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  • Map of the month: Anholt-GfK Nation Brands Index study, 2017
    • 12/14/17
    • Global
    • English

    Map of the month: Anholt-GfK Nation Brands Index study, 2017

    This year’s Anholt-GfK Nation Brands IndexSM study finds that a robust, well-rounded reputation is the key to safeguarding or improving a nation’s overall Reputation.

    • 12/12/17
    • Health
    • Global
    • English

    Five ways brand teams can align messages and touchpoints for greater commercial effectiveness

    Commercial effectiveness 2.0

    Now that many biopharma companies have turned their focus to professional and patient centricity, and even more have upped their game by using multiple, specialized experience points to serve doctors and patients better, it is time to bring the new approach to maturity by increasing coordination and effectiveness in the new multi-channel models.

    How will you meet the challenges of this new pharma/biotech commercial model?  We would like to share five ways to improve the metrics and analytics that help you optimize your combined sales force, touchpoints and message recall, and meet the challenges of this new pharma/biotech commercial model. Depending on your current business challenges, at least one approach is very likely to help you as we move into this new biopharma commercial model.

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    Five of our analytical approaches to set the wheels in motion:

    1. Improve the measurement of your competitive standing with a multidimensional share of voice

    While you may be winning share of voice with reps alone, you may be falling behind in the overall race. Consider tracking your multidimensional touchpoint reach for a more holistic and accurate guidepost.

    2. Coordinate multiple touchpoints, with the sales rep at the center

    Biopharma’s use of multichannel to reach no-see physicians has matured. Now, forward-leaning marketing and sales leaders are leveraging “rep- triggering” technology to meet customer needs. Fully leverage reps’ clearer perspective of physicians’ imperatives, and empower reps to meet customer needs. Then measure the commercial impact of the new multi-touchpoint experience.

    3. Combine the optimal set of touchpoints to improve the overall customer experience

    The needs of healthcare professionals (HCPs) are increasingly complicated. Use multi-touchpoint analytics to find the combination of touchpoints that does the best job of meeting those crucially important customer needs.

    4. Focus on impactful messages for greater impact on prescribing behavior

    Reach doesn’t matter if the message isn’t relevant. And a high-impact message that isn’t remembered is a lost opportunity. Many brands still focus too much on the percent of physicians who recall messages. In celebrating the success of high recall for some messages, they forget to test each message’s impact, and then they miss the insight that recall may be the lowest on messages that have the greatest impact on prescribing behavior.

    5. Concentrate marketing investments on the most effective touchpoints for your critical messages

    Each touchpoint can have a higher or lower transmission effectiveness for your critical messages. Brand teams and sales forces need to remember to assess their portfolio of touchpoints with regard to their effectiveness in transmitting key messages. Message transmission lets brand teams focus their investments on those touchpoints that get critical messages across to the physicians who need to know.

    Begin driving commercial effectiveness for your brand

    By applying our techniques, you’ll discover how you can align messages and touchpoints to optimize their impact.

    For a deeper dive into these five techniques for driving your brand’s commercial effectiveness, download our white paper, “Five ways brand teams can align messages and touchpoints for greater commercial effectiveness”.

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    Then let’s start a conversation so we can help guide you in the process.

    Tom Hartley is Senior Vice President of GfK’s Health business. He can be reached at tom.hartley@gfk.com.

  • Purchasing power Germany 2018
    • 12/12/17
    • Press
    • Financial Services
    • Retail
    • Consumer Goods
    • Geomarketing
    • Geodata
    • Global
    • English

    Purchasing power Germany 2018

    Germans’ 2018 purchasing power will rise to €22,992 per person according to the GfK study released today. This amounts to a nominal per-person increase of 2.8 percent, or €633.

    • 12/11/17
    • Financial Services
    • Technology
    • Global
    • English

    What’s really holding back in-store mobile payments?

    “Cashless made effortless!” “Turn your phone into your wallet!” “It’s not exactly magic, but it feels that way!”

    The clear message that mobile wallet purveyors are sending to the market is that mobile payments are easy. So why is adoption so low? According to our 2017 FutureBuy® report, only 25% of US shoppers have made an in-store mobile payment in the last six months.

    Reasons for low adoption

    One obvious stumbling block is availability. A recent JP Morgan Chase study suggests that only 36% of retailers currently accept mobile payments. But availability alone cannot account for this disappointing level of adoption. Smartphones are omnipresent in consumers’ lives — and, as our 2017 FutureBuy study shows, US consumers equate smartphones with shopping; 39% say, “My mobile device is quickly becoming my most important shopping tool,” up 11% since 2016. In fact, CNET reported that smartphones accounted for 21% of online sales on Cyber Monday, with US shoppers spending $1.59 billion using their phones — a new record. So where is the comparable mobile in-store spend?

    Our recent research points to one important barrier for consumers: security. With data breaches at Equifax, Yahoo, and even the IRS making headlines, it is no surprise that security is on the minds of consumers. Research from GfK Consumer Life quantifies this anxiety:

       

    • 36% of Americans are always concerned about their safety and security (2017)
    • 48% of Americans feel it’s very important to actively manage their online identity and personal information (2016)
    • “Personal information getting into the wrong hands” is the #9 concern among Americans from a list of 21 concerns — up 4 places since 2016 (2017)
    •  

    Looking more specifically at payments, cash still plays a big role – and one of its key benefits is anonymity. Among Americans with household incomes of $75,000 a year and greater, 55% say they always or sometimes use cash to protect their identities. Those in the payments industry know that using a mobile wallet is probably the safest way to pay; but US consumers do not perceive things that way. When we asked which non-cash method of payment was most secure, mobile wallets came in last, with just 4% of consumers (compared to 21% saying swiping their card, and 70% saying EMV).

    Opening the door to mobile payment usage

    Comfort with financial services and knowledge of the products and services seems to play a big role in opening the door to mobile payment usage. Again, looking at our FutureBuy study, we see significant differences in attitudes towards mobile payments when we compare Leading Edge Consumers (LECs) to the general public. The LEC group consists of three different types of shoppers; Early adopters, Influentials and Passionate shoppers.

     

    15% of respondents in the 2017 FutureBuy study were identified as LECs – and they are much more apt to see mobile payments as secure:

    Making payments with mobile device is more secure than other methods” — 57% LECs vs 23% general public.

    “I am confident that my mobile device payments are 100% secure” — 58% LECs vs. 23% general public.

    Not coincidentally, LECs use of mobile payments in-store over the last 6 months dwarfs that of the general public, 50% to 25%.

    Perhaps, the messaging at the top of this post needs to be revamped. Easy is not doing it. While security is often buried in promotional content to some degree, elevating this message to the first position could be a key to quicker adoption. The message of “the safest way to pay” may be the path forward for mobile payments.

    For more information, please contact Keith Bossey at keith.bossey@gfk.com.

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  • Medical Marketing and Media’s annual feature
    • 12/08/17
    • Health
    • Global
    • English

    Medical Marketing and Media’s annual feature

    Looking ahead to 2018, the most promising products in pharma's pipeline will compete in a landscape that increasingly rewards big risks and places an emphasis on novel mechanisms. Read more.

  • GfK Supply Chain Insights
    • 12/06/17
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Distribution and Supply Chain Management
    • Global
    • English

    GfK Supply Chain Insights

    Join our free webinar based on point of sales and distribution panel data to optimize your supply chain management and discover more about today’s key tech trends.

  • Five ways brand teams can align messages and touchpoints for greater commercial effectiveness
    • 12/06/17
    • Health
    • Global
    • English

    Five ways brand teams can align messages and touchpoints for greater commercial effectiveness

    Our white paper presents a clear path to help brand teams and sales forces improve commercial effectiveness and maximize message recall and SFE in this evolving multichannel world.

    • 12/05/17
    • Financial Services
    • User Experience (UX)
    • Global
    • English

    6 design principles for a better FinTech user experience

    The pace of technology has transformed our lives in recent years. Finance is no exception. What used to be a question of “cash or credit” has given way to myriad choice. Pay for your groceries with Apple Pay or Google Wallet? Split the check with friends via cash, Venmo, Paypal, or Chase Pay? Invest with Fidelity or through an online platform such as Wealthfront?

    With so many options, users, especially those in the coveted 18-35 demographic demand a great experience in exchange for their loyalty. But older users should not be ignored – they have come to expect a level of professionalism and personalization from their offline bankers and financial service providers. This should carry through online. As a user experience researcher I’ve seen how providing an enjoyable, seamless experience based on a solid customer understanding leads to successful products in this marketplace. Here are some principles financial companies should keep in mind as they look to stay ahead among the ever evolving outlets for people to spend, save and exchange money.

    Technology should enable solutions that make people’s lives easier

    With a straightforward interface and easy to understand investment philosophy, Betterment has transformed the process of setting and investing in long terms goals from what can often feel overwhelming, murky, or confusing to a relatively transparent and achievable experience. How? By creating an online investment platform that combines a straightforward interface with an easy to understand investment philosophy. They’ve also used technology to enhance things internally, by weaving it into their back-end process. Betterment uses artificial intelligence to match customers’ paper checks with their accounts. By automating a formerly tedious task, they have freed their employees to do more interesting and challenging work. Think of technology as a tool to solve a problem (e.g., make investing easier), not the answer itself.

    Context is key

    Where will your app be used? Are users excited about saving for a big purchase or nervous about paying their bills? What other apps is it competing with on their phone? Across studies, users have told us that limited memory makes their phone’s home screen valuable real estate. A mobile payment app might check all of the usability boxes in testing, but if it doesn’t integrate well with your user’s favorite shopping apps or sites, it won’t add value, and will likely be deleted.

    Understand mental models

    Understanding current conventions and learning about what else your customers use and like enables you to incorporate common design patterns that make it easy for a first time user to have a seamless experience. Most people have at least one, if not multiple banking and payment apps. These inform expectations and habits for new apps which means that if you’re trying out a cool new design pattern, you’ll need to soften the learning curve with pointers on how it works.

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    Enable customers to control the interaction

    In conducting financial research, we often hear users say that they wouldn’t sign up for a financial product via mobile phone. Their perception is that financial tasks require the security and larger screen of a computer. Address this by enabling customers to begin a process on their mobile phones, when and where it is convenient, and then save progress for later completion on a larger screen. This gives users control and adds a sense of security and assurance.

    Make it intuitive

    Finance can be a difficult subject – the best sites use straightforward language to clearly explain new processes or topics without dumbing it down. Embed help links for uncommon terms make sure terms and conditions are easy to access and understand. Enable users to intuitively understand what they are being asked to do and to quickly find needed information with a clean, uncluttered design.

    But include some friction

    Somewhat unique to FinTech is the need for friction. For example, Betterment doesn’t make it especially easy to check your portfolio every day (even though some people want to) because it is better for financial health to only check periodically with a focus on the end goal. To this end, they have simple visual interface focused on progress towards a goal.

    We’ve watched participants spend 30 minutes struggling to link their bank account to their credit card and set up a unique password, then tell us they wouldn’t change a thing. They loved how secure the somewhat complicated process felt. Users need to trust that their information and money are in secure hands.

    User focus throughout the development process

    Successful FinTech gives users a better way to do something that might formerly have been difficult, tedious, or met with a sense of dread. It provides sense of security and control within the app that translates to feeling in control of their finances.

    To stand out and build loyalty in an increasingly crowded market, companies should incorporate a user focus throughout the development process. By talking to users to understand what they want and need, building products that enable customers to achieve their goals, and finally, talking to them again, watching them play with your app or experience the service and listening to their feedback, you’ll be on your way to delivering a product that wins hearts, minds, and importantly, repeat users.

    Amanda Weller is a Senior Lead of User Experience at GfK. To share your thoughts, email Amanda.weller@gfk.com or leave a comment below.

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  • GfK scoops double award for “Best Innovation” at MRS 2017 Awards
    • 12/05/17
    • Global
    • English

    GfK scoops double award for “Best Innovation” at MRS 2017 Awards

    GfK awarded both “Winner” and “Highly Commended” in the Research Live Award for Best Innovation. 

    • 11/30/17
    • Retail
    • Consumer Goods
    • Shopper
    • Global
    • English

    Turning omnishopping to omnibuying – the Amazon way

    Earlier this year, Amazon shook up the retail world with its acquisition of Whole Foods. What could the online giant and the high-end grocer possibly have in common – and how could they help each other?

    Our survey soon after the announcement showed that many consumers were already shopping from both retailers. Hopes were high for a cross-pollination of services and ideas; consumers’ wish lists included more high-tech devices in store and free grocery shipping for Amazon Prime members.

    These first-level priorities may take a while to fully develop, and some may never come to pass. So how does the Amazon/Whole Foods match square with the ways people are shopping today? Does the alliance make dollars and cents in the 2018 marketplace – as well as 2025 and beyond?

    The latest results from our annual FutureBuy® study provide a fresh impression of how people are searching for and buying products of all types; and our data show why Amazon’s big move into grocery may have been more than prescient. Here are four insights from FutureBuy that show how Amazon and Whole Foods can take their synergies to the next level.

       

    1. Omnichannel shopping rises in FMCG
    2.  

    Though the US has long trailed other regions in online shopping for everyday household items, American consumers are catching up. Four in 10 (40%) US shoppers said they used both in-store and online resources (“omnishopping”) to hunt for beauty and personal care products – up from 32% last year. We also saw notable omnishopping jumps in

       

    • Packaged-food and beverages: 23% (up from 14%)
    • OTC healthcare: 27% (up from 21%)
    • Household washing and cleaning products: 25% (up from 15%)
    •  

    If shoppers are ready to hunt for their daily home and personal needs online, then the worlds of Amazon and Whole Foods are already merging.

       

    1. “Webrooming” tops “showrooming”
    2.  

    According to the new FutureBuy, shoppers are almost twice as likely to search for a product online and then buy in a store (“webrooming”) as to research in-store and then buy online (“showrooming”). This means that being in both worlds – bricks and clicks – gives you a much better chance of capturing a sale, and of building brand recognition and trust throughout the purchase journey.

       

    1. Click & collect has a bright future
    2.  

    In the US, 40% of shoppers expect to rely on click and collect services – which allow in-person pickup of online purchases – more in the coming years. One in six (16%) shoppers is already using click and collect regularly, up more than 50% from last year (10%); and Generation Y (ages 27 to 36) is most likely to embrace the service, while Boomers are showing the slowest uptake. For groceries specifically, Gen Y is more likely to regularly use click and collect – and to report a higher anticipated use in the future. All of this evidence suggests that Whole Foods locations will grow in importance as pickup spots for Amazon purchases.

       

    1. Consumers warming to targeted ads
    2.  

    Though some remain skittish about data privacy, shoppers increasingly are embracing the perks of online tracking and targeting. More than four in ten (43%) say they like it when a website keeps track of their visits and recommends products – up from 35% last year. And almost one-third (30%) like it when retailers contact them on their smartphones when they are out shopping. With its in-store environment and rich data from online and in-person purchases alike, Amazon/Whole Foods will become the master of targeting across the bricks and clicks world.

    Of course, some services and ideas will not be truly proven until they are launched; then consumers can vote with their wallets. But from the perspective of today’s shopping mindset, the future belongs to Amazon’s new in-store/online hybrid.

    Joe Beier is EVP, Shopper & Retail Strategy at GfK.

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  • Purchasing power for watches and jewelry in New Zealand
    • 11/30/17
    • Press
    • Retail
    • Geomarketing
    • Geodata
    • Global
    • English

    Purchasing power for watches and jewelry in New Zealand

    Inhabitants of New Zealand have an average of approximately €100 per person for spending on watches and jewelry. This is one of the results of the study "GfK Purchasing Power for Retail Product Lines 2017," which is now available. But the purchasing power for watches and jewelry differs substantially from region to region.

  • German consumer climate stable at a good level
    • 11/28/17
    • Press
    • Global
    • English

    German consumer climate stable at a good level

    Findings of the GfK Consumer Climate study for November 2017.

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