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  • Binge Watching in Belgium
    • 08/30/16
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Digital Market Intelligence
    • Belgium
    • English

    Binge Watching in Belgium

    Binge-watching is defined as watching three or more episodes of a TV show in one day. 56% of Belgian consumers admit to binge-watching on a monthly basis, while 1 in 3 admits to doing this even weekly.

    • 08/29/16
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Can smart TV apps be monetized?

     

     

     

    With strong sales of smart TVs come new opportunities for brands and advertisers to communicate with a growing and engaged audience. But to monetize a channel, we need reliable measurements for reach, ad performance and engagement. At Germany’s dmexco, one of the most important global conferences of the digital economy, we’ll be discussing our passive monitoring approach to tracking content and ads across all devices, including the smart TV, at an individual level.

    A growing opportunity to reach consumers

    Smart devices are dominating sales in the TV market. Let’s take Germany, where four in ten households have a smart TV, as an example. In the first six months of 2016, 61.5% of all sets sold in Germany had smart TV functionality. Although TV isn’t a new technology, the new features of smart TVs and ultra-high-definition TVs (4k) are driving sales in the market (in addition to important sporting events, such as the Euro Cup this year).

    There’s clearly a growing opportunity for brands, retailers and content providers to reach consumers through smart TVs and, in particular, through apps on smart TVs. The key question is: can smart TV apps be monetized through advertising? If this is to happen, two aspects are critical.

    Monetization and Measurement

    Monetization will only work if apps are used. And apps will only be used if user experience and content are meeting consumers’ needs. We now know that you can’t simply transfer content from your website to mobile and have it appeal to visitors. It needs to be adapted. The same is true of smart TV apps.

    As we’ve seen with other new technology, advertising spend on a new media channel will only reach a critical mass once advertisers can measure the medium and thus understand the ROI of that spend. That’s why we’re investing in tools to measure the effectiveness and efficiency of advertising on smart TV apps.

    In my session at dmexco, I’ll share how to develop successful smart TV apps, and how we plan to passively measure the reach of smart TV apps for those who want to build brands, sell advertising, serve content and sell direct to viewers.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    To discuss further with Tilman, please join us at stand 8.1/A10 on 15 September at 11:00 to hear our Expert Talk

     

     

     

    Register for GfK Expert Talks at dmexco

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    • 08/24/16
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Technology
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Is ad tech butchering your user? How to regain control!

    Whatever your digital advertising/marketing objective, one thing is certain, it will involve data. Lots of it. Increasingly, the challenge for today’s executives is not only to make sense of that data, but also to leverage it consistently. To do this, it’s necessary to choose the right tools and platforms to maximize this knowledge. It’s therefore frustrating when those platforms can’t be integrated, when you can’t bring your own data together to activate it, when your ad tech providers try to have full control on the value chain. I describe this as being a hostage to your own ad tech stack.

    Ad tech often prevents from leveraging the complete picture

    Having a background in the ad tech sector and in digital publishing, I know only too well the frustrations of navigating and manipulating rich customer data. Sophisticated as the myriad of available ad tech platforms are, they have their limitations too. A platform leveraging only the last three web pages a visitor browsed (or actions taken within an app), for example, could be helpful in the context of the other information you hold about that very user, but… it’s not always the case. While you, no doubt, collect intelligence on your programmatic campaigns, email marketing actions, content consumption, ecommerce transactions, etcetera, this information is often sidelined by your ad tech providers, preventing you from leveraging the complete view of information you hold about your user.

    Build a single customer view to maximize your own data strategy

    The answer is to regain control of your own data strategy first, but also fully own the way it is actioned, and that’s what I’ll be talking about at Dmexco this year. Building a single customer view is key to success. It can go beyond your own rich data sets to incorporate your proprietary sources such as purchase data and cross-media usage. We work with our clients to understand what data they have and what data they need to build a deep, single view of the user that meets their requirements.

    Realize the full potential of customer data

    Taking a macro lens to this issue, I believe it’s time for the ad tech industry to collaborate more closely with each other to benefit their clients and make leveraging the single customer view a reality rather than a marketing stunt. End users want this integrated solution, so it’s time for some flexibility and ingenuity to help the sector deliver this. Now is the time for openness, transparency and co-operation, and for assigning murky ad tech with selfish agendas to the past. The opportunity for the future is in freeing customer data to help businesses realize their full potential. Only then will you no longer be a hostage to fragmented data and ad tech will fully become a facilitating element.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    To discuss further with Alessandro, please join us at stand 8.1/A10 on September 14 at 1pm to hear our Expert Talk

     

     

     

    Register for GfK Expert Talks at dmexco

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Celebrity Tribute Covers Have Mixed Success in Boosting Print Magazine Readership
    • 08/24/16
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • StarchMetrix
    • United States
    • English

    Celebrity Tribute Covers Have Mixed Success in Boosting Print Magazine Readership

    Print magazines featuring tributes to celebrities or public figures can deliver a large spike in readership compared to typical issues of the same titles – but the results vary widely.

    • 08/23/16
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Understanding TV viewing preferences in the digital age

    Today, the definition of “television” is much deeper than the physical device it was originally named for.  No longer confined to a self-contained, standard-issue product, “TV” now refers to content that is accessible to us via an endless combination of devices, platforms, and services.  The landscape is more complex than ever – we can watch TV on phones and through video game consoles, and make calls or summon personal assistants through our TV sets.  Antennas are a relic of the past, and we don’t even need a cable subscription to watch our favorite shows.  The most popular online video content is often much shorter than a traditional 30-second broadcast spot.  And although the fall TV premiere season is around the corner, the idea of a “TV season” is becoming fuzzier with each passing day.

    One thing is certain, however – our interest in TV-like content isn’t going anywhere.  According to Nielsen, Americans now consume an entire hour more of media per day than just a year ago.  So what are the new opportunities for this evolving industry?

    Address shorter attention spans

    It’s no secret that our multi-tasking culture has made it harder to pay attention to just one thing – in fact, experts estimate that our focused attention spans have decreased from 12 to 8 seconds in the past 15 years.  According to GfK Consumer Life, Americans are more than twice as likely to watch short video clips as movies/TV shows via streaming services on their smartphones in an average month.

    And as a sign of these times, Snapchat passed Twitter in daily users earlier this summer.  Consumer appetite for shorter bursts of entertainment is only going to intensify, creating a mandate for advertisers and content creators.

    Pepsi has responded to this trend by developing five-second broadcast ads to support its latest emoji campaign, appealing to the viewer’s dual desire for more visual communications and fast, dynamic content.  And it was recently announced that major network shows like “The Voice” and “Saturday Night Live” will be producing original shows for Snapchat.  What will your brand do to adapt?

    The rules of real-time

    Despite the flexibility of viewing times that the new TV landscape affords, live programming has not completely lost its appeal.  Recent findings from GfK Consumer Life show that two in three Americans consumed video content live or in real-time in the last 30 days, well ahead of those who time-shifted with streaming or recorded content.  And when they’re in the mood for sports or news but don’t have anything specific in mind, more than half of consumers turn first to their favorite TV network or channel.

    While the success of broadcast scripted programs continues to be a challenge, real-time content such as sports, competition series, and musical specials are still a safe bet.  And while this is good news for TV programmers and advertisers, it still takes effort to capture consumer attention – whether it’s embracing new technologies like virtual/augmented reality or enhancing the social media experience during live viewing “events.”

    Adapt to new viewing behaviors

    At the recent Television Critic’s Association press tour, NBCUniversal unveiled new research confirming that TV viewing is consistently pushed back among many viewers.  Delayed consumption is the new normal for scripted programs, as most viewers find it unnecessary to watch new episodes of shows when they first air.  Instead, they prefer to pick their own preferred time even when live viewing fits into their schedules.  Many would also watch more TV if an entire season was available to them at once instead of the standard five episodes that on-demand channels typically offer – this has actually become a deal-breaker for most.

    GfK Consumer Life data supports this preference – over half of Americans watch TV programming when it’s convenient to them on a streaming service (54%) or DVR (51%) monthly or more often.  With traditional advertising models still based on three or seven days within an episode airing, brands and broadcasters need to evolve their offerings to meet consumer demand.

    Conclusion

    As streaming services, technology disruptors, and other unpredictable shifts continue to push the TV world into uncharted territory, brands and content developers need to act quickly to capitalize on changing consumer preferences.  Understanding their desires to view more “snackable” content, enhance the live viewing experience, and watch on their own terms is essential for the future of TV.

    Rachel Bonsignore is a Senior Consultant for GfK Consumer Life.  She can be reached at rachel.bonsignore@gfk.com.

  • Home Technology: Physical Vs. Digital Video
    • 08/22/16
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • United States
    • English

    Home Technology: Physical Vs. Digital Video

    With so much content now available at will via online and subscription video services, ownership and renting of individual titles has become surprisingly rare, according to a new study from GfK.

  • Buying, Renting Videos by Title Is Not Making the Leap to the Digital Marketplace
    • 08/22/16
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Technology
    • Media Measurement
    • United States
    • English

    Buying, Renting Videos by Title Is Not Making the Leap to the Digital Marketplace

    With so much content now available at will via online and subscription video services, ownership and renting of individual titles has become surprisingly rare, according to a new study from GfK.

  • In 6th NextGen Competition, GfK Prompts Undergraduates to Research Brand Relationships, Product Innovation, “Omnishopping”
    • 08/17/16
    • Media and Entertainment
    • GfK-MRI
    • United States
    • English

    In 6th NextGen Competition, GfK Prompts Undergraduates to Research Brand Relationships, Product Innovation, “Omnishopping”

    In its 6th Next Generation (“NextGen”) Competition, GfK is encouraging undergraduate students to design and execute research on top-of-mind issues for today’s marketers – from the “out of box” experience to brand loyalty to “omnishopping.”

  • Providing comprehensive product information for a hi-fi publication
    • 08/16/16
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Product Catalogs
    • Global
    • English

    Providing comprehensive product information for a hi-fi publication

    Our catalog enables our client to offer comprehensive and authoritative product listings through its online publications.

  • Providing comprehensive product information for a hi-fi publication
    • 08/16/16
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Product Catalogs
    • United Kingdom
    • English

    Providing comprehensive product information for a hi-fi publication

    Our catalog enables our client to offer comprehensive and authoritative product listings through its online publications.

  • Providing comprehensive product information for a hi-fi publication
    • 08/16/16
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Product Catalogs
    • United States
    • English

    Providing comprehensive product information for a hi-fi publication

    Our catalog enables our client to offer comprehensive and authoritative product listings through its online publications.

    • 08/15/16
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Using Appreciation Panels to check TV audiences’ views

    Let’s be honest: it is complicated being an audience researcher for a broadcaster. Gone are the days when most prime time TV shows got double-digit ratings and the only reviews to worry about were those of the notoriously cynical newspaper journalist. Now, when a new TV program disappoints, thousands of people can share their own negative opinions about it on social media, in discussion forums or on the show’s website. But are these opinions representative of the entire audience’s appreciation of the relevant piece of content?

    In short, no. Broadcasters should not assume those views shared online are representative of the wider audience, or see them as explaining why a program is underperforming. There are many reasons for poor ratings, including scheduling and marketing.

    Check the audiences’ opinions… constantly!

    As you’ll know only too well, audience reactions to content change over time. Not only must you keep a constant check on audience opinions, but you’ll want to benchmark your content’s performance against similar programs. And you need to do this with a real audience. It’s crucial to do this with real viewers who watch programs every day of the week – not just with a group of people who are vocal on social media. We call these “Appreciation Panels”.

    Appreciation Panels = real viewers + real feedback

    Impossible? Not necessarily. With Appreciation Panels, you can obtain daily feedback from real viewers in a specified market. Using a short online survey, you can anonymously poll a representative group of respondents on anything they’ve watched in a given day.

    In just a few minutes, panel members will reveal what programs they’ve watched, what they liked or disliked about them, or what could have been improved. Some panel members even write mini essays on their favorite show. Others provide raw, honest feedback on why watching a particular program was a waste of their time.

    Shortly after the broadcast, you can dive into this treasure trove of information. By asking panel members to rate the program on a scale of one to ten, you are provided with a key indicator of whether or not a show is healthy and successful. But this is only one of the many questions that can be asked. If it’s a drama series you’re researching, you can ask the audience about the actors or storyline. If your focus is a news program, you could ask about the topics covered and the presentation style. Asking panelists about what they liked and what could be improved is always beneficial too.

    Is relevant audience research a guarantee for success?

    Knowing all of this about a program is no guarantee that it will be a success. Creating successful TV content – whether a news program or drama series – is not simply dependent on following up on audience feedback. However, it can prevent directors and producers from overlooking essential adjustments that could help to improve a program. And it can help channel planners determine if a program is targeting the right audience at the right time, or if it is a failure and should be taken off the air. Additionally, it can highlight when a program is eliciting positive viewer reactions but lacking high TV ratings, indicating that it might benefit from modifications to how it is promoted.

    Audience research is a powerful tool. One that can be used across media – TV, radio and even websites – to improve content and programing. The key to harnessing its power, however, lies in ensuring you are working with a Content Appreciation Panel that is representative of your target audience.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Find out more about our Content Appreciation Solution

     

     

     

    Understand the benefits

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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