 – Mar 17 from 16 European countries and CN, JP, KR, AU, TW, SG, HK, MY hbspt.cta.load(2405078, '21a485b5-4b1f-4174-9057-4e4a57d01b68', {});
    • 04/13/17
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Sustainability and ethics: How to keep up with the fashion industry

    “Fashion is not necessarily about labels. It’s not about brands. It’s about something else that comes from within you…” – Ralph Lauren Nowadays, style is not only about the logo you are wearing but the values that it represents. With this in mind, fashion brands need to know their consumers more than ever before in order to connect emotionally with them. Here are the three values fashion companies must embrace to build brand perception and stay relevant in a demanding market.

    1. Sustainable fashion

    It is becoming easier to see why high end and luxury fashion brands can no longer ignore sustainability. In fact, our research (1) shows that ‘protecting the environment’ is significantly higher up on consumers’ priority list than ‘looking good’. As fashion consumers grow more conscious, they also tend to trust brands less, and being credible becomes an issue for all labels, everywhere. Our data also indicates how informed and serious about environmental and social issues consumers have become over the past decade. This is no longer ‘fringe’ behavior but a market-wide opportunity.

    2. Ethical initiatives

    Indeed, we have witnessed many brands evolving and communicating their efforts in making their production more eco-friendly and respectful of fair-trade. It is an important evolution in the history of fashion, which until recently was characterized by a “fast fashion era”, resulting in too many articles of clothing produced that become obsolete within weeks. It is the younger generations who are mainly to thank for this move, thus, we are observing a new age in which fashion consumers will tend to focus their spending on quality over quantity, piling less in their wardrobe. As a reaction to this, fashion companies are compelled to become more transparent when it comes to how their clothes are made. We can see how the leading fashion industry environmental group, MADE-BY, has helped make it happen. The organisation, along with major UK companies like Ted Baker, worked together on individual sustainability programmes, helping them to reduce the amount of hazardous chemicals in their production, and increase the integration of  organic materials.

    3. Recycled is the new “en-vogue”

    Now that the bloggers, critics and other public faces of fashion have taken to promoting what’s good for the planet, for consumers, and for the companies’ employees, the high-end and luxury fashion companies made sure to follow the trend:
    • Hermes created “Le petit h”, which consists of creative pieces and accessories only made from the left-over materials from other bags, scarves, etc.
    • Adidas has launched a collection being marketed as designed to “help to clean up the Earth’s oceans” by using the waste floating around the world to make their footwear. Whilst 7,000 pairs of the UltraBOOST Uncaged Parley were planned, the three-stripes brand says it wants to produce more.
    Examples of these initiatives are numerous, and many start-ups followed their lead, creating a range of niche products, from salmon-skinned wallets to shirts of polyester from recycled drink bottles.

    Conclusion

    The world of fashion is powerful, and a close eye is being kept on its actions. It’s essential for brands to understand not only the role of sustainability within the decision making process of consumers, but also to explore their attitudes and behaviors. The question is, how do today’s connected consumers build brand perception and how can brands stay relevant in this demanding market? (1) Research taken from GfK Consumer Life (Roper Reports©), global annual survey of consumer of attitudes, beliefs and behaviors. Tiphaine Nilias is a Research Manager at GfK. To share your thoughts, please email tiphaine.nilias@gfk.com or leave a comment below.
Solutions
  • Experiência de marca e cliente

    Experiência de marca e cliente

    As marcas estão sob pressão para desenvolver ligações emocionais e estabelecer relações duradoras com consumidores, mas também com os gestores de decisão das empresas.

  • Digital Market Intelligence (DMI)

    Digital Market Intelligence (DMI)

    Quando os consumidores compram, pesquisam, comunicam, reúnem informações e interagem com as empresas e marcas no “universo” online, eles comportam-se de diferentes formas, dependendo de quais os dispositivos ou écrans que estão a utilizar.

  • Market Opportunities and Innovation (MOI)

    Market Opportunities and Innovation (MOI)

    As marcas estão sob constante pressão para manterem a relevância num mercado cada vez mais saturado.

  • POS Tracking

    POS Tracking

    Tanto os retalhistas como os fabricantes estão em constante pressão para desenvolverem produtos e serviços que maximizem as vendas e os lucros, e ao mesmo tempo para fidelizar os seus clientes.

  • Estratégia de Shopper e Retalho

    Estratégia de Shopper e Retalho

    A era digital continua a abrir novos caminhos face à compra, alterando como e onde as pessoas compram. Diariamente e de forma crescente, existe mais informação disponível e de rápido acesso a todos, à medida que os shoppers vêm adotando experiências de marca em múltiplos canais.

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