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    • 05/18/16
    • Financial Services
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Consumer Goods
    • Denmark
    • English

    The future of retail and what it means for the industry

    “Build it and they will come” has long been the modus operandi for the retail sector. But two decades of unprecedented change both in terms of technology and the economic environment has shaken the retail sector. This is the age of the Connected Consumer who expects retailers to fulfill their needs before they even ask. Omni-channel is the word that now defines retail as we have moved to a model where retailers need to be constantly present, ready to engage with shoppers in the moment and on the move – as well as on the high street. This is what retailers must do to survive in the Future of Retail.

    Four key battlegrounds: Choice, price, convenience and experience

    The retail environment may have changed dramatically but the four key battlegrounds – choice, price, convenience and experience – are every bit in evidence. On each front, retailers must work harder to survive, let alone win. This is a world where prices are standardized, consumers are dazzled and confused by endless choice, and shoppers judge stores by the way they make them feel not just the goods they sell.

    All retailers, from pure play online stores to the stalwarts of our high streets and malls and everything in between, now face a myriad of challenges. At its heart is the shopper of the future – today’s constantly Connected Consumers who want it all and expect retailers to come up with the goods.

     

     

    The shopper of the future expects retailers to keep up with them

    Understanding what makes these shoppers tick is more than half the challenge. Price savvy, technologically forward and with a mission to fulfill, the shopper of the future expects retailers to keep up with them, not the other way around. The challenge for retailers is to stay one step ahead of consumers’ demands. That means delivering on all fronts, be it product choice, service, customer experience or price.

    The retailers that dominate and define this new age of retail will be the ones for whom change and uncertainty represents a fresh opportunity to thrive. Understanding the constantly changing consumer and market landscapes will be key, as will be a willingness to embrace innovations and invest to benefit retailers and customers now and in the years to come. That future of retail is here and now.

    Are you ready for the Future of Retail? Find out more about how to navigate the Future of Retail in our report.

    Please share your thoughts in the comments below or email me at James.Llewellyn@gfk.com.

    • 05/18/16
    • Financial Services
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Consumer Goods
    • Norway
    • English

    The future of retail and what it means for the industry

    “Build it and they will come” has long been the modus operandi for the retail sector. But two decades of unprecedented change both in terms of technology and the economic environment has shaken the retail sector. This is the age of the Connected Consumer who expects retailers to fulfill their needs before they even ask. Omni-channel is the word that now defines retail as we have moved to a model where retailers need to be constantly present, ready to engage with shoppers in the moment and on the move – as well as on the high street. This is what retailers must do to survive in the Future of Retail.

    Four key battlegrounds: Choice, price, convenience and experience

    The retail environment may have changed dramatically but the four key battlegrounds – choice, price, convenience and experience – are every bit in evidence. On each front, retailers must work harder to survive, let alone win. This is a world where prices are standardized, consumers are dazzled and confused by endless choice, and shoppers judge stores by the way they make them feel not just the goods they sell.

    All retailers, from pure play online stores to the stalwarts of our high streets and malls and everything in between, now face a myriad of challenges. At its heart is the shopper of the future – today’s constantly Connected Consumers who want it all and expect retailers to come up with the goods.

     

     

    The shopper of the future expects retailers to keep up with them

    Understanding what makes these shoppers tick is more than half the challenge. Price savvy, technologically forward and with a mission to fulfill, the shopper of the future expects retailers to keep up with them, not the other way around. The challenge for retailers is to stay one step ahead of consumers’ demands. That means delivering on all fronts, be it product choice, service, customer experience or price.

    The retailers that dominate and define this new age of retail will be the ones for whom change and uncertainty represents a fresh opportunity to thrive. Understanding the constantly changing consumer and market landscapes will be key, as will be a willingness to embrace innovations and invest to benefit retailers and customers now and in the years to come. That future of retail is here and now.

    Are you ready for the Future of Retail? Find out more about how to navigate the Future of Retail in our report.

    Please share your thoughts in the comments below or email me at James.Llewellyn@gfk.com.

    • 05/18/16
    • Financial Services
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Consumer Goods
    • Sweden
    • English

    The future of retail and what it means for the industry

    “Build it and they will come” has long been the modus operandi for the retail sector. But two decades of unprecedented change both in terms of technology and the economic environment has shaken the retail sector. This is the age of the Connected Consumer who expects retailers to fulfill their needs before they even ask. Omni-channel is the word that now defines retail as we have moved to a model where retailers need to be constantly present, ready to engage with shoppers in the moment and on the move – as well as on the high street. This is what retailers must do to survive in the Future of Retail.

    Four key battlegrounds: Choice, price, convenience and experience

    The retail environment may have changed dramatically but the four key battlegrounds – choice, price, convenience and experience – are every bit in evidence. On each front, retailers must work harder to survive, let alone win. This is a world where prices are standardized, consumers are dazzled and confused by endless choice, and shoppers judge stores by the way they make them feel not just the goods they sell.

    All retailers, from pure play online stores to the stalwarts of our high streets and malls and everything in between, now face a myriad of challenges. At its heart is the shopper of the future – today’s constantly Connected Consumers who want it all and expect retailers to come up with the goods.

     

     

    The shopper of the future expects retailers to keep up with them

    Understanding what makes these shoppers tick is more than half the challenge. Price savvy, technologically forward and with a mission to fulfill, the shopper of the future expects retailers to keep up with them, not the other way around. The challenge for retailers is to stay one step ahead of consumers’ demands. That means delivering on all fronts, be it product choice, service, customer experience or price.

    The retailers that dominate and define this new age of retail will be the ones for whom change and uncertainty represents a fresh opportunity to thrive. Understanding the constantly changing consumer and market landscapes will be key, as will be a willingness to embrace innovations and invest to benefit retailers and customers now and in the years to come. That future of retail is here and now.

    Are you ready for the Future of Retail? Find out more about how to navigate the Future of Retail in our report.

    Please share your thoughts in the comments below or email me at James.Llewellyn@gfk.com.

    • 05/18/16
    • Financial Services
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Consumer Goods
    • United Kingdom
    • English

    The future of retail and what it means for the industry

    “Build it and they will come” has long been the modus operandi for the retail sector. But two decades of unprecedented change both in terms of technology and the economic environment has shaken the retail sector. This is the age of the Connected Consumer who expects retailers to fulfill their needs before they even ask. Omni-channel is the word that now defines retail as we have moved to a model where retailers need to be constantly present, ready to engage with shoppers in the moment and on the move – as well as on the high street. This is what retailers must do to survive in the Future of Retail.

    Four key battlegrounds: Choice, price, convenience and experience

    The retail environment may have changed dramatically but the four key battlegrounds – choice, price, convenience and experience – are every bit in evidence. On each front, retailers must work harder to survive, let alone win. This is a world where prices are standardized, consumers are dazzled and confused by endless choice, and shoppers judge stores by the way they make them feel not just the goods they sell.

    All retailers, from pure play online stores to the stalwarts of our high streets and malls and everything in between, now face a myriad of challenges. At its heart is the shopper of the future – today’s constantly Connected Consumers who want it all and expect retailers to come up with the goods.

     

     

    The shopper of the future expects retailers to keep up with them

    Understanding what makes these shoppers tick is more than half the challenge. Price savvy, technologically forward and with a mission to fulfill, the shopper of the future expects retailers to keep up with them, not the other way around. The challenge for retailers is to stay one step ahead of consumers’ demands. That means delivering on all fronts, be it product choice, service, customer experience or price.

    The retailers that dominate and define this new age of retail will be the ones for whom change and uncertainty represents a fresh opportunity to thrive. Understanding the constantly changing consumer and market landscapes will be key, as will be a willingness to embrace innovations and invest to benefit retailers and customers now and in the years to come. That future of retail is here and now.

    Are you ready for the Future of Retail? Find out more about how to navigate the Future of Retail in our report.

    Please share your thoughts in the comments below or email me at James.Llewellyn@gfk.com.

    • 05/06/16
    • Financial Services
    • Global
    • English

    5 findings on people’s financial mindsets

    Internationally, people with a ‘save now’ mindset just outnumber people with a ‘have fun now’ mindset – but the numbers are very close.

    We asked over 27,000 people across 22 countries to indicate how strongly they agree or disagree with the statement “I want to enjoy life today and will worry about savings and investments later”.

    By analyzing the results at different levels (international, by country, by gender, by age group), we can share a snap-shot of the financial mindsets prevailing in different countries and demographics. For example – does a specific country have a population that favors living for today – and therefore are likely to respond to offers of instant-access accounts or cash-back incentives? Or does the population favour thinking about savings and investments today – and therefore be more interested in long-term fixed interest accounts and pension products etc.   And what is the breakdown across age groups and genders?

     

    Five findings on nations’ financial mindsets

    1. 16 of the 22 countries are fairly evenly divided between fun-lovers and savers

    Only eight of the 22 countries in the survey showed a big gap (ten percentage points difference or more) between those who agree with putting off worrying about savings, and those who favor thinking about savings and investments today. And, in all of these, the larger group is on the side of favoring saving today.

    Of those eight countries, six fall between a 10-13 percentage point difference and only two stand out as having a really major skew. The Czech Republic shows a 32 percentage point difference on the side of saving today and Hong Kong shows 28 percentage point difference the same way.

    2. Only four countries have more fun-lovers than savers

    Of the 22 countries studied, only China, the Netherlands, Sweden and Turkey have greater numbers of their online population who agree with enjoying life today and worrying about savings and investments later, compared to the number disagreeing.

    3. Hong Kong is only country where over half of the population favor saving today

    Hong Kong stands out as the only country where more than half of the online population show a ‘save now’ mindset. In this country, 54 percent disagree with the idea of enjoying life today and worrying about savings and investments later. The Czech Republic runs second with 49 percent disagreeing, followed by Brazil with 45 percent.

    4. Women more inclined to be savings-minded; men are evenly divided

    Although a third (33 percent) of women internationally agree with enjoying life now and worrying about financial security later, a greater number (40 percent) disagree. Men, however, are more evenly divided with 36 percent agreeing and 35 percent disagreeing.

    5. Twenty-somethings beat teenagers on percentage of fun-lovers

    Online consumers aged 20-29 years old have the highest percentage of fun-lovers of any age group, with 41 percent agreeing with having fun now and worrying about saving later. Teenagers (15-19 years old) and those aged 30-39 years old come next – standing almost equal at 37 percent and 36 percent respectively. And a quarter (26 percent) of people aged 50-59 years old and 60+ years old also agree with living for today.

    On the other end of the scale, the numbers showing a more ‘save now’ mindset increases fairly steadily with each age group. This starts at a third (34 percent) of both teenagers and 20-29 year olds and peaks at 43 percent of 50-59 year olds and 42 percent of those aged 60 and over.

    Download the complete findings for each of the 22 countries, with breakdown by gender and age group.

    Please share your thoughts in the comments below or contact me at amanda.martin@gfk.com.


    About the study

    GfK conducted an online survey with over 27,000 consumers aged 15 or older in 22 countries. Fieldwork was completed in June 2015 and data are weighted to reflect the demographic composition of the online population age 15+ in each market. The countries included are Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Netherlands, Poland, Russia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Turkey, U.K and U.S.

     

     

  • Connected Consumer Index
    • 05/06/16
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Home Appliances
    • Financial Services
    • Health
    • Health Technology
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Travel and Hospitality
    • Automotive
    • Consumer Goods
    • Home and Living
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • United Kingdom
    • English

    Connected Consumer Index

    GfK’s Connected Consumer Index provides a single measure covering how much, and on what devices, consumers in each of 78 countries and 8 world regions digitally connect with each other and with digital content. 

  • Economic uncertainty clouds consumer confidence
    • 04/29/16
    • Financial Services
    • Consumer Goods
    • Consumer Panels
    • United Kingdom
    • English

    Economic uncertainty clouds consumer confidence

    Index tumbles into negative territory for the first time in 15 months. 

    GfK’s long-running Consumer Confidence Index dropped three points in April to -3. 

  • Economic uncertainty clouds consumer confidence
    • 04/29/16
    • Financial Services
    • Consumer Goods
    • Consumer Panels
    • Global
    • English

    Economic uncertainty clouds consumer confidence

    Index tumbles into negative territory for the first time in 15 months. 

    GfK’s long-running Consumer Confidence Index dropped three points in April to -3. 

  • Savers just outnumber fun-lovers internationally
    • 04/28/16
    • Press
    • Financial Services
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global
    • English

    Savers just outnumber fun-lovers internationally

    Internationally, people with a ‘save now’ mindset just outnumber people with a ‘have fun now’ mindset – but the numbers are very close.

  • Savers just outnumber fun-lovers internationally
    • 04/28/16
    • Financial Services
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Australia
    • English

    Savers just outnumber fun-lovers internationally

    Internationally, people with a ‘save now’ mindset just outnumber people with a ‘have fun now’ mindset – but the numbers are very close.

  • Savers just outnumber fun-lovers internationally
    • 04/28/16
    • Financial Services
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • United Kingdom
    • English

    Savers just outnumber fun-lovers internationally

    Internationally, people with a ‘save now’ mindset just outnumber people with a ‘have fun now’ mindset – but the numbers are very close.

  • To keep millennial shoppers in store, embrace the frictionless payment future today
    • 04/27/16
    • Financial Services
    • United States
    • English

    To keep millennial shoppers in store, embrace the frictionless payment future today

    Providing consumers with shopping and purchase experiences that will keep them coming back for more is one of the highest priorities for retailers. In-store shopping needs to intertwine seamlessly with the growing online and mobile aspects of purchasing. Ideally, a retail brand will look, feel, engage and deliver to customers at every touchpoint, with every interaction.

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