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User Experience

User Experience (UX - gebruikerservaring)

Merken doen de hedendaagse consument grote beloftes. Om tegemoet te komen aan de veeleisende consument en om succesvol te zijn, moeten nieuwe producten en diensten bruikbaar, interessant en aantrekkelijk zijn. Consumenten moeten direct een goed gevoel krijgen bij het gebruik van een product. 

GfK's experts op het gebied van user experience (UX) helpen onze klanten om gebruikerservaringen in kaart te brengen en om zo bestaande of nieuwe producten en diensten te verbeteren.

Binnen de GfK User Experience worden fabrikanten vanaf het begin betrokken bij het ontwerpproces van hun producten waardoor de kans op een succesvolle productlancering wordt vergroot. We benutten in alle ontwikkelingsfasen inzichten van gebruikers; van het eerste concept en prototype tot de lancering en activiteiten daarna.

Op basis van onze bevindingen over de gebruikerservaring kunt u definitieve plannen opstellen over hoe u het best uw producten en diensten kunt onderscheiden of hoe u gebruik kunt maken van huidige marktkansen. We stellen u in staat om interessante en zinvolle ervaringen creëren, die leiden tot een hogere klanttevredenheid. 

UX Labs

GfK beschikt over verschillende UX labs, waarvan klanten uit verschillende markten gebruik kunnen maken. Onze UX labs voldoen aan al uw behoeften en kunnen worden gebruikt voor alle soorten onderzoek.

We beschikken zelfs over mobiele studio’s, waarmee we overal in de wereld inzichten over de gebruikservaring van klanten kunnen verzamelen.

UXalliance

Ons GfK UX team is medeoprichter van UXalliance, hét internationale user experience netwerk. Met wereldwijd meer dan 500 professionals, die gezamenlijk meer dan 30 talen spreken, krijgt u met UXalliance toegang tot experts met uitgebreide kennis van lokale markten.

Om ervoor te zorgen dat de rapportages vergelijkbaar zijn over verschillende landen, voldoen onze partners aan strikte kwaliteitsnormen en richtlijnen.

Verwante links:

UXalliance 

UX Masterclass halfjaarlijks congres

Laatste insights

Hier vind je de laatste insights voor user experience. Bekijk alle insights

    • 04/20/17
    • Travel and Hospitality
    • User Experience (UX)
    • Global
    • English

    Improving the user experience of a ticket machine interface

    We aimed to improve the user experience of Deutsche Bahn’s touchscreen user interface for customers, thereby improving the ticket- buying experience.
    • 04/06/17
    • User Experience (UX)
    • UX Design
    • UX Measurement
    • UX Strategy
    • Global
    • English

    GfK hosts 12th User Experience (UX) Masterclass in China

    GfK, in partnership with the UXalliance, will host the 12th User Experience (UX) Masterclass at the InterContinental Puxi in Shanghai on April 20.
    • 03/09/17
    • User Experience (UX)
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    How to define engaging experiences in self-driving cars

    Autonomous vehicles have the potential to disrupt everything we know about driving. Earlier this year, I attended a panel discussion regarding the advancements in autonomous driving at the 2017 Consumer and Electronics Show (CES). One conclusion from this session was that it is no longer a question of “if”, but “when” autonomous vehicles will become part of our lives.

    A blank canvas for auto manufacturers

    With no need for a steering wheel, accelerator, or brake pedals, the interior of a car becomes a blank canvas. So, how will companies shape this canvas while keeping the user at the forefront? For example, if a passenger wanted to work on their commute, a car could be customized into an office space with a desk and internet connection. Prefer to relax and recharge after a long day? A car could offer features like a massage chair or a big screen TV. And, in the case of ridesharing, a different car could be called up to fit the user’s mood. The car has the potential to become a “third-space”, a space to be used for more than a way to get to where you are going.

    Understanding the types of experiences consumers want

    UX research methods such as ethnography will help manufacturers understand what types of experiences consumers want to have in-car, and how to deliver them in a way that engages and delights. Ethnography helps designers, engineers, and researchers build empathy by taking them out of the lab and placing them in real world situations users face every day. We employ this approach to uncover insights while observing common tasks side-by-side with participants. This method uncovers behaviors and insights that wouldn’t be revealed in any other form of research, and allows us to truly see the world from the user’s perspective. These insights allow us to develop use-case scenarios and solutions that are both nuanced and relevant.

    Standing apart as the landscape evolves

    As the autonomous vehicle landscape evolves, manufacturers who are able to create truly exceptional in-car experiences will stand apart. The first step to delivering exceptional consumer experiences is understanding what consumers expect and need – and how they should be delivered. Through direct observation, ethnography has the power to uncover this. The question is, which auto manufacturer will be the first to get it right? hbspt.cta.load(2405078, 'dd7ac318-b881-41bc-b61d-84467be53b2d', {});
    • 01/06/17
    • Consumer Goods
    • User Experience (UX)
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    3 usability tips every appliance manufacturer should consider

    The household appliance industry has been particularly impacted by rapid-evolving technology and Connected Consumer innovations. Our user experience (UX) researchers and designers are fortunate to see and test many cool-looking prototypes that integrate these innovations before they hit the market. While we draw some of our insights from UX best practices and years of experience in UX design of appliances, having a set of benchmarks in our arsenal makes recommendations that much more powerful.

    Measuring UX in household appliance research

    We have integrated a UX measurement tool in household appliance research over several years resulting in a robust benchmark database. A scientifically-validated tool, the UX Score offers holistic insight by combining pragmatic usability aspects (learnability, operability) with hedonic qualities such as usefulness (identification, stimulation) and look and feel; this results in a score that can be compared to competitor products, different versions of the product, or, in the case of household appliances, benchmarked for the category. Our database includes years of global research covering diverse product categories from cooktops to freezers.

    Diving deeper into the individual dimensions of the UX Score

    While the overall benchmark UX Score for household appliances indicates a good user experience through its relatively high value (about 5 on a scale from 1=low  to 6=high), researchers are likely familiar with the following situation: A consumer is excited about a new idea and design, but once they attempt to use it, the disappointment surfaces. So we must dive deeper into the individual dimensions of the UX Score. Here we see the mean benchmark values by dimension for the UX Score of household appliances. Mean benchmark values of each dimension including overall benchmark (orange line) for household appliances In the “inspiration” and “look and feel” dimensions, we see high benchmark values compared to the overall benchmark line. This is fostered by continuous innovations through new functionalities that show a stimulating effect on the product experience as well as the high-quality impression. The more pragmatic “operability” dimension represents the lowest value by comparison. The location of features and information do not conform to consumer expectations. The “learnability” dimension value is also reduced – a catchy and intuitive usage of household appliances is limited.

    How to improve the user experience for household appliances

    Based on this benchmark data and UX best practices, we have established three tips for household appliance manufacturers to improve the user experience of their products:
    • Define functions and interaction design before constructing the physical interface.
      Thereby you can perfectly place functions exactly where users expect them to be. This works much better than placing the function anywhere and then trying to explain it with an icon.
    • Involve hardware designers as early as possible in the concept development process.
      Designers and hardware experts should work together as early as possible in the concept development and testing process. This will ensure the pragmatic, as well as, hedonic aspects will gain attention.
    • Opportunity of thin-film transistor (TFT) displays should not be overstrained – avoid abundance of functions.
      TFTs offer a great opportunity to explain functions. Although consumers are very familiar with the interactions via touch, too many gimmicks lead to confusion and disorientation. If no TFT is available it becomes even more essential to focus only on the most relevant functionalities. Self-explanatory icons should be found for other functions, which are then tested as early as possible (see point 1).
    As household appliance innovations continue to evolve, the strengths (hedonic qualities) seem to be well-considered. To address the category weaknesses like operability and learnability, appliance manufacturers should apply a holistic user experience design process to keep classic usability aspects top of mind. Lena Tetzlaff is a User Experience Consultant at GfK. Please email lena.tetzlaff@gfk.com to share your thoughts.
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