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Young Shopper

The shopper of the future: How today’s young shoppers see tomorrow’s shopping experience

Find out how 16-21 year olds expect to be shopping in the future. We have undertaken a multi-country study of over 7,000 shoppers in Brazil, China, Germany, India, Italy, Russia, South Africa, South Korea, the UK and US to give retailers, manufacturers and distributors much needed insight into future shopper behavior. The Global Young Shopper Survey is an authoritative study that gives a glimpse of both the shops and shoppers of the future.

In this white paper we look at what those young people told us about their expectations for the physical store, the online shopping experience and what they hope to see from retailers in the future. 

 

Lastest Insights

Here you can find the latest insights about young shopper. To view all insights click here.

    • 12/02/15
    • Retail
    • Young Shopper
    • Global
    • English

    Young Shopper: All about UK’s young shoppers!

    Retailers need not be at all concerned about young people in the UK shunning “real” shops. According to our study, while almost half of youths (aged 16-21) believe shopping online will grow in importance in the next two years, 72% think they will use physical stores to research and buy products the same amount or more in two years’ time. Around the same proportion of adults (75% of those aged 22-65) think they will visit stores as much or more. However, young people are significantly more likely to say they will visit physical stores more than they do now (23% vs. 9% of the older age group), while older respondents are more likely to say they will use shops the same amount as they do now (66% vs. 49%).

    Social shopping is an important activity for the young

    Younger respondents anticipate they will shop socially more often in future (28% vs. 8% of older shoppers), while older shoppers are more likely to say they will shop socially the same amount as they do now (57% vs. 47% of youth).

    Webrooming wins over showrooming in the UK

    Consumers in the UK prefer to “webroom” – research an item online before going in-store. 76% of youths do this, as opposed to researching in-store and then buying online (55%). The adults surveyed showed the same trend for webrooming over showrooming.

    Online or in shops, what motivates consumers?

    Youths perceive it as a greater benefit for online stores to be attached to physical stores compared to the adults (73% vs. 60%). In addition, young people are significantly more likely to say they only buy from online stores that have physical stores as well (25% vs. 10% of adults). On the other hand, older respondents are more likely to say that they buy from the most convenient store/the one with the best offer, and that they don’t care if an online store has a physical presence (37% vs. 23% of youths).

    Differences in consumer behavior between youths and adults

    In some respects, youths and adults are very similar. Convenience is the most important factor for shopping in-store for groceries and personal care items. When shopping for mobiles and personal electronics, consumers are looking for information and expertise from staff. Shopping for fashion items in-store is valued the most as a social activity versus the other categories. Attitudinally, the youth group is more concerned with fashion and shopping as a social activity, while the adult group is more likely to enjoy shopping for groceries. Interestingly, the level of engagement in technology is relatively similar between adults and the youth. The young are more likely to enjoy shopping, to label themselves “shopaholics” and to find shopping less of a chore.

    Everybody likes to research purchases online, but youths use mobiles more

    16-21 year olds are significantly more likely to use mobiles to research or purchase products. When it comes to actually paying for goods, the majority of transactions take place in-store, with most online transactions completed using a desktop or laptop.

    Delivery costs put some consumers off online shopping

    The main barrier to shopping online in the UK is the cost of delivery, with young people more likely to say this than older respondents (57% vs. 47%). Equally, consumers will sometimes refrain from buying online because they want to try a product in-store – again, young people are the most likely to say this (42% vs. 34% of adults). More practical elements such as credit card security are of a slightly lower importance and less of a barrier to all consumers… Older respondents are more likely to say they have no reservations about shopping online (25% vs. 11%).

    Consumers want in-store and online services integrated

    Youths and adults have similar expectations of stores to integrate their in-store and online services, with the majority expecting that retailers will support them in-store even when the purchase was made online. Furthermore, youths are more likely to see the benefit of an online store having a physical outlet (73% vs. 60%).

    What shoppers think will be important in the future

    Hand-in-hand with the increased importance of online, youths think home delivery will be more important than today. There is however a big difference between older and younger consumers when it comes to what they see as important for the future. Youths are particularly interested in innovations such as Amazon drone, whereas adults are more likely to be interested in buying in-store and then having items delivered (49% vs. 39%). Looking to the future, besides lower prices, youths are looking for convenience, with both easier refunds and improved delivery services considered of high importance. Better delivery is more likely to be a priority for older people (41% vs. 50%). Mobile payments or contactless payments are least mentioned, but even so, 22% of youths and 18% of adults would like to see more payment options.

    About the Global Youth Retail study

    Global Youth Retail study is a GfK proprietary study carried out in 10 countries (US, UK, Germany, Italy, South Korea, Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa). The total sample of 7,266 people includes a boosted sample of c. 5,000 16–21 year olds. The study explores attitudes and behaviors across grocery, personal care, fashion, mobile and personal electronics. Global Youth Retail is a key component of GfK Future of Retail – market insights we provide based on best intelligence about the demand and expectations of today’s shoppers across all categories and markets. Bringing together sales facts, panel data and shopper research, we help generate the precise and future focused retail strategy you need for sustainable business success. For more information contact Matthias Rasztar at matthias.rasztar@gfk.com. For more information on our Young Shopper Study, check out our other posts: China – Germany – Brazil – Russia – South Africa – South Korea
    • 11/24/15
    • Retail
    • Young Shopper
    • Global
    • English

    Young Shopper: Online vs. in-store – how Italians youngsters shop

    Young people in Italy are certainly not going to abandon shopping in-store any time soon, despite their interest in the online world. Two thirds (66%) of youth respondents (aged 16-21) thought they would continue to shop in stores as much or more than they do at present. This is similar to the adult segment (aged 22-65), where 67% said they would continue to shop in-store as much or more than before.

    Social shopping is important to young Italians

    The young people of Italy are significantly more likely to go shopping socially in the future than their adult counterparts, with 28% saying they will shop socially more than they currently do compared to 18% of the older age group.

    Online vs. in-store: how Italians shop

    Consumers in Italy prefer to “webroom” – research an item online before going in-store. 64% do this as opposed to 55% who “showroom” – research in-store and then buy online. Lower prices, greater choice, easier returns/refunds and improved delivery services are all factors that Italians would like to see from retailers in the future. Youths are more likely than adults to only shop at online stores that also have physical shops. They are also more likely to say they almost only buy from online shops with physical stores. Older respondents say they see the benefit of buying from online stores with physical stores, but are happy to buy from online-only retailers (37% vs. 28%).

    The different attitudes of youths and adults

    Attitudinally, Italians place a high importance on looking good, with adults more likely than youths to pay a premium for fashion/cosmetics products. Both age groups are likely to browse even if they don’t have a product in mind, and around a quarter will buy fashion items on impulse. Both age groups place a high importance on keeping up-to-date with technology trends, though adults are more concerned with actually owning the latest technology than youths. Between youth and adult groups enjoyment of shopping is equal, with a similar number seeing shopping as enjoyable/a hobby or conversely seeing shopping as a chore. Adults are more likely to admit to being a “shopaholic”.

    Italian youths shop more than other age groups on mobile

    Of the devices used to research the purchase, the use of mobile phones is consistently higher amongst youths, and laptop/desktop use is higher amongst adults. When it came to paying, the majority of transactions took place in-store.

    Delivery costs, reliability and security concern young people about online

    Integrated online and in-store experiences are important in Italy, with around two thirds of 16-21 year olds and more than half of adults expecting it. The main barrier to shopping online in Italy is cost of delivery. Reliability of delivery is a bigger concern for 16-21 year olds than it is for adults, as is the security of credit card and personal details. One third of those aged 22-65 have no reservations about shopping online, compared to 19% of younger people.

    The future for shopping in Italy

    In Italy, both youths and adults feel that online, home delivery, mobile/app and Click & Collect will increase in importance in the next two years. Youths are very interested in seeing Amazon drones in the future (54%), significantly more so than their adult counterparts (44%). Customization would also be valuable to both groups, as would the option of having products bought in-store delivered to the home. Older respondents are significantly more likely to say that Click & Collect would be valuable (44% vs. 28%).

    About the Global Youth Retail study

    Global Youth Retail study is a GfK proprietary study carried out in 10 countries (US, UK, Germany, Italy, South Korea, Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa). The total sample of 7,266 people includes a boosted sample of c. 5,000 16–21 year olds. The study explores attitudes and behaviors across grocery, personal care, fashion, mobile and personal electronics. Global Youth Retail is a key component of GfK Future of Retail – market insights we provide based on best intelligence about the demand and expectations of today’s shoppers across all categories and markets. Bringing together sales facts, panel data and shopper research, we help generate the precise and future focused retail strategy you need for sustainable business success. For more information contact Matthias Rasztar at matthias.rasztar@gfk.com. For more information on our Young Shopper Study, check out our other posts: China – Germany – Brazil – Russia – South Africa – South Korea
    • 11/12/15
    • Retail
    • Young Shopper
    • Global
    • English

    Young Shopper: How India’s youths wants to shop!

    The youths of India remain loyal to shopping in person. 78% of young people surveyed said they will continue to shop in-store at least to the same extent as now or more, compared to 69% of older shoppers. In fact, 51% of youths said they will visit shops more. This is significantly more than the older age group (22-65 year olds), where only 28% said they will use shops more. Physical shops are seen to give credibility to retailers in India, particularly by youths: 44% of young people and 32% of the older age group state that they only buy from online shops that also have physical stores.

    Shopping socially matters to young people in India

    Social shopping looks set to increase in India, with more than half of young shoppers (56%) saying they would shop socially more often in future compared to 32% of adults. Overall, 88% of youths and 73% of adults say they will shop socially the same amount or more than they do now.

    Consumers research first, then visit stores

    Youths prefer to “webroom” – research an item online before going in-store. 86% do this as opposed to 73% who “showroom” – research in-store and then buy online. Adults also prefer to webroom – 83% do this as opposed to 68% who showroom.

    What’s important to consumers when they shop

    Overall, lower prices and improved delivery were most important to all age groups when they shop. However, lower prices, easier refunds/returns, improved service, greater choice and more omnichannel options were more important to older respondents.

    Most online shopping in India takes place on laptops or desktops

    Of the devices used to research the purchase, mobile, tablet and desktop use is similar between youths and adults in India, although use of mobile phones is consistently higher among youths when it comes to groceries. When it comes to paying online, the majority of online transactions take place on a desktop or laptop.

    Credit card security deters consumers from online shopping

    60% of youths and 46% of 22-65 year olds list security of their credit card or personal details as the main reason they would not buy online, while 39% of both age groups give cost of delivery as the reason.

    Expectations of an integrated experience

    Indian youths have higher expectations concerning the integration of online and in-store services. 70% of youths expect support in-store if they have bought online, compared to 63% of adults.

    Different shopping habits of the different age groups

    According to our survey, adults are more conscious of the ingredients in the food they eat, and enjoy grocery shopping more than youths. Young people are more likely to buy fashion items online, and state that they shop less often but spend more when they do.

    What the future holds

    Youths and adults in India both think home delivery, online and mobile and app will play a more important role in several years’ time than today. Indians of all age groups are very interested in new technologies – in particular Amazon drones, personalized products and mobile wallet – like shoppers in the UK, Germany and Russia. Adults place slightly more importance on purchasing products in-store and having them delivered, avoiding the need to carry them home. On the other hand, youths show more interest in Google Glass (41% of youths surveyed as compared to 33% of adults).

    About the Global Youth Retail study

    Global Youth Retail study is a GfK proprietary study carried out in 10 countries (US, UK, Germany, Italy, South Korea, Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa). The total sample of 7,266 people includes a boosted sample of c. 5,000 16–21 year olds. The study explores attitudes and behaviors across grocery, personal care, fashion, mobile and personal electronics. Global Youth Retail is a key component of GfK Future of Retail – market insights we provide based on best intelligence about the demand and expectations of today’s shoppers across all categories and markets. Bringing together sales facts, panel data and shopper research, we help generate the precise and future focused retail strategy you need for sustainable business success. For more information contact Matthias Rasztar at matthias.rasztar@gfk.com.
    • 10/23/15
    • Retail
    • Young Shopper
    • Global
    • English

    Young Shopper: What young shoppers in South Africa expect from retailers!

    Our survey shows that visiting shops is not something that the majority of young people in South Africa are going to stop doing in the future. In fact, just over one third (35%) anticipate using physical stores more often in future to research and purchase products, compared to 19% of older shoppers. In contrast 31% of older shoppers say they will use physical stores less, compared to 20% of young shoppers. A physical presence seems to be important to youths who shop online as 37% (as opposed to 23% of adults) state that they only shop at online stores that also have physical shops. While more than one in ten youths in South Africa say they will stop using physical stores altogether, more than one quarter state that they do not buy online at all (26%). This is notably higher than in other markets (for example, 6% in Italy, 1% in China and 4% in the UK).

    Social shopping matters more to the young in South Africa

    Young South Africans are more likely to go shopping socially in the future than their adult counterparts (38% vs. 21% of older shoppers). The proportion of each group who plan to shop socially however is similar.

    Showrooming versus webrooming

    Consumers of all ages in South Africa prefer to “webroom” – research an item online before going in-store. 60% do this as opposed to 43% who “showroom” – research in-store before buying online.

    What do consumers want from retailers?

    Lower prices tops the wish list for South African shoppers, followed by more choice and easier refunds/returns. Having a wide choice matters more to youths – 62% compared to 48% of adults. Older shoppers are much more concerned about improved customer and delivery services, as well as more loyalty cards: 50% of 22-65 year olds would like more loyalty cards, whereas only 36% of 16-21 year olds had this on their wish list.

    Devices used when researching purchasing and paying for online shopping

    Devices used for research do not vary significantly by age across the categories; tablets are the least used device, with PC slightly more popular than mobile. When it came to paying, the large majority of transactions happen in-store for both groceries and fashion. When buying a mobile the split is slightly more even, with more than a third of purchases taking place online.

    Security concerns are South Africa’s biggest “barrier” to shopping online

    The main barrier to shopping online in South Africa is concern about the security of credit card and personal details. Cost of delivery is also an issue for all ages, whilst youths are significantly more concerned about the reliability of delivery. Meanwhile, adults are more worried about the difficulty of returning items.

    Integrated offers are important for older shoppers

    Adults have higher expectations concerning the integration of online and in-store services. For instance, 66% of older shoppers expect retailers to provide in-store support for products purchased online, compared to 59% of youths. Retailers who do not have a physical store presence could lose out when considering that one in five youths say they would only buy in-store.

    The future of shopping in South Africa

    Both the 16-21 year old age group and the 22-65 year old age group think that home delivery, online, and mobile/app will be important in the next few years, though adults feel significantly more strongly about home delivery. Customization of products is very important to all age groups in South Africa, with over half stating that this would be valuable to them in the future. Click & Collect is also a popular idea amongst both groups, although more so amongst adults, and both groups are interested in the idea of mobile wallet as a means of making payments.

    About the Global Youth Retail study

    Global Youth Retail study is a GfK proprietary study carried out in 10 countries (US, UK, Germany, Italy, South Korea, Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa). The total sample of 7,266 people includes a boosted sample of c. 5,000 16–21 year olds. The study explores attitudes and behaviors across grocery, personal care, fashion, mobile and personal electronics. Global Youth Retail is a key component of GfK Future of Retail – market insights we provide based on best intelligence about the demand and expectations of today’s shoppers across all categories and markets. Bringing together sales facts, panel data and shopper research, we help generate the precise and future focused retail strategy you need for sustainable business success. For more information contact Matthias Rasztar at matthias.rasztar@gfk.com.
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