Möchten Sie zur deutschen Seite wechseln?JaNeina
Close

Insights

clear all filters
  • Building better relationships with young pharmacists
    • 07/31/15
    • Health
    • Digital Market Intelligence
    • Belgium
    • English

    Building better relationships with young pharmacists

    We recruited more than 100 working pharmacists in the target age group to participate in a longitudinal integrated study.

  • Building better relationships with young pharmacists
    • 07/31/15
    • Health
    • Digital Market Intelligence
    • Singapore
    • English

    Building better relationships with young pharmacists

    We recruited more than 100 working pharmacists in the target age group to participate in a longitudinal integrated study.

  • Building better relationships with young pharmacists
    • 07/31/15
    • Health
    • Digital Market Intelligence
    • United Kingdom
    • English

    Building better relationships with young pharmacists

    We recruited more than 100 working pharmacists in the target age group to participate in a longitudinal integrated study.

    • 07/28/15
    • Health
    • Technology
    • User Experience (UX)
    • Global
    • English

    Four things you need to know about human factors validation for your mobile app

    Whether it’s breathing new life into aging patents or capitalizing on the quantified self craze, pharmaceutical companies are finding ways to expand the reach and utility of their drug brands by developing digital companion applications that track, monitor, log, and calculate therapeutic data. If you are a product manager considering developing an app for that, you know that the app may be subject to some of the same human factors regulatory requirements that drug delivery systems must meet.

    Given the simplicity of the tasks and the supporting visual design in many of these apps, it can be shocking to realize just how much effort and coordination goes into planning and preparation for a human factors validation test, especially where the perceived risk of harm is slim to none. After all, it’s software, not a device, right? Wrong. If the software provides information or data used to make decisions about administration of care, there is a good chance human factors and risk will be assessed similarly to a medical device. It’s true that rigorous attention to detail is required to create and adhere to a robust and effective human factors validation protocol. But it’s not impossible! Here are four common stumbling blocks, and how to avoid making mountains out of molehills.

    Before you start:

       

    1. Know how it’s done IRL (in real life): Consider instances where the official prescribing information may differ from the rules of thumb employed by real people. We’ve seen cases where the app design was bound by specifications in the prescribing information related to upper and lower limits and injection rotation specifications. However, in testing we discovered that real doctors, nurses, and patients tended to bend these rules according to their own personal circumstances and clinical opinions. If the app is rigid and won’t accommodate/ doesn’t reflect real use scenarios, not only will it be confusing and frustrating, it may be entirely unusable.
    2.  

     

       

    1. Don’t just automate—provide a service. Make sure there is clear value in the utility of the app that is greater than the effort required to seek out, download, and learn to use it. If a dosing app designed for nurses is just multiplying some number by two, an operation that can almost always be done in the head, why would they use an app for it? If the interface visualizes data in irrelevant ways, how will it support decision making? No one wants to see participants asking “why should I care about this?” in their validation study.
    2. Understand the risk of harm. The FDA is primarily concerned with patient safety. Think through and analyze the potential risks to the user associated with unintentional misuse of the app. The potential harm that could befall someone who miscalculates or misinterprets a recommended insulin dose is far more obvious than the potential harm that could befall someone who misreads an injection rotation diagram, but it’s still the manufacturer’s responsibility to conduct due diligence and determine the level of criticality associated with foreseeable user errors. With criticality defined and mapped onto a task analysis, the next step is to carefully define essential and critical tasks in your study protocol and spell out in detail the conditions of success and failure. You’d be surprised at how many different circumstances can lead to a participant doing or not doing something that is part of the expected task work flow. Know in advance which deviations are OK, which are artifacts, and which actually represent a true use error that needs to be analyzed for root cause and residual risk. A challenging proposition for device validation, this gets even trickier when testing perception and interpretation of screens or data in an app. Decide ahead of time what success needs to look like: Does each participant need to understand the concept behind the app inputs and outputs? Do they need to interpret trends? If so, then decide what needs to be interpreted and how, and know how the researcher will know if and when it has been interpreted correctly.
    3.  

     

       

    1. Engineer your data: When designing your test protocol, think about whether you will test with fake (pre-defined) data or if you will let participants use personal reference points when performing tasks with the app. This isn’t limited just to name, email address, and DOB. It could include other key assumptions about the users’ identity and training such as multipliers and dosing protocols as well as familiar volume increments and conversion methods. If you are building an app that calculates something a certain way, make sure you recruit participants who do it that way too, or at least establish important facts about the participants’ frame of reference in advance of administering tasks. If you are asking participants to draw meaning from trend data, make sure the trends displayed would make sense for a real person, and haven’t been randomly generated. In other words, think about the variability that could be introduced if you allow participants to use their own points of reference, but balance it against the test artifacts that could result if you don’t.
    2.  

     

    For more information, contact Kirsten Bruckbauer at kirsten.bruckbauer@gfk.com.

    • 07/24/15
    • Health
    • Retail
    • Consumer Goods
    • Global
    • English

    The UK cook: A changing breed

    Whether you produce or sell food and drink, make the tables consumers eat at, the kitchens they cook in or the appliances and utensils that help them, it’s vital that you know about trends in cooking. We are able to bring together a unique set of data sources to provide an insight into people’s attitudes, behavior and aspirations around eating at home. We draw on multiple sources including sales data, consumer trends and forward-focused research exploring homes of the future to highlight opportunities for innovation and growth across multiple food-connected categories.

    The Global Overview – Who Are The Experts?

    The UK is neither famous for its culinary skills nor deep interest in the subject. It’s therefore not surprising we fall behind many countries in key measures such as time spent cooking, level of behavior and aspirations around eating at home. We draw on multiple sources including sales data, consumer trends and forward-focused research exploring homes of the future to highlight opportunities for innovation and growth across multiple food-connected categories.knowledge and degree of passion for cookery. But behind that headline lies a matrix of change in our attitudes and behaviors in the kitchen.

    Time spent cooking We might reasonably consider the greatest time spent cooking to be during the family years with children at home. But our data confirms otherwise.

    This may be explained by the greater availability of time to spend in the kitchen for the over 60s, or a mistrust/dislike of ready meals and the desire to create meals from scratch. In contrast, a busy household with small children may rely more upon convenience food and quick cooking.

    The picture that emerges in the UK is that of a mix of creative cooks who use the latest gadgets, to time-pressed or unenthusiastic cooks who prefer the easiness of a ready meal. This presents an interesting proposition for manufacturers offering the range of culinary aids, devices and eating experiences and makes the need to identify your target market correctly a key challenge.

    Expanding our knowledge and interest Television brings us a huge 220+ hours of cookery programs each week. This attracts a total audience figure of around 30 million, nearly half the UK population. Sales of cookery books have also increased dramatically as our interest and desire for cooking expertise has grown.

    What does this mean…

    For food retailers? It is likely that two poles of behavior will continue. Ingredients necessary for cooking from scratch will still be in demand, but perhaps with a more variable focus as certain food types come in and out of fashion.

    For food producers? Ready meals are here to stay and time spent cooking is lower among the younger generation. For this age group, cooking for fun tends to be centred around particular items or occasions rather than everyday meals. However, the need to deliver healthy, fresh, balanced meals will continue to grow.

    For cooking utensil manufacturers? Interest in cooking is strong, but the opportunity appears to focus on the premium end of the market – utensils that speed up the cooking process, look good in the kitchen when entertaining at home and offer a healthy cooking method.

    For kitchen and dining furniture manufacturers and retailers? Kitchens clearly still need to be functional in design to enable time-efficient food preparation and cooking, but they also need to be inviting, enjoyable places to be when cooking for fun. The kitchen must also deliver a pleasant environment to eat, whether for family or for entertaining guests.

    For domestic appliance manufacturers? We’ve seen how the emergence of the smart home could revolutionize our interaction with our kitchens. The success of connected appliances depend on a few steps for manufacturers and retailers to consider:

    1. Convert the idea of the smart home from ‘nice to have’ to ‘essential to have’.

    2. Create real consumer need by offering appliances at affordable prices.

    3. Ensure appliances are easy to use and address privacy concerns.

    4. Raise awareness and drive demand by promotional activity and partnerships that sell appliances as packages.

    5. Train sales staff to understand and communicate the features and benefits of smart appliances.

    With these conditions addressed, smart appliances are a perfect way to drive consumer interest, demonstrating innovation and technological leadership.

    Despite the fact that the UK has lagged behind other countries in terms of interest in and passion for cooking, the trend for healthy eating and awareness of how technology can transform our experience of cooking, means that the market is in an interesting period of change. The fortunes of the ready meal market have altered over time, as have the occasions in which convenience foods are used compared to cooking from scratch. These shifts present opportunities for the manufacturers and retailers who are most aware of their consumers’ changing needs.

  • Delivering insights for optimal positioning of a new pharma brand
    • 07/24/15
    • Health
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Singapore
    • English

    Delivering insights for optimal positioning of a new pharma brand

    Our Predictive Benefit Framework considers key emotional factors that motivate treatment choice: security, wellbeing, gratification and freedom.

  • Delivering insights for optimal positioning of a new pharma brand
    • 07/24/15
    • Health
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • United Kingdom
    • English

    Delivering insights for optimal positioning of a new pharma brand

    Our Predictive Benefit Framework considers key emotional factors that motivate treatment choice: security, wellbeing, gratification and freedom.

    • 07/23/15
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Health
    • Australia
    • English

    GfK Study - Satisfaction with leisure time

    The busy pace of life is a popular complaint for many people. But findings released by GfK show that the majority of people internationally – 58 percent – say they are completely or fairly satisfied with the amount of leisure time that they have.

  • Map of the month: Purchasing power for health and hygiene products, Germany
    • 07/02/15
    • Health
    • Geomarketing
    • RegioGraph
    • Regional Market Data
    • Picture of the month
    • Global
    • English

    Map of the month: Purchasing power for health and hygiene products, Germany

    Our map of the month shows the regional purchasing power for drug store items at the level of Germany's districts (source: GfK Purchasing Power for Retail Product Lines 2014).

    • 06/10/15
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Health
    • Australia
    • English

    GfK Australia Study - Satisfaction with Looks

    Nearly half of adult Australians are satisfied with their looks, and they appear to be willing to work for them to some extent.

    • 06/09/15
    • Health
    • Brand and Customer Experience
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • United Kingdom
    • English

    Dissatisfaction in atopic dermatitis treatment; clear opportunities for new entrants

    A recent survey looking at moderate to severe adult patients treated with high potency topical steroids has revealed that over four out of 10 physicians and six out of 10 patients are not satisfied with the level of control achieved.

  • Dissatisfaction in atopic dermatitis treatment; clear opportunities for new entrants
    • 06/09/15
    • Health
    • Brand and Customer Experience
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Global
    • English

    Dissatisfaction in atopic dermatitis treatment; clear opportunities for new entrants

    A recent survey looking at moderate to severe adult patients treated with high potency topical steroids has revealed that over four out of 10 physicians and six out of 10 patients are not satisfied with the level of control achieved.

General