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Trends and Forecasting

Trends and Forecasting

Om uw concurrentie voor te blijven, heeft u de juiste informatie nodig. Wij beschikken over nauwkeurige trends en voorspellingen, krachtige analyses en de meest actuele koop- en marktrends. 

We leveren gedetailleerde prognoses van de consumentenvraag naar technologische apparaten, en geven inzicht in de wereldwijde technologische markttrends. 

Onze prognoses worden samengesteld met gebruik van 's werelds grootste steekproef van Point of Sales-data, gecombineerd met onze wereldwijde expertise en kennis van de lokale markt. Deze combinatie geeft onze klanten een unieke, nauwkeurige en tijdige prognose van de consumentenvraag. We bieden u inzicht in welke producten consumenten naar verwachting zullen kopen, in welke hoeveelheid, tegen welke prijs en via welk kanaal. 

Prognoses voor beleggers en kapitaalmarkten

Institutionele beleggers staan onder druk om te presteren. Om succesvol te zijn, hebben bedrijven zo vroeg mogelijk betrouwbaar inzicht nodig in de trends zodat ze weten waarin ze moeten investeren. 

We bieden beleggers krachtige prognoses op basis van wereldwijd Point of Sales-data. We voorspellen keerpunten in de consumentenvraag, verstrekken gedetailleerde bedrijfsanalyses van hardware-, software- en duurzame consumentengoederenbedrijven.

Dankzij onze betrouwbare prognoses kunnen beleggers succesvolle aanbevelingen doen. 

Laatste insights

Hier vind je de laatste insights voor trends en forecasting. Bekijk alle insights

    • 01/08/16
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Netherlands
    • Dutch

    Trends in Digital Media Entertainment Q4 - 2015 | Slipsheet

    Klik hier voor de slipsheet van Trends in Digital Media Entertainment.
    • 12/01/15
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Netherlands
    • Dutch

    Trends in Digital Media Entertainment Q2 - 2015 | Slipsheet

    Klik hier voor de slipsheet van Trends in Digital Media Entertainment
    • 02/01/18
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global
    • English

    Disrupting sports broadcasting: Hidden opportunities for sports streamers

    Winter has come for American sports fans in the best possible way, as this Sunday’s Super Bowl will be followed by two weeks of Olympic competition. I know I am not the only one eagerly awaiting live curling in the pre-dawn hours. Yet, as viewing habits change, more Americans will stream these events instead of watching them on a TV set. Younger generations are leading the streaming revolution; GfK MRI data shows that 70% of Millennials (+20 points from Americans overall) and 76% of Gen Now (+26 pts) used a streaming service like Netflix or Hulu in the last month. Streaming is essential to reach and engage younger sports fans, and Millennial sports fans in particular represent a tremendous opportunity for sports broadcasters and marketers. While 41% say they are willing to pay for sports content (+16 points from Americans overall and +12 points from sports fans overall), only eight percent currently pay for it. NBC is fully embracing streaming in February. There will be 11 hours of streaming content surrounding the Super Bowl, and for the first time the Olympic opening ceremony will be streamed live. NBC is not the only one going all in on streaming: this spring, ESPN Plus will go live, and in the fall, Turner Sports will place most of their UEFA Champions League soccer games on a new streaming service. Interestingly, teams are also shifting to streaming. In a groundbreaking partnership, MLS’s Los Angeles Football Club (LAFC) announced this week that YouTube TV will hold their local media rights. The move by LAFC and Turner Sports makes sense as soccer fans are more likely to use a streaming service than sports fans overall (57% vs 50%). While it’s clear that broadcasters are boosting the accessibility of streamed sports content to meet the needs of the market and capitalize on the sports rights they own, are they prepared to use engagement to keep fans coming back, and paying, for more? Research from GfK Consumer Life has identified a few ways to capture the opportunity that Millennial sports fans present.
    • Creating a conversation. Millennial sports fans value online communities, and 62% think that virtual interactions can be as good as in-person ones. So how can streaming outlets foster a community? E-sports platforms like Twitch are a great case study, as they allow online spectators to interact with each other and the players in real time. Perhaps TV networks can provide a way for fans to discuss the starting line-up and other key decisions in real time through their streaming services. 
    • Getting personal. Being able to customize the streaming experience will also help attract and keep Millennial sports fans, as 79% tend to prefer products that are tailored to their needs (+15 points from Americans overall). And personalization that integrates home technology and digital assistants would be even better, with Millennial sports fans being more likely to describe their home as a high tech zone (42%, +14 points from Americans overall) and 1 in 5 having a home assistant like Amazon Echo in their house. Perhaps in the future, Alexa can help tailor a viewing schedule for fans and I won’t have to go hunting to see what channel curling is on at 4 AM.
    The good news is that the engagement of Millennial sports fans can lead to advocacy. Sixty-two percent typically go out of their way to tell others about products and services they like, paving the way for future growth. While Millennials are a commonly decried as disruptors, they can truly lead the way to new revenue streams in the sports world and hopefully, a life-long relationship with teams and the content providers that connect them. Adam Swift is a Senior Analyst on the Consumer Life team at GfK. He can be reached at adam.swift@gfk.com.
    • 01/18/18
    • Technology
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global
    • English

    Xennials: An untapped opportunity for marketers

    Much has been written about US generations for, well, generations. Starting with the “Lost Generation” that fought in World War I right up to our present-day debates about what to call the Post-Millennial audience, Americans have an endless fascination with the differences between these seemingly distinct and roughly 20-year age groups. But as society and technology evolve at a faster rate than ever, perhaps the parameters for each generation will shrink over time? The “Xennial” generation is a term recently coined for those stuck sandwiched by Gen X and those industry killers, the Millennials. Born (roughly) between 1977 and 1983, this group is caught between two worlds in more ways than one. They grew up as technology did, learning to use computers and cell phones in their teen and college years. Many were hit hardest by the tech bust, 9/11, and the Great Recession, which happened at critical moments in their nascent careers. And they exhibit a curious mix of the cynicism of their Xer elders and the optimism of their younger counterparts. Recent research from GfK Consumer Life uncovers how Xennials serve as the bridge between the infinitely dissected Millennials and oft-neglected Generation X. A quick look at their outlooks on finance, technology, and the home spotlights a unique group worth taking more seriously.

    Confident and driven

    In spite of living through major financial instability, Xennials remain more financially bullish than their elders – and their juniors. GfK Consumer Life research shows that they’re most likely to believe that now is a good time to make purchases, feel that the US economy is fair in the opportunities it provides, and be satisfied with the amount of money they have to live on today. They also lead in the belief that the best place to put money is where it can generate income – not where it is simply the safest – and feel more strongly than adjacent age groups that being able to start your own business is still a part of the American Dream. In fact, thrift is a lower-ranked personal value for this micro-generation. Perhaps it’s this financial confidence that makes Xennials more content in other arenas. They’re more likely to express satisfaction with multiple aspects of life, from career and relationships to health and their social lives. And in their leisure time, they’re more apt than neighboring generations to prioritize both physical and mental challenges. Brands can leverage this outlook by providing Xennials with opportunities to try new things, take a few risks, and feel even more empowered.

    The technology tipping point

    Full disclosure: I am an Xennial (class of 1980), and nowhere is it more clear than in my relationship with technology. I had my first email account nearly a decade before my first cell phone. Today, I take full advantage of mobile technology, social media, and streaming services, but have yet to cut the cord, still subscribe to a few paper magazines, and Snapchat recently became the first app that instantly went over my head. However, I still wouldn’t hesitate to call myself tech-savvy. Our research at GfK Consumer Life shows a similar pattern. Xennials are more likely than Millennials and Gen Xers to see the technology they own as an expression of themselves, and you’re more likely to find innovative devices like fitness bands, VR/AR headsets, smart home appliances, 4K Ultra HDTVs in their homes. Yet many members of this unique audience still straddle the low-tech line, as they’re more apt to read magazines on a weekly basis and watch video content on something physical such as a DVD. For tech companies to effectively communicate with this group, these nuances are important to understand. “Retro releases” such as the return of the Nokia 3310 phone capitalize on this generation’s intermittent desire for simple technology – and nostalgia.

    Staying close to home

    Earlier in this century, young Americans began moving back in with their parents in greater numbers than ever before. And as of 2014, “living with parents” is now the most common living arrangement for 18-34-year-olds for the first time in the modern era. Perhaps as a consequence of this shift, Xennials today are more home- and family-centric than those both younger and older than they are. Compared to Millennials and Gen Xers, they’re more likely to describe their homes as a family haven, prioritize family bonding during their leisure time, and predict that they’ll be living close to family ten years from now. Interestingly, Xennials are also most apt – out of the three generations – to enjoy advertising that emphasizes the comforts of home, a clear message to marketers on where to direct their creative energies. Xennials index higher than their immediate age peers on regular at-home activities such as cooking and meal planning, but their homes also have a modern twist. They’re most likely to pay professionals to do chores to save time for themselves, and demonstrate greater interest in new home developments such as energy-efficient appliances and open floor plans. With an audience that’s more open to thinking about the home in new ways, there’s a host of new opportunities for marketers.

    The lesson for brands

    Only time will tell if the Xennials continue to differentiate themselves from those just a little older and younger than them, and if our perception of generations evolves to include narrower age ranges. But in the meantime, brands can learn powerful lessons about the needs of Americans born at a brief, pivotal time in our nation’s history. Rachel Bonsignore is a Senior Consultant on the Consumer Life team at GfK. She can be reached at rachel.bonsignore@gfk.com. hbspt.cta.load(2405078, '13e65c1f-147b-466d-a5ba-18657a8a6ae5', {});
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