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    • 10/21/15
    • Health
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • United States
    • English

    Watch Out for Winter Blues: Canadians More Inclined to Experience Depression, Mental Health Issues – GfK Survey

    A survey by GfK revealed that one in four Canadians have experienced depression, anxiety or mental health issues in the past year.

    • 10/21/15
    • Health
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • United Kingdom
    • English

    Insomnia ranks 2nd after cold as most common health complaint internationally

    Top five most common conditions that people say they have experienced in the past 12 months are a cold, problems sleeping, muscle or joint pain due to injury or over exertion, weight problemsand migraines or severe headaches.

  • Insomnia ranks 2nd after cold as most common health complaint internationally
    • 10/21/15
    • Health
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global
    • English

    Insomnia ranks 2nd after cold as most common health complaint internationally

    Top five most common conditions that people say they have experienced in the past 12 months are a cold, problems sleeping, muscle or joint pain due to injury or over exertion, weight problems and migraines or severe headaches.

    • 10/18/15
    • Health
    • Global
    • English

    Pricing and reimbursement: The increasing role of multi-criteria decision analysis

    What is the justification for high drug prices for niche markets that include orphan drugs with annual price tags of more than €200,000 and the growing number of targeted therapies for well-defined, relatively small patient populations? No doubt, many of the recently launched products would not have achieved their high prices if their product features, such as efficacy and safety, were the sole criteria considered.

    Indication-specific factors, such as prevalence, number of competitors, characteristics of the target population, as well as the opinions and preferences of stakeholders – payer, physicians, patients and society – are playing an increasingly significant role for the pricing opportunity of new drugs.

    Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) has become a way to capture those different factors. And a growing number of health technology assessment (HTA) and payer organizations have started to implement MCDA in their decision-making process for coverage and/or pricing decisions.

    Multiple factors – different levels of importance

    Several studies have shown that, for example, prevalence (or rarity) of a disease is a strong price-driver, as well the severity (seriousness) of the disease, and the age (vulnerability) of the affected patient population. In other words, the smaller the patient population, the younger the patients and the more serious the disease, the higher is the payer’s (and society’s) willingness-to-pay. Conversely, a treatment for a mild form of a disease, which affects primarily elderly people and which is caused by smoking for instance, has less chance to be valued by society and is unlikely to achieve a commercially attractive price.

    So, how can the value of a product be determined, considering all the different factors which have varying importance for decision-making?

    One size does not fit all

    As the term implies, MCDA is a methodology which explicitly considers multiple criteria for decision-making. Thus, in the pharmaceutical world, MCDA means not only considering the therapeutic benefit of the new drug, but also elements, such as disease-related factors (burden of illness), innovation level, the evidence provided and the socio-economic impact of a new drug.

    A crucial first step in an MCDA is to identify the factors which are (at least potentially) relevant for the decision-making process. These factors can be collected by a literature search and ideally complemented by primary research with experts. The second and equally important step is the weighting of the factors, in terms of their relevance, for decision-making. Expert interviews can achieve this either by a simple point allocation exercise or more sophisticated methodologies, such as conjoint approaches or the hierarchical analytical process – all methodologies based on trade-off tasks to determine relative importance of criteria. In the third step, the product performance has to be assessed against the relevant factors to derive a (competitive) product performance score.

    A complicating factor in applying MCDA for HTA assessments is that the relevant decision criteria, as well as their weighting, can vary significantly by indication, which makes a standardized approach, and therefore a cross-indication comparison, very challenging. Another unsolved problem is a universal way to translate the derived MCDA value score(s) into a monetary value for pricing and reimbursement decisions.

    The increasing role of MCDA in pricing and reimbursement in decision-making

    Despite the challenges with MCDA, it is increasingly used by many HTA organizations and for pricing and reimbursement decision making. Although not many HTA and P&R bodies are currently using MCDA as a formal part in their decision-making, there is a clear trend suggesting that the importance of MCDA will increase over the coming years.

    For example Quebec’s HTA organization, the National Institute for Excellence in Health and Social Services (INESSS) has already adopted a multi-criteria approach as part of their appraisal process of new therapies.1 Similarly, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in the UK and Sweden’s Dental and Pharmaceutical Benefits Agency (TLV) have also adopted elements of the approach.

    The English National Health Service uses an MCDA process for deciding which oncology medicines will be funded by the national Cancer Drugs Fund 2 and the German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Healthcare ( IQWiG) has piloted two projects to validate the use of conjoint 3 and analytic hierarchical process to compose a multi-factor patient preference score4

    Another clear indicator of the increasing role of MCDA is the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) Vision 2020 Implementation Research Working Group, which identified “Good Practices for Using a Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis in Health Care Decisions” as one of the top priority methods for task force development.5

    For further information, contact Marco Rauland or Tim Fitzgerald.

    References

    [1] Aenishaenslin C, Hongoh V, Cissé HD, et al. Multi-criteria decision analysis as an innovative approach to managing zoonoses: results from a study on Lyme disease in Canada. BMC Public Health. 2013 Sep 30;13:897.

    [2] NHS England. Cancer Drug Fund decision summaries. Available at: www.england.nhs.uk/ourwork/pe/cdf/cdf-drug-sum. Accessed October 2015.

    [3] IQWiG. Choice-based Conjoint Analysis – pilot project to identify, weight, and prioritize multiple attributes in the indication “hepatitis C”. 23 July 2014.

    [4] IQWiG. Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) – Pilotprojekt zur Erhebung von Patientenpräferenzen in der Indikation Depression. Article in German. 8 May 2013.

    [5] ISPOR. Multi-criteria decision analysis in health care decision making emerging good practices task force. Available at: www.ispor.org/taskforces/multi-criteria-decision-analysis-bgr.asp. Accessed October 2015.

    • 10/14/15
    • Health
    • Digital Market Intelligence
    • Global
    • English

    How social media insights can help answer your health business questions

    There is no disputing the value of social media insights in health, though it is still generally not embedded and utilized in the daily business of most health companies. Primarily, companies stay away from the internet to avoid becoming aware of adverse events regarding their own products. And if they do listen to what is said on the internet, they have another challenge: getting the best out of the discussions and then turning those insights into actions. That is a missed opportunity, as online postings and discussions in the social media domain can be a great source of real-world data that is so valuable in the evolving health landscape.

    For instance, older consumers (50+), who are more vulnerable to diseases, are quickly adopting social media (e.g., 70% is already connected to Facebook).1 We also know that most adults trust medical information shared by peers in their social media networks. Blogs, forums and online platforms have evolved into trusted sources for sharing personal experiences related to medical conditions and diseases and for discussions on unmet needs, treatments and drug-related topics.

    The big advantage is that social media data add insights from unprompted discussions that are missed in traditional survey research. It is real-time and contextual. It is rather flexible, not having the constraints of sampling and study design. And it is ideal for discovering, isolating and tracking issues as they emerge. So, when interpreting and structuring the data, you might well be gaining valuable real world-evidence insights.

    However, most health companies are still struggling to harvest and activate the insights from social media. The issue is that while you might expect the yummy chocolate cookie in the form of a comprehensive perspective, often you will get just the crumbs and a fragmented picture. That is because social media is fraught with unstructured big data Insights. Although health issues are one of the most-discussed topics on the web, it is still like looking for the needle in the haystack. The importance of data relevance and accuracy is underestimated. Data and research integration are crucial to add value and industry-specific information is needed to put things in context.

    Let us outline three examples of integrated ways how we apply social media research and answer specific health-related business issues:

       

    1. Social network analysis for strategic segmentation and landscape mapping

    2.  

    Health companies need to understand the strategic landscape first, before starting operational planning. We use network analysis to follow the connections between people, brands and media.

    By mapping stakeholder groups and influencers, identifying and segmenting audience interests and affinities as well as tracking and evaluating health-related public debates, network analysis brings health companies strategic insights into the whole social ecosystem.

       

    1. Integrated analysis solutions for 360-degree brand equity tracking

    2.  

    Nowadays, digital media provides you with the ability to interact with and communicate about brands whenever you like. Brands are no longer created, managed and controlled solely by brand-directed activities, but they are also shaped through the communication between consumers, also patients and HCPs, in the digital world. Only by integrating social media information and tracking data do you get complete insights into managing your brand in an interactive world. A pre-condition for this exercise is an integrated research framework with harmonized KPIs to connect survey-based and unstructured social media data to finally make sense of both worlds.

       

    1. An early-warning mechanism on drug safety

      .

    2.  

    Monitoring social media to identify potential key safety issues enables health companies to act quickly and early on safety issues discussed on the internet. It is not only about getting access to this real-world data on drug performance, but also having a structured and referenced approach for coding, interpretation and classification in order to get the full picture.

    It’s important for healthcare companies not to relinquish the value of social media in the process of avoiding the potential risks of discovering adverse events regarding their brands. If you find yourself in such a social media dilemma, you don’t have to make the choice. Actively monitoring social media, including early signaling of any potential safe issues, can help you to securely embrace real-world discussions in social media forums that can help strengthen your brand.

    1 Roper Reports US – Fall Core 2014 Study; Interview Dates: September 23 – October 27, 2014

    This article was co-authored by Christian Waldheim of Social Media Intelligence.

    For further information, contact Jan Guse.

     

    • 10/11/15
    • Health
    • Global
    • English

    Five ways health companies can succeed in meeting today’s digital challenges

    Digital is today’s reality. Now, more than ever, this is true even in health-related businesses. New technologies are being introduced, and the speed of innovation is accelerating. With the rise in digital communications, the behavior of both patients and healthcare professionals (HCPs) is constantly evolving. And this phenomenon is not expected to slow down, but rather to intensify further. Think about the increasing connectivity of elderly people. It becomes significant as health-related sensor technology solutions become more and more available, leveraging digital cloud solutions in which patients will both passively and actively upload their medical and activity data.

    Against this landscape, today’s health companies face significant challenges and opportunities. But as we find with even our most digitally-advanced clients, there is a hesitation in accepting the challenge. Are they really ready to understand the opportunities available to them and put themselves in a position where they can bring them to life and to fruition?

    Here are five easy steps that might help you to meet your digital challenges in health:

       

    1. Think beyond silos.

    2.  

    Make sure your digital strategy is not isolated. Whether in your KPIs, target audience or strategic platform, digital needs to be linked to your overall strategy and your KPIs.

       

    1. Make your digital strategy part of your multi-channel approach.

    2.  

    Whether it is social media, an online information delivery platform or paid-for advertising, be clear about the role digital plays in your marketing strategy. Digital channels exist next to non-digital ones; touchpoint optimization research might help you to find an optimal mix of channel activity that will reinforce both impact and quality.

       

    1. Be specific when referring to “digital”.

    2.  

    Are you talking about digital products, platforms, marketing, research or all of them? Make sure everyone is aligned on this definition.

       

    1. Focus on the business issues you want to address or objectives you expect to meet.

    2.  

    This sounds like a no-brainer, but still many health companies have “digital” objectives that are not always clearly linked to the more holistic business goal.

       

    1. With regard to your target groups, think about a segmented approach with regard to digital.

    2.  

    If you are trying to reach patients or HCPs, they might be a heterogeneous group with varying levels of digital savvy. Reaching younger people requires more varied channels and tools (e.g., social platforms) beyond non-digital approaches. So think of digital differentiation when it comes to age, disease, location and so forth.

    These five steps may appear elementary; however, they definitely capture the foundation for a successful digital strategy. And they apply extremely well to the current digital situation in the health industry.

    Underpinning all of this is digital data – whether it is generated as digital performance analytics, social media insights, passive measurement, survey data or any other source. As new opportunities emerge, so digital data should play a key role in better understanding your market and its stakeholders, helping to provide answers to your business questions.

    Some examples include: How do patients and HCPs look for information and how do they connect with your brand (whether that is a treatment, service or program)? What are the most effective touchpoints and the optimal mix for your health marketing activities that have the greatest impact on performance? How do you efficiently prioritize your investments in all digital assets?

    Now we all know health products and communication need to be trusted, efficient and effective for all target groups. As a result, besides digital channels and new digital opportunities, non-digital channels will continue to be relevant. That means your digital strategy cannot exist on its own; it must be embedded in your corporate, sales and marketing plans and strategy. Your digital team needs to be closely linked to corporate affairs, your brand teams, the medical and pharmacovigilance teams and your business intelligence colleagues. It’s all about connecting the dots.

    When it comes to digital data, you’ll get more out of your intelligence activities the moment you combine data with other sources. The value of digital lies in its integration with other data sources to gain a more holistic and rich picture. In this respect we think health companies can still make a difference in both thinking and organizational structure. In the health industry, where the main sales model is continues to be based on sales representatives visits, ”digital” is still perceived as something new that needs special attention and objectives.

    But it is not in its infancy anymore and doesn’t need to be in a siloed structure. Rather it should be integrated into your existing marketing strategy. Only by connecting the dots will you have the full force of an uncompromising go-to-market strategy behind your brand.

    This article was co-authored by Arno Hummerston of Digital Marketing Intelligence.

    For further information, contact Jan Guse.

    • 09/29/15
    • Health
    • Global
    • English

    Faith-based organizations: a route reaching african american diabetes patients

    Diabetes disproportionately impacts African Americans. As compared to the non-Hispanic White population, African Americans are 2.2 times more likely to die from diabetes. Additionally, African Americans are at greater risk for diabetes-related complications such as visual impairment, end-stage renal disease, uncontrollable high blood pressure, and lower-extremity amputations.1

    Diabetes is arguably one of the most important health issues the African American community faces. As with all diabetes patients, African Americans are confronted with a host of barriers to optimal diabetes management. Such barriers include difficulty in managing treatment regimens (for diabetes plus an additional six comorbidities, on average), cost burdens, health literacy, and limited time with their healthcare professionals. Lack of cultural adaptation in diabetes self-management education (DSME) programs is an additional barrier to proper care affecting African American and other minority patients.

    DSME programs educate patients on effective decision-making and problem-solving in managing diabetes, and also promote self-care behaviors (proper eating habits, adherence to treatment regimens, etc.). The knowledge gained in DSME programs arms patients with the tools needed to contend with the complexity of managing diabetes. Studies have shown that the absence of cultural and social adaptation in DSME programs inhibits their effectiveness in minority populations.1 Additionally, evidence suggests that there is a need to increase utilization of non-traditional avenues in delivering DSME programs. Namely, faith-based organizations are highly effective in garnering participation in DSME programs among African Americans, yet are underutilized in reaching African Americans with diabetes.1,2

    There are several reasons delivering DSME programs to African Americans through faith-based organizations is advantageous:1,2

       

    • Often, the membership of a faith-based organization is united by common points of interest, cultural, and/or social backgrounds. This presents an opportunity for DSME programs to be tailored to the specific group they seek to reach.
    • 53% of African American adults attend worship services at least once per week (compared to 39% of the total US population).3 Studies have demonstrated higher completion rates when hosting DSME programs in and around regularly scheduled worship services.
    • Support of the organization’s leadership helps encourage participation and compliance in DSME programs.
    • Hosting DSME programs in faith-based organizations offers opportunities to reinforce key messages (for example, in sermons, or through modification of organizational food policies).
    •  

     

    With the prevalence of diabetes continuing in its upward trend, it is important to utilize all effective modes of promoting better patient care and outcomes. Faith-based organizations are a promising avenue by which to equip African American patients with the tools they need to manage this complex condition.

    For more information on the African American diabetes population, please contact Tasha Love at tasha.love@gfk.com.

    1 Peña-Purcell, N. et al. (2015). “Translating an evidence-based diabetes education approach into rural African-American communities: The ‘Wisdom, Power, Control’ Program”. Diabetes Spectrum, Vol. 28(2).

    2 Guiterrez, J. et al. (2014). “Health, community, and spirituality: Evaluation of a multicultural faith-based diabetes prevention program”. The Diabetes Educator, Vol. 40(2).

    3 PEW Research Center, www.pewforum.org

    • 09/24/15
    • Financial Services
    • Health
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Automotive
    • Consumer Goods
    • Brand and Customer Experience
    • Consumer Panels
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Shopper
    • User Experience (UX)
    • United States
    • English

    GfK Announces Management Board Changes

    GfK SE announced that Debbie Pruent will retire and be replaced by David Krajicek as Chief Commercial Officer for the Consumer Experiences Sector.

  • Gaining foresight into the needs of diabetes patients
    • 09/23/15
    • Health
    • Brand and Customer Experience
    • Global
    • English

    Gaining foresight into the needs of diabetes patients

    Combining digital observation with traditional surveys, we reveal the purchase journey for people with this common medical condition.

  • Gaining foresight into the needs of diabetes patients
    • 09/23/15
    • Health
    • Brand and Customer Experience
    • United Kingdom
    • English

    Gaining foresight into the needs of diabetes patients

    Our diabetes market experience research blended digital observation with traditional surveys to better understand diabetes patients’ buying, navigation and search behavior.

  • Gaining foresight into the needs of diabetes patients
    • 09/23/15
    • Health
    • Brand and Customer Experience
    • Belgium
    • English

    Gaining foresight into the needs of diabetes patients

    Our diabetes market experience research blended digital observation with traditional surveys to better understand diabetes patients’ buying, navigation and search behavior.

  • Gaining foresight into the needs of diabetes patients
    • 09/23/15
    • Health
    • Brand and Customer Experience
    • Singapore
    • English

    Gaining foresight into the needs of diabetes patients

    Our diabetes market experience research blended digital observation with traditional surveys to better understand diabetes patients’ buying, navigation and search behavior.

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