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  • Radio Audience Measurement - Resources
    • 12/16/15
    • Media Measurement
    • RAM-Resources
    • New Zealand
    • English

    Radio Audience Measurement - Resources

    Training and Survey Schedules

    Prize Draw Information

    • 12/10/15
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Technology
    • Media Measurement
    • GfK-MRI
    • United States
    • English

    GfK MRI’s Kahlert Named to SURVEY Magazine’s “20 Researchers You Need to Know”

    For its latest “20 Researchers You Need to Know” feature, SURVEY Magazine has cited Florian Kahlert (Managing Director, GfK MRI) as a Research Visionary, recognizing his path-breaking contributions to digital and traditional media research.

    • 12/09/15
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • United States
    • English

    Pay TV “Defectors” Outnumber Those Who Want More TV Service by 2 to 1

    Almost one-third of all US consumers – over 70 million people – are thinking of making changes to their paid TV service, with pay-TV “Defectors“ more than twice as common as “Desirers” of more TV service.

  • GfK MRI Wins Three PDRF Awards; Topics Include Programmatic Print Ad Buying, Magazine Audience Measurement
    • 11/04/15
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Technology
    • Media Measurement
    • GfK-MRI
    • United States
    • English

    GfK MRI Wins Three PDRF Awards; Topics Include Programmatic Print Ad Buying, Magazine Audience Measurement

    Researchers from GfK MRI have won three awards at this year’s Print and Digital Research Forum (PDRF) for their pioneering work in measuring magazine readership, connecting advertisers to print audiences via programmatic buying.

    • 10/28/15
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Digital Market Intelligence
    • United States
    • English

    Regular Users of Netflix in the US Watch 10 TV Shows Per Week via the Service; Level Has Doubled in Three Years

    Regular (monthly) Netflix users in the US say they watch 10 shows per week via the platform – as well as 4 movies during the same timeframe.

  • GfK MRI’s King to Take Part in Mobile Metrics Panels at MediaPost, MPA Conferences
    • 10/27/15
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Digital Market Intelligence
    • GfK-MRI
    • United States
    • English

    GfK MRI’s King to Take Part in Mobile Metrics Panels at MediaPost, MPA Conferences

    GfK MRI’s Kevin King is participating in two upcoming conference sessions aimed at clarifying the issues in mobile targeting and metrics.

    • 10/21/15
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    Putting the me in tomorrow’s media experience: the future of the BBC

    Some people have argued that the BBC’s role in the British Media has considerably diminished over the past few years, but as the organization still reaches 97% of the population every week, I believe it still has an important role to play. Furthermore, with competition from OTT services continually rising, old Auntie can’t afford to stand still and must ensure she retains her share of the market, especially among younger audiences.

    Some key changes in the market. As well as an erosion of the amount of time generations are spending with TV and Radio, audiences now also want to be ‘in control’ of their content. Thinking about TV viewing specifically, viewers want to decide when they watch something, how they watch it (all episodes of a series in one sitting) and how they are going to share it with friends and family.

    If we look at how Radio 1 was consumed 10 years ago, for example, the changes compared to today are remarkable. Where once shows were only listened to at specific times of the day, users can now choose to rewind bits of the show they missed, or just listen to it all again later; they can tune in to their favorite shows on the car radio, but they can also listen online through the app or the website (on a range of devices); podcasts are created on a daily basis and thousands of views are registered every day on the station’s YouTube channel.

    Moving away from radio, the BBC has been also experimenting (successfully) with Netflix-style TV launches, making a whole series of TV shows available to its users in one go. For example, the launch of Car Share was met with millions of iPlayer requests to stream/download each episode of the series, a much higher audience volume than would have been expected had the show been released offline.

    Many of the changes I’ve mentioned were incorporated by the BBC long before the majority of their competitors, so they have had time to refine their strategies, as well as providing the organization valuable learnings to take forward. But in my opinion, the most interesting move is how the BBC are using audience data to improve their services.

    Chart Beat is a tool the BBC currently employs to analyze traffic data across all of the BBC’s websites in real time. The News and Current Affairs team monitor which stories are performing well (or not so well) on BBC News website, and how they can instantly re-arrange the webpages to increase audience engagement. The second tool that was talked about was MyBBC. This new service, using data made available by users being signed in across the BBCs platforms, will eventually provide audiences with tailored content that helps them unlock even more value from the BBC which, in the long run, will increase overall satisfaction and loyalty to the organization.

    The BBC has previously anticipated industry changes and reacted by developing the necessary infrastructure to fully serve its audience. From what we have heard they are developing, and from seeing how they have adapted their delivery and content strategies in the past, I think we can be confident that the BBC will continue to evolve and find new ways to serve its existing audience, as well as finding new, innovative ways to serve the next generations of viewers, listeners, readers and browsers.

    Niko Waesche (Global Industry Lead of Media and Entertainment @ GfK) and Nick North (Director of Audiences @ BBC) shared the presenting duties in the penultimate keynote speech of the GfK Future Consumer Summit 2015, speaking about the changes happening to the media landscape and the challenges this presents media companies of today. In the first part of the presentation, Niko focused in on the issues surrounding the industry as a whole (see part 1), while in the second half, Nick North explained the steps the BBC has taken to keep up with the ever-evolving consumer trends, and what plans the organization has to cope with changes in the future.

    • 10/21/15
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • South Africa
    • English

    Putting the me in tomorrow’s media experience: the future of the BBC

    Some people have argued that the BBC’s role in the British Media has considerably diminished over the past few years, but as the organization still reaches 97% of the population every week, I believe it still has an important role to play. Furthermore, with competition from OTT services continually rising, old Auntie can’t afford to stand still and must ensure she retains her share of the market, especially among younger audiences.

    Some key changes in the market. As well as an erosion of the amount of time generations are spending with TV and Radio, audiences now also want to be ‘in control’ of their content. Thinking about TV viewing specifically, viewers want to decide when they watch something, how they watch it (all episodes of a series in one sitting) and how they are going to share it with friends and family.

    If we look at how Radio 1 was consumed 10 years ago, for example, the changes compared to today are remarkable. Where once shows were only listened to at specific times of the day, users can now choose to rewind bits of the show they missed, or just listen to it all again later; they can tune in to their favorite shows on the car radio, but they can also listen online through the app or the website (on a range of devices); podcasts are created on a daily basis and thousands of views are registered every day on the station’s YouTube channel.

    Moving away from radio, the BBC has been also experimenting (successfully) with Netflix-style TV launches, making a whole series of TV shows available to its users in one go. For example, the launch of Car Share was met with millions of iPlayer requests to stream/download each episode of the series, a much higher audience volume than would have been expected had the show been released offline.

    Many of the changes I’ve mentioned were incorporated by the BBC long before the majority of their competitors, so they have had time to refine their strategies, as well as providing the organization valuable learnings to take forward. But in my opinion, the most interesting move is how the BBC are using audience data to improve their services.

    Chart Beat is a tool the BBC currently employs to analyze traffic data across all of the BBC’s websites in real time. The News and Current Affairs team monitor which stories are performing well (or not so well) on BBC News website, and how they can instantly re-arrange the webpages to increase audience engagement. The second tool that was talked about was MyBBC. This new service, using data made available by users being signed in across the BBCs platforms, will eventually provide audiences with tailored content that helps them unlock even more value from the BBC which, in the long run, will increase overall satisfaction and loyalty to the organization.

    The BBC has previously anticipated industry changes and reacted by developing the necessary infrastructure to fully serve its audience. From what we have heard they are developing, and from seeing how they have adapted their delivery and content strategies in the past, I think we can be confident that the BBC will continue to evolve and find new ways to serve its existing audience, as well as finding new, innovative ways to serve the next generations of viewers, listeners, readers and browsers.

    Niko Waesche (Global Industry Lead of Media and Entertainment @ GfK) and Nick North (Director of Audiences @ BBC) shared the presenting duties in the penultimate keynote speech of the GfK Future Consumer Summit 2015, speaking about the changes happening to the media landscape and the challenges this presents media companies of today. In the first part of the presentation, Niko focused in on the issues surrounding the industry as a whole (see part 1), while in the second half, Nick North explained the steps the BBC has taken to keep up with the ever-evolving consumer trends, and what plans the organization has to cope with changes in the future.

    • 10/21/15
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • United Kingdom
    • English

    Putting the me in tomorrow’s media experience: the future of the BBC

    Some people have argued that the BBC’s role in the British Media has considerably diminished over the past few years, but as the organization still reaches 97% of the population every week, I believe it still has an important role to play. Furthermore, with competition from OTT services continually rising, old Auntie can’t afford to stand still and must ensure she retains her share of the market, especially among younger audiences.

    Some key changes in the market. As well as an erosion of the amount of time generations are spending with TV and Radio, audiences now also want to be ‘in control’ of their content. Thinking about TV viewing specifically, viewers want to decide when they watch something, how they watch it (all episodes of a series in one sitting) and how they are going to share it with friends and family.

    If we look at how Radio 1 was consumed 10 years ago, for example, the changes compared to today are remarkable. Where once shows were only listened to at specific times of the day, users can now choose to rewind bits of the show they missed, or just listen to it all again later; they can tune in to their favorite shows on the car radio, but they can also listen online through the app or the website (on a range of devices); podcasts are created on a daily basis and thousands of views are registered every day on the station’s YouTube channel.

    Moving away from radio, the BBC has been also experimenting (successfully) with Netflix-style TV launches, making a whole series of TV shows available to its users in one go. For example, the launch of Car Share was met with millions of iPlayer requests to stream/download each episode of the series, a much higher audience volume than would have been expected had the show been released offline.

    Many of the changes I’ve mentioned were incorporated by the BBC long before the majority of their competitors, so they have had time to refine their strategies, as well as providing the organization valuable learnings to take forward. But in my opinion, the most interesting move is how the BBC are using audience data to improve their services.

    Chart Beat is a tool the BBC currently employs to analyze traffic data across all of the BBC’s websites in real time. The News and Current Affairs team monitor which stories are performing well (or not so well) on BBC News website, and how they can instantly re-arrange the webpages to increase audience engagement. The second tool that was talked about was MyBBC. This new service, using data made available by users being signed in across the BBCs platforms, will eventually provide audiences with tailored content that helps them unlock even more value from the BBC which, in the long run, will increase overall satisfaction and loyalty to the organization.

    The BBC has previously anticipated industry changes and reacted by developing the necessary infrastructure to fully serve its audience. From what we have heard they are developing, and from seeing how they have adapted their delivery and content strategies in the past, I think we can be confident that the BBC will continue to evolve and find new ways to serve its existing audience, as well as finding new, innovative ways to serve the next generations of viewers, listeners, readers and browsers.

    Niko Waesche (Global Industry Lead of Media and Entertainment @ GfK) and Nick North (Director of Audiences @ BBC) shared the presenting duties in the penultimate keynote speech of the GfK Future Consumer Summit 2015, speaking about the changes happening to the media landscape and the challenges this presents media companies of today. In the first part of the presentation, Niko focused in on the issues surrounding the industry as a whole (see part 1), while in the second half, Nick North explained the steps the BBC has taken to keep up with the ever-evolving consumer trends, and what plans the organization has to cope with changes in the future.

    • 10/21/15
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • United States
    • English

    Putting the me in tomorrow’s media experience: the future of the BBC

    Some people have argued that the BBC’s role in the British Media has considerably diminished over the past few years, but as the organization still reaches 97% of the population every week, I believe it still has an important role to play. Furthermore, with competition from OTT services continually rising, old Auntie can’t afford to stand still and must ensure she retains her share of the market, especially among younger audiences.

    Some key changes in the market. As well as an erosion of the amount of time generations are spending with TV and Radio, audiences now also want to be ‘in control’ of their content. Thinking about TV viewing specifically, viewers want to decide when they watch something, how they watch it (all episodes of a series in one sitting) and how they are going to share it with friends and family.

    If we look at how Radio 1 was consumed 10 years ago, for example, the changes compared to today are remarkable. Where once shows were only listened to at specific times of the day, users can now choose to rewind bits of the show they missed, or just listen to it all again later; they can tune in to their favorite shows on the car radio, but they can also listen online through the app or the website (on a range of devices); podcasts are created on a daily basis and thousands of views are registered every day on the station’s YouTube channel.

    Moving away from radio, the BBC has been also experimenting (successfully) with Netflix-style TV launches, making a whole series of TV shows available to its users in one go. For example, the launch of Car Share was met with millions of iPlayer requests to stream/download each episode of the series, a much higher audience volume than would have been expected had the show been released offline.

    Many of the changes I’ve mentioned were incorporated by the BBC long before the majority of their competitors, so they have had time to refine their strategies, as well as providing the organization valuable learnings to take forward. But in my opinion, the most interesting move is how the BBC are using audience data to improve their services.

    Chart Beat is a tool the BBC currently employs to analyze traffic data across all of the BBC’s websites in real time. The News and Current Affairs team monitor which stories are performing well (or not so well) on BBC News website, and how they can instantly re-arrange the webpages to increase audience engagement. The second tool that was talked about was MyBBC. This new service, using data made available by users being signed in across the BBCs platforms, will eventually provide audiences with tailored content that helps them unlock even more value from the BBC which, in the long run, will increase overall satisfaction and loyalty to the organization.

    The BBC has previously anticipated industry changes and reacted by developing the necessary infrastructure to fully serve its audience. From what we have heard they are developing, and from seeing how they have adapted their delivery and content strategies in the past, I think we can be confident that the BBC will continue to evolve and find new ways to serve its existing audience, as well as finding new, innovative ways to serve the next generations of viewers, listeners, readers and browsers.

    Niko Waesche (Global Industry Lead of Media and Entertainment @ GfK) and Nick North (Director of Audiences @ BBC) shared the presenting duties in the penultimate keynote speech of the GfK Future Consumer Summit 2015, speaking about the changes happening to the media landscape and the challenges this presents media companies of today. In the first part of the presentation, Niko focused in on the issues surrounding the industry as a whole (see part 1), while in the second half, Nick North explained the steps the BBC has taken to keep up with the ever-evolving consumer trends, and what plans the organization has to cope with changes in the future.

    • 10/19/15
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    Evaluating the impact of print advertising

    A few weeks ago we had the pleasure of presenting alongside our client, Times Media, in South Africa at their roadshow, The Future is Now. The General Manager of Group Sales and Marketing, Trevor Ormerod, discussed some of the company’s key initiatives including recent work to measure print ad effectiveness using our Starch tool.

    For those not acquainted with the approach, Starch delivers impact metrics for print ads alongside insight into the readers’ involvement with the publications and its advertising. The core metrics include “noted” (did the readers remember the ads?), “associated” (did they know what brand was associated with the ad?), “read any” and “read most ratings” (measures of ad engagement), and actions taken as a result of ad exposure.

    For some years, Starch scores have been used by print sales executives and media planners as part of an ongoing dialogue about the value of advertising. The data allows publishers, agencies and advertisers to answer key questions, such as “does the size of an ad make a difference on its effectiveness?”

    To date for this project in South Africa we have surveyed almost 2,500 readers of Times Media newspapers and gathered information about 59 ads across three titles. Our findings are good news for the print industry – in short, print advertising penetrates consumer awareness and leads to consumer action. In a world where print is continually under threat from other media such as digital, these results show that print can be considered the “haute couture” of advertising.

    Bigger is better

    According to our work with Times Media, on average bigger is indeed better when it comes to print ads. Adverts that take up less than half a page were noted just over half of the time (54 percent). In comparison, full page ads were noted 71 percent of the time and multi-page displays 86 percent of the time. Additionally, almost all (96 percent) of those who remembered the multi-page ads also indicated that they engaged with the ad content. In other words, they read at least some of the content within the advert. This is evidence of positive impact for advertisers contemplating larger investments with larger sized ads.

    Almost half of consumers who see an ad take action as a result

    So, do consumers take action as a result of exposure to an ad? According to our research, almost one half (44 percent) of those who remember an ad take some action as a consequence. However, what consumers do as a result of noticing an ad varies: 14 percent look for further information, 14 percent have a more favorable opinion of the brand, 14 percent consider making a purchase and 12 percent visit the company’s website. While just a small number will make a purchase directly as a result of seeing an ad, these results show that print ads nudge consumers along the purchase journey.

    For print ads size matters

    One key result from this project so far reaffirms what print execs have long suspected – that size matter. What our South African data demonstrates so far – and this corresponds to our findings in other markets such as the United States – is that larger sized ads tend to capture the attention of readers at a higher rate.

    Clearly research like this is of great benefit to the South African market, and our client Times Media agrees. So happily, we will be continuing the Starch surveys for the remainder of 2015.

    By its nature, advertising will always be both an art and a science, but the introduction of some much needed empirical evidence into the effectiveness (or otherwise) of print advertising should be warmly welcomed by professionals across the industry.

    For more information please contact Michal Galin at michal.galin@gfk.com.

    Read the article in The Media Online

    • 10/18/15
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    Putting the me in tomorrow’s media experience: Using data differently

    Today’s media companies are not using data as effectively as they could be. This is what was argued during the first half of this presentation. The role of data in media companies has created ‘unhappy sandpits’, and trying to aggregate the various silos of data across the industry has proved tricky, creating further obstacles and challenges for the companies involved.

    Many companies outside of the media industry have developed sophisticated DMPs (data management platforms) that allow them to efficiently utilize all the data they collect about their users and consumers. Amazon, who are involved in everything from e-commerce to VOD (video-on-demand) to smart-home technology, are particularly effective at doing just that, and can perfect their targeting based on data sourced from a variety of industries.

    Some companies inside the media industry currently do use data in smart ways. For example, Netflix have built a dynamic recommendation system that really understands its viewers content preferences. By continually serving up users the ‘right’ content, they increased engagement with the platform and help improve satisfaction levels. However, even though recommendation systems do exist on other media platforms, they don’t match the quality of the Netflix software. Furthermore, media companies perhaps focus too much resource on sub-standard recommendation systems, and not enough time on using data to improve cross-selling of services or other e-commerce products (shirts, DVDs etc.). Audience data is just not currently being used to its full potential within the industry.

    At the end of the day, it is these audiences who will decide how the industry will look in the future, as they adopt more OTT services and control how much information they share or don’t share with companies. Their decisions in these areas will dictate how much data-capital the industry has to play with, and will consequently draw the parameters of possibilities for all the companies involved.

    Niko Waesche (Global Industry Lead of Media and Entertainment @ GfK) and Nick North (Director of Audiences @ BBC) shared the presenting duties in the penultimate keynote speech of the GfK Future Consumer Summit 2015, speaking about the changes happening to the media landscape and the challenges this presents media companies of today. In the first part of the presentation, Niko focused in on the issues surrounding the industry as a whole, while in the second half, Nick North explained the steps the BBC has taken to keep up with the ever-evolving consumer trends, and what plans the organization has to cope with changes in the future (see part 2).

General