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  • The Future Consumer Summit 2015
    • 10/08/15
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Home Appliances
    • Financial Services
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Travel and Hospitality
    • Consumer Goods
    • FMCG
    • Media Measurement
    • Brand and Customer Experience
    • Digital Market Intelligence
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Point of Sales Tracking
    • Shopper
    • User Experience (UX)
    • United Kingdom
    • English

    10/08/15
    The Future Consumer Summit 2015

    Thank you to all who attended our 2015 Future Consumer Summit on 8th October at East Wintergarden, Canary Wharf. I hope you agree the event was a fantastic opportunity to hear our experts alongside future thinkers from leading brands deliver their vision and evidence based predictions of future consumer behaviour. We know technology will continue to have a massive impact on consumer behaviour. Understanding how this will look in the future is critical to the success of your business and we really want to support you on that journey.

    • 10/05/15
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • United States
    • English

    Social Media Buzz about Caitlyn Jenner Drove Readers to Vanity Fair Print Edition

    In a clear demonstration of the connections between digital and “traditional” platforms, social media chatter played a key role in generating awareness and readership of Vanity Fair’s recent print issue with Caitlyn Jenner on the cover.

  • GfK has started delivery of TV audience measurement data to clients in Brazil
    • 10/02/15
    • Investors
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    GfK has started delivery of TV audience measurement data to clients in Brazil

    GfK has launched its TV household audience measurement panel in Brazil.

    • 10/01/15
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • GfK-MRI
    • United States
    • English

    Millennials Account for 70% of Instagram Users, 61% on Twitter -– GfK MRI Data

    The latest research from GfK MRI shows that Millennials play a dominant role on many of the top social media sites.

  • USA: Video Callers Skew Female, Millennial, Well Educated and Affluent – GfK MRI
    • 09/28/15
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    USA: Video Callers Skew Female, Millennial, Well Educated and Affluent – GfK MRI

    Nearly one quarter (23%) of all US adults who own a mobile phone, e-reader, or tablet took part in a video call on one of those mobile devices in the last 30 days.

    • 09/28/15
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • United States
    • English

    Video Callers Skew Female, Millennial, Well Educated and Affluent – GfK MRI

    Nearly one quarter (23%) of all US adults who own a mobile phone, e-reader, or tablet took part in a video call on one of those mobile devices in the last 30 days.

  • Big questions, big answers.
    • 09/21/15
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    Big questions, big answers.

    Will harnessing smart data for audience analytics save the broadcast industry?

    • 09/14/15
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    The currency exchange market for audience measurement

    As PAMCo, the Publishers Audience Measurement Company, announces its replacement for the National Readership Survey, it is worth pausing to reflect on the key issues that all media audience measurement currencies have in maintaining their evolution to meet the increasingly intense commercial demands of its industry stakeholders.

    Changing a currency is not easy. Countries will testify to this. You only need to consider the challenge of changing to decimal currency in the UK in 1971, or the more recent difficulties experienced by the Eurozone countries that adopted a single currency. Part of the problem is that a currency has political significance and so changing it can prove painful. It also takes time, and by time I mean possibly years, to make any adjustment.

    PAMCo is just embarking on that change journey and is looking to publish its first set of results in 2017. BARB is looking towards a total video currency and RAJAR is keen, but understandably cautious, to integrate passive electronic measurement.

    Below I list three major challenges facing all media as they strive to maintain relevance and credibility with their audience measurement currencies.

       

    • More haste, less speed

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    A woodsman was once asked, “What would you do if you had just five minutes to chop down a tree?” He answered, “I would spend the first two and a half minutes sharpening my axe.”

    Some Commercial Directors in media owner companies are losing patience with industry research. Profits are falling and the lack of real-time, cross-platform audience data leads to cries about the research being slow and useless, particularly in the battle against digital-only properties. Messengers are often shot or at least mauled.

    The counter argument presented by researchers and technical consultants is that, given a clear brief, a solution can be designed to meet any set of commercial requirements – albeit at a price. But it is a solution that needs to be carefully tested and validated given the size of the advertising pot relying on the quality of the numbers. Would you put your family in a car that had not gone through any Euro NCAP safety tests? Questions still exist over the quality of a lot of online metrics despite the best endeavors of UK organisations such as ABC, UKOM, IAB, and, in the US, The Media Ratings Council.

    It pays to have a clear and industry-agreed vision of what the metric should deliver to ensure it meets the market’s demands now and the future, and that there exists a realistic roadmap before any work commences. It also pays to have a simple definition of the reader, viewer and listener. With a blunt axe, it will take much longer than five minutes to chop down a tree.

       

    • Deliver both innovation and stability

    •  

    The cri de coeur of media owners and agencies is to improve the measurement systems, but not to change the existing data. This is a not an unreasonable request given the money at risk. But I would argue that incremental change is every bit as important as innovation. If you lift the lid on all the UK media measurement contracts today, the engines look very different from those you would have found ten years ago, or even five years ago in some cases. For example, RAJAR is still administered using diaries, but by looking to offer participants a choice of paper, PC, smartphone and tablet, it promotes better response rates, participant engagement and data quality. In Australia, GfK successfully introduced a new radio currency without disrupting previous audience trends and enhanced it with an extra layer of radio listener insights through GfK Radio Insights.

    It remains to be seen what happens to the UK readership data. It certainly appears that the measures put in place so far appear to strive for the optimum balance between innovation and stability.

       

    • Demand better, faster and cheaper

    •  

    Read any industry contract tender specification and at the heart will be a requirement to deliver better, faster and cheaper data. It is the age-old trade-off and one that more often than not ends in compromise. As Rodney Harris, a UK media agency director in the 1980s, once said, “Media research is not designed to find out the truth; it is a treaty between interested parties.” There is a fear that “better” is being sacrificed for “faster” and “cheaper”. Either way, it needs to be the best that the money available can buy. The worst case scenario is that trying to deliver on all three leads to inertia and nobody spots the frog boiling in the bucket.

    Whether currency change is forced through economic conditions or something else, the ultimate measure of success is acceptance and credibility across all parties. Collaboration is king. It is a matter of uniting competing stakeholders, bringing together different data suppliers or combining survey and server data, each with their own strengths, so that the whole is greater than the sum of the parts. That is where the success and credibility of audience measurement lies.

    John Carroll is Head of Audience Measurement for UK, Nordics & Baltics at GfK. He can be reached at john.carroll@gfk.com or followed on Twitter @MediaCarroll

    • 08/20/15
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    Tech forward with teens: Stepping outside the new media bubble

    Sitting at a recent media conference, I once again heard someone tell how their family – and especially their teen – is the example of how the media market is being disrupted, or even dying. These “my family” anecdotes are so prevalent at media conferences that, for the last couple of years, I’ve kept a running total of them, just for amusement.

    But these anecdotes confound me, as they tend to reflect the “bubble” that many media people live in – a state of being unlikely to be to found west of the Delaware River or east of Interstate 5 (on the West Coast). And this presence in the bubble may distort their perception of the overall marketplace.

    This year, I decided to put some real data on my intuition. As my source, I used our recently released 2015 Ownership and Trend Report[1], which not only provides subscribers with long-term trends, but also allows users to parse the data to address many business issues. With our fully representative and projectable sample, we can supply highly reliable media profiles of American households.

    I looked at “Tech Forward” regions well colonized by the media industry – around New York City, Boston, Austin, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Seattle – and compared them with the rest of the USA for a short, but useful, list of media devices/services. What we found is that Tech Forward regions are indeed significantly more likely than the rest of the USA to view OTT content on TV sets; to own a tablet; and to have broadband connection to their home.

    Counter-intuitively, if you have listened to the anecdotes, we also see that Tech Forward regions are significantly less likely to have cut the cord, and are more likely to have pay TV, than the rest of the country. Even though they own more devices for alternative viewing, Tech Forward regions are still devotees of pay TV.

    Slicing the data further to compare Tech Forward region homes that have teenagers widens the gap even more. These “Tech Forward Teen” homes are significantly even more likely than non-Tech Forward homes to view OTT content on TV sets; to subscribe to an SVOD service; to own a tablet; and to have broadband connection.

     

    This harkens back to the concept of “regional differences” – the idea that media usage, habits of consumption, and even receptivity to advertising – can vary notably by geographic area. Savvy researchers leverage this concept for their businesses to make sure tactics, strategies, or messaging is tweaked for maximum impact in different areas of the country.

    But if you add a teenager to the already lopsided tech profile of households in these tech forward/media regions, the opportunities for misunderstanding become acute. It is easy when one lives in L.A. or New York to forget that “normal behavior” may be very different just a state or two away. Such a bubble can burst business strategies, if they were based on a distorted perception of the total marketplace – and especially if your market target has the teen wildcard in play.

    For more information, please contact David Tice at david.tice@gfk.com.

    [1] 2015 Ownership and Trend Report, published June 2015 as part of GfK’s The Home Technology Monitor™ service. The study used a sample of 3,100 US households, including representative levels of off-line, cell-phone-only, and Spanish-speaking homes.

  • Are you really reaching the intended audience?
    • 08/12/15
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    Are you really reaching the intended audience?

    In a world of communication overload and fragmented audiences, every message counts. Make sure you reach the right audience… with GfK.

    • 08/05/15
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    It’s research science, not rocket science

    I came across a job advert the other day from an advertising agency for a ‘Research Scientist’. Just to be clear, I was not looking for a new job having just acquired one! But it was the job title that caught my eye. They were looking for a data scientist who understood market research. Equally, they were looking for a market researcher who understood data science. Or something like that.

    Maybe advertising for a market researcher on its own does not have any allure; or that everyone is calling themselves data scientists these days, and Harvard Business Review called it the sexiest job of the 21st Century? Or maybe it is an acknowledgement that just being one or the other is no longer sufficient in our fast-moving, mobile-first, media world? Or maybe they are one and the same nowadays anyway? Whatever it is, one does wonder though where these people are going to come from. Given the relatively recent hype around big data, it would need some fast-tracked Darwinian intervention to provide a ready-made talent pool of ‘research scientists’.

    In my experience, a dedicated data science team sitting alongside, or interspersed with, researchers, as can often be found in market research companies today, can yield fantastic benefits – whether it is broadening the skill sets and experience of both sets of individuals, or delivering the optimum project team to clients. Collaboration really is king.

    A fine example of this is with MMS in Sweden, the body that oversees the television audience measurement. There are a number of data streams from different sources and different companies providing the audience data. GfK will integrate these datasets into a single Total Video Currency through methodological consultancy and data science expertise. That really is research science in action.

    Whilst data fusion is not a new concept in media research (the German industry research body, AG.MA, started developing applications in the 1970s), it demonstrates that integrated analytics of data are now laying the foundation stones for today’s audience measurement across all media. This is important because both cost and participant burden preclude designing a vast single-source study from scratch. In simple terms: optimise the component parts and weld them all together. It’s not rocket science.

    John Carroll is Head of Audience Measurement for UK, Nordics & Baltics at GfK. He can be reached at john.carroll@gfk.com or followed on Twitter @MediaCarroll

    • 08/04/15
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • United States
    • English

    GfK MRI Expands Digital, TV Focus with Strategic Hires, New Product Lines

    Kevin King (SVP, Mobile Measurement and Trends) and Karen Ramspacher (SVP, Consumer Insights) have joined a growing GfK MRI Product Innovation team.

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