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    • 09/18/17
    • Press
    • Geomarketing
    • Geodata
    • Digital Maps
    • Digital Maps
    • Global
    • English

    GfK releases new maps for Russia

    GfK recently updated its digital maps of Russia. The maps offer up-to-date coverage of the boundaries of Russia's administrative and postal regions. As such, they provide a reliable foundation for geographic analyses of market and company operations across all industries.
    • 09/15/17
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global
    • English

    Consumers are stressed, but confident: Surprising results from our Mood of the World 2017 study

    “I read the news today, oh boy”, John Lennon wrote this in 1967, but it seems every more appropriate today.  The news alert goes off on your mobile, and you think – what has happened now?  Terrorism?  Natural disaster?  North Korea?  Do you wonder how this seemingly constant barrage of anxiety-producing news is impacting people around the world? At GfK Consumer Life, every year since 1997, we conduct a survey of people all around the globe.  Many of the questions we ask have been asked for the past 20 years.  This gives us a unique perspective on how people are feeling today and reacting to the world around them.  These insights are used by global businesses and organizations to help them understand how their target markets are evolving, help them develop new products and services, and create more effective and relevant messaging. Our 2017 study is just out of the field and we’ve learned some interesting things about how people are reacting and adapting to the world around them.

    Consumers feeling stressed

    One of the things we’ve found is that people are reporting higher levels of stress.  This probably isn’t all that surprising, but the magnitude of the increase is nonetheless pretty startling.  91% of global respondents in our study report they find at least one of 14 problems to be a cause of stress in their life, and that number is up 20 points since 2015.  But it is not just the problems of the outside world that are stressing us out.  Stress is also coming from the pressure we are putting on ourselves, our health and day-to-day finances.

    Confidence still high

    Yet what is interesting about this stress is that it doesn’t appear to be dimming global consumer confidence.  Seven out of ten global consumers feel that they will be better off financially in the next 12 months – a number that has been quite steady globally since 2014 (and indeed, just a little bit better than where we were in 2016). Perhaps this is because despite all the talk about division and polarization, in many ways, people around the world are more alike than they have ever been.  Proliferation of mobile devices enables similar, on-the-go lifestyles.  Globally, our data shows that people feel less constrained by societal expectations related to gender and age.  Increasing global urbanization means that there are converging urban lifestyles.  Let’s face it, being late for work because you got stuck in traffic is just as frustrating whether that traffic is in Mexico City, Shanghai, or New York.

    Conclusion

    Expectations, or more specifically, rising expectations – that people have of themselves, of the products they use and the brands they buy – are contributing to both increased stress levels and sustained consumer confidence.  The fact that these two dynamics are happening at the same time is truly new news. Kathy Sheehan is Executive Vice President and General Manager of GfK’s Consumer Trends team. She can be reached at kathy.sheehan@gfk.com. hbspt.cta.load(2405078, 'fb44dca3-5899-4ef0-8edc-25a8ee2daec4', {});
    • 09/14/17
    • Press
    • Global
    • English

    GfK researcher Alexandra Chirilov wins ESOMAR award for VR approach

    GfK has won this year's ESOMAR Corporate Young Professional Award. 
    • 09/14/17
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Global
    • English

    A rising SVOD tide may not raise subscription prices

    With the number of subscription video on demand (SVOD) services growing, and existing ones getting frequent enhancements, media stakeholders have to wonder when “enough” will become “too much”. How many of these services will consumers subscribe to, and how much will they pay? Is there a road to profitability for market leaders who are investing millions in original content and exclusive licensing?

    Movement in the marketplace

    In the past year, signs of the SVOD market’s vitality have been easy to spot. There are new offerings – some smaller (Britbox) and some larger (Sling TV). A recent entrant, CBS All Access, is finally readying for its likely reason for being – the launch this fall of the streaming-only Star Trek: Discovery series. Among the Big 3 SVOD services, we’ve seen enhancements by Hulu, which added ad-free and live-TV subscription options. Amazon expanded its originals and will offer streaming of NFL games in the coming season. Market-leader Netflix seems to have scaled back its ambitions, opting for more curation and showing a willingness to cut ties with expensive but less-successful originals (The Get Down and Sense8). And the big recent news hanging over this entire market is Disney’s announcement that it will launch its own SVOD service and pull back its licensed content from other SVOD players – a double whammy for established players in the space.

    How much are subscribers willing to pay?

    We can gain some insight into the SVOD marketplace – at least for the Big 3 SVOD services – by looking at the eighth annual Over-the-Top TV report from GfK’s The Home Technology Monitor™. First, we see that the proportion of Netflix subscribers who also subscribe to either Amazon Prime Video or to Hulu – those that are multiple subscribers – has doubled in the past three years, from 10 percent in 2014 to 21 percent in 2017. The good news: We have proof that consumers are open to having more than one paid streaming service. But, on the downside, this may squeeze the amount they are willing to pay for each. The most interesting insight comes from our tracking since 2014 of perceived value for each of the Big 3 services. Measured in 2014, 2016, and 2017, we asked regular users of each service what was the maximum they would pay per month for that service. As we noted in 2016, and now see again in this year’s data, there is very strong indication for a “natural limit” of about $11 per month for any SVOD service. With standard service currently costing $9.99 a month for Netflix, $7.99 ($11.99 ad-free) for Hulu, and $8.25 for Amazon, we can again see there is good news (all are valued higher than their actual costs) mixed with bad (there is little room for additional subscription price increases). In particular, Netflix appears most vulnerable. Their standard service is already priced at 92 percent of the maximum price (compared with Amazon at 86% and Hulu at 79%). Also, Netflix’s perceived value showed no change in the past 16 months, while Amazon and Hulu scored positive (albeit small) momentum. Add in the consumer budget squeeze from the increase in multiple SVOD subscriptions, and the days of being able to easily run up revenues through subscription increases may be over.

    Altering the business model?

    While Hulu has advertising as a second revenue stream, Amazon has both very deep pockets and a raft of additional benefits from being a Prime member (shipping, music, e-books, etc.) – perks that Netflix lacks. Netflix’s ability to offset an increasing mountain of debt[1] may be limited by its current business model; it may, at some point, need to consider advertising, program sponsorships, or other streams of revenue in order to make Wall Street happy. Pricing aside, many other aspects of SVOD services need to be explored in the future as these services proliferate. What is the total budget for streaming and/or pay TV? How does the wide choice of services fit together? How can services avoid monthly, seasonal, or program-related churn? And, perhaps most importantly, how can consumers easily find their way to the content they want to watch across these multiple platforms? We look forward to partnering with our clients to further explore this space and help drive successful business outcomes. Get similar insights – and many more – as soon as they get published by subscribing to The Home Technology Monitor™ in 2017. Aside from the Over-the-Top TV 2017 report, our reports this year include our annual Ownership and Trend Report, Commanding Media (voice commands), TV Everywhere, and SVOD Digital Journey. [1] “Netflix is on the hook for $20 billion. Can it keep spending its way to success?”, Los Angeles Times, July 29 2017. http://www.latimes.com/business/hollywood/la-fi-ct-netflix-debt-spending-20170729-story.html hbspt.cta.load(2405078, '9e81766d-3de3-4a41-b18f-755b81cf461d', {});
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