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  • A quarter of the online population does gardening or yard work at least once a week
    • 08/23/17
    • Global Study
    • Global
    • English

    A quarter of the online population does gardening or yard work at least once a week

    Explore our infographic and find out more.

  • Global study: frequency of gardening or yard work
    • 08/23/17
    • Global Study
    • Global
    • English

    Global study: frequency of gardening or yard work

    Garden centers should target people aged 30-39 and those with children under 12, according to our latest survey. Explore our fill findings.

    • 08/23/17
    • Technology
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Digital disruption: Will Hyper-Connected Consumers revolutionize the rural market trends in India?

    Today we are living in a digitally connected world ruled by the millennials, Hyper-Connected Consumers who are creative, realistic, ambitious and eagerly looking for innovation. These consumers look for ease, comfort and something extra-ordinary in every product and service they buy. And to help brands communicate well with the Hyper-Connected Consumer, the government of India has seriously taken a path towards achieving the dream of making the country digitally connected.

    With a plethora of opportunities that Digital India brings to the table, it has become imperative for companies to have an in-depth understanding of how to make the best use of it and deal with today’s Hyper-Connected Consumer.

    The rural consumer

    Further, as the digital divide is being minimized at a rapid pace to bring rural areas into the mainstream, the rural consumer has also become smarter and so have the channel partners/brands. Hyper-Connected Consumers in rural markets are ready to experience innovative retail concepts like mobile payment. Brands are therefore looking to create an end-to-end, relevant marketing strategy to effectively tap into rural and semi-urban geographies.

    Amazingly, early in the game, HUL gave a technology boost to rural marketing. Its Project Shakti enhanced its direct rural reach and created livelihood opportunities for underprivileged women by making them hyper localized distributors of its products, selling directly to villagers and retailers. If you look at the Indian telecom sector; free voice calls, drop in data tariffs, sharp competition among Indian telecom companies and finally the dramatic entry of Reliance Jio has caused massive disruptions in the recent past. And now Jio is all set to launch a discount handset in a bid to further expand its customer-base.

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    Interestingly, Facebook sponsors free Wi-Fi hot spots across India. It has “2G Tuesdays” in its Menlo Park headquarters, where developers can experience a slow connection and how Facebook works on it. This clearly demonstrates how consumer experience in the world of hyper-connectivity affects the business model.

    A few years ago, Idea Cellular launched an initiative called ‘Har Mobile Par Internet’ (Internet on every mobile) which was an extension to its popular ‘No ullu banaoing’ (Do Not Fool) campaign. This service provided step-by-step digital literacy lessons via IVR (Interactive Voice Response); a tutorial designed to teach consumers how to access and use the net on feature phones. Such various contemporary technologies have found their way into the arsenal of rural marketers across the country. In brief, a disruptive business model is a prized corporate asset.

    A society in transition

    As India transitions from a ‘cash based’ society to a ‘cash less’ society, digital applications such as mobile wallets and UPI have become indispensable. The government’s initiatives around Jan Dhan accounts and cash transfer of benefits allowed the un-banked to be banked. Further initiatives around ‘Bharatnet’, smart cities and WiFi’ing villages will be the catalyst in empowering Indian citizens to transact digitally, henceforth, pushing semi-urban and rural communities to become digital savvy.

    All these developments mark the start of a new era of disruption as businesses in India seek to serve the growing segment of Hyper-Connected consumers who have a disproportionate impact on both influencers and value creation. We are excited to share insights on this unique consumer segment based on a custom featured study and exchanging perspectives with a panel of industry leaders. Join us and be part of the conversation to Discover, Disrupt and Delight in the era of the Hyper-Connected Consumers in India on September 7, 2017 in Mumbai at Hotel Sofitel.

    Nikhil Mathur is the Managing Director of GfK, South Asia. To share your thoughts, please email Nikhil.mathur@gfk.com or leave a comment below.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    • 08/22/17
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    A new wrinkle in over-the-top TV services: vMVPDs not so virtual anymore

    In the ever-changing world of delivering video to TVs and homes, real bellwether moments can sometimes slip by us. But the appearance on the scene of the awkwardly named vMVPDs (virtual multichannel video programming distributors) could well be such a moment.  These “skinny bundle” services offer a variety of broadcast and cable networks via on-demand streaming — and at least some channels are available to stream “live” when broadcast.

    The potential of this new OTT wrinkle is huge. Delivering live programming and events as they happen has been a key differentiator for traditional pay TV services as they try to fend off streaming service providers. Now, services like DirecTV NOW, Sling TV, and PlayStation Vue can begin to offer competing live programming – the opening of a potential floodgate in video media.

    Innovation worth watching

    We measured vMVPDs for the first time this year in our long-running The Home Technology Monitor™. The new Ownership and Trend Report shows that 3% of TV homes subscribe to one of the vMVPDs listed above. (It was too early to measure either Hulu with Live TV or YouTube TV).

    Now, three percent may seem like a “blip” if there ever was one – but every real innovation has to start somewhere. And this one in the media industry has definitely found to be worth watching.

    That is why we decided to collect additional information on vMVPD homes — but, as there were only 82 of them, consider the following to be directional findings, not definitive. Looking at those homes which report DirecTV NOW, Sling TV or Playstation Vue subscriptions, we find very similar levels of adoption among the three – there is not a dominant player at this point in time by any means.

    Who is subscribing to vMVPD services?

    Perhaps most interesting is where these vMVPD homes came from, in terms of reception. A small minority – just one in six – of these homes were “uncorded” before subscribing to their vMVPD service. Half cancelled regular pay TV service. And almost exactly one-third report they also have “regular” pay TV service.  And all report having a TV set and almost all say they stream to a TV set in some manner. Thus the vMVPD home is far from the cord-cutting, TV-less home some may have expected.

    However, if one counts vMVPD homes in the same bucket as “pay TV” – something on which there was not a consensus from our Home Technology Monitor subscribers – then the pay TV home decrease is offset, and its level holds relatively steady compared with last year. This is a definite silver lining in these difficult days for cable networks, if not their traditional MVPD partners.

    An improved user experience for viewers?

    vMVPDs with live TV will likely remain a hot topic in 2017,  as additional competitors join in — whether streaming-first brands (Hulu and YouTube) or, as rumored, traditional MVPD services. These services are banking on consumers accepting a smaller selection of networks and the promise of an improved viewer user experience compared with traditional providers.

    While vMVPDs will certainly be of interest to a sizable viewer niche, expansion outside the obvious Cord Cutters/Cord Never targets will require a high level of consumer satisfaction and the ability to deliver desired content. People may have many complaints about their interactions with their cable providers and their costs, the actual delivery of television to the home by pay TV tends to be very reliable – which can’t always be said for video streaming. We also see many local TV markets are still unserved by the new “live TV” streaming from broadcast networks because of affiliate agreements – the network O&Os are available, but availability outside of those markets is still sparse.

    But these are still early days, and several more years will likely be needed to accurately assess the long-term traction of vMVPD-type services. With several notable players all in on vMVPDs (Hulu, YouTube, AT&T, DISH and Sony) and several notables sitting it out (Amazon, Apple), it will certainly make for an interesting period for researchers, competitors and consumers.

    Get similar insights – and many more – as soon as they get published by subscribing to The Home Technology Monitor in 2017. Aside from our annual Ownership and Trend Report, our report topics this year include Commanding Media (voice commands), Over-the-Top TV, TV Everywhere and SVOD Digital Purchase Journey.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Whitepaper: Six steps to getting your online pricing right
    • 08/22/17
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Promotion and Causal Retail
    • Global
    • English

    Whitepaper: Six steps to getting your online pricing right

    Download our white paper in which we’ve identified six core activities that you need to master in order to make the right pricing decisions.

  • Jutta Suchanek and Benjamin Jones join GfK’s Executive Leadership Team
    • 08/21/17
    • Press
    • Global
    • English

    Jutta Suchanek and Benjamin Jones join GfK’s Executive Leadership Team

    GfK appoints Jutta Suchanek and Benjamin Jones as members of the Executive Leadership Team in where both will take on newly created roles.

    • 08/16/17
    • Health
    • Consumer Panels
    • Global
    • English

    Curating an answer to deeper consumer understanding through data

    This post was co-authored by Natasha Stevens and Michelle Morgan

    At a time when surveys seem to be under a kind of siege – viewed by some as backward and outdated – let me go out on a limb: Surveys have never been more important or relevant.

    Yes, behavioral data can tell us exactly what people do – no guessing or memory jogging required. But there are also restrictions; we may only know, for example, what people are doing within a single environment – online or in store. And while behavioral information can provide extremely rich consumer insight, it often cannot tell us why people do things: what they were hoping for, whether they were disappointed, and their feelings about the brands in their lives.

    The challenge for researchers

    Surveys can help us fill in all of these gaps; and yet we also know that consumers’ patience with long questionnaires – especially on smartphones – is shrinking. The challenge for smart researchers, then, is: How can we use surveys only when they will provide unique and indispensable information, but quit before our returns start to diminish?

    The answer is doubling down on a skill unfamiliar (and perhaps unsettling) to many researchers — data curation. Here we use different data sets, often from very diverse sources, to create the complete picture we need of consumers’ preferences and behavior. By linking two or more data sets through carefully developed criteria, we can focus our survey takers on giving us only the information we can obtain nowhere else.

    Data curation in action

    One recent example of data curation in action was inspired by the looming changes in US healthcare and insurance. Survey data capturing public opinion on US healthcare reform is abundant – much of it focused on the specifics of the policy itself, with respondents generally profiled according to their political affiliation. We wanted to develop a profile of survey respondents that went beyond party politics and looked more deeply at motivations and personal characteristics around health.

    Using KnowledgePanel®, the largest probability-based online panel in the US, supplemented with key health psychographic variables from MRI’s gold-standard Survey of the American Consumer®, we were able to develop a more nuanced picture of our survey takers. The MRI-KnowledgePanel® fusion allowed us to integrate health-related profile data for KnowledgePanel® members – such as body mass index (BMI), information about chronic physical and mental health conditions, and health insurance status – with 25 health psychographic variables from MRI.

    We found that those who disapprove of the Affordable Care Act are less likely to believe that generic drugs are as good as brand-name drugs.

    In addition, they are more likely to be the first to try advanced medication and more likely to agree that medication has improved their quality of life.

    Using the integrated databases, we were able to add a number of high-value characteristics to the mix without additional questions or fees; these included presence of chronic health conditions, medication compliance, body-mass index, and body image.

    Deeper insights from fused data

    By mastering data integration and curation, we can deepen our insights from any one source. In our healthcare example, the fused data allowed us to develop a richer and more robust profile of survey respondents than we could achieve with KnowledgePanel® data alone. With the right data resources and expertise, this new approach creates almost infinite possibilities for expanded insights.

    Natasha Stevens is Executive Vice President of Digital Experiences at GfK. Michelle Morgan is the Research Director of Data and Insights Integration. To share your thoughts please email natasha.stevens@gfk.com or michelle.morgan@gfk.com. 

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    • 08/14/17
    • Retail
    • Consumer Goods
    • Global
    • English

    4 things your brand is missing out on without an online store finder

    According to a 2017 study on ecommerce trends, 61% of shoppers are more likely to research brands before making a purchase. So while shoppers are on your site, it’s important to keep them there and give them more of a reason to buy your products. One strategic way of doing this is to capitalize on using a store finder or ‘where to buy’ application on your website. Besides what may seem obvious with this function (giving customers information into where they can buy your products), there are some other key benefits your brand may be missing out on if not installed.

    Lost sales due to comparison shopping

    Many brands lose business to competitors through comparison shopping. In a 2017 survey, 71% of shoppers believe they will get a better deal online than in stores, so it’s likely that they are going to shop around for the best one. Having a store finder that displays pricing and stock information for other retailers can help sales tremendously as it keeps potential buyers from starting a product search on a marketplace where they can compare and find competitive products.

    Tip: Make sure your store finder technology is able to list pricing and stocking info in real-time so that you are giving our customers the most accurate and up-to-date info.

    Value-Added convenience

    Today’s digitally connected and multi-channel shopping consumers always seem to be on the go either by surfing the web or physically out shopping. By having a store finder application on your website you are providing your shoppers with all the right ways to buy your products – your website, in store, or through other online channels. And by displaying all pricing, inventory and location information this is a major convenience that helps save your customer’s time and you are helping your customers find retailers who they may already be loyal to.

    Tip: For further convenience, it is essential that your store finder is responsive for those mobile shoppers and can be geo-targeted to their location so that location results are showing near-buy retailers.

    Channel support

    Although not customer facing, by having a store finder that lists the location, pricing and stocking info of your key retailers, you’re offering more support to your channel partners. And if you are a brand that doesn’t have a shopping cart on your website to support resellers, a store finder is even more valuable to your business and your channel relationships. Eliminate cart abandonment due to comparison shopping and keep them coming back with a positive shopping experience.

    A better online shopping experience

    Enhancing your product detail pages with quality product content and images all make for a good online shopping experience, which can lead to sales. With the added convenience and functionality of a store finder, your product detail pages are set up for an even greater experience that can help keep customers coming back to your site, no matter the stage of their buying journey.

    Tip: Ensure you are able to use your store finder technology to its full potential by tracking performance metrics.

    When set-up with all the right information such as, real-time pricing and inventory, geo-targeting, and a responsive design, a store finder just may be the ultimate product closing tool.

    Interested in adding a store finder or looking for other options? As a product content company, GfK Etilize has all of the data to easily crawl and match products with different identifiers on popular retail sites, to always show accurate products and inventory. We also automate the addition of new products as launches happen, to maximize sales on newer, best-selling SKUs.

    • 08/11/17
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    How is the smartphone transforming brick and mortar retail?

    When we think about how smartphones have changed the retail landscape, it often revolves around how e-commerce is banishing traditional brick-and-mortar establishments to obsolescence. At least, that’s what you would gather from sensational news reports about the current mall crisis in the US and the shutdown of several local stores in Singapore such as furniture store, iwannagohome and fashion brand, Raoul.

    Here’s a story that’s less newsworthy, but equally true.

    Rather than being the harbinger of doom and gloom of physical retailers, the smartphone also has enormous potential to transform physical retail for the better. The smartphone has made shopping a breeze with apps for fashion, groceries, electronics and food, with the likes of Zalora, Lazada, Redmart and Honestbee.

    If implemented effectively as part of an omnichannel marketing strategy, smartphones could somewhat ironically be the key to survival for physical retail outlets.

    For the uninitiated, the idea of omnichannel marketing is simple. Brands need to provide customers with a seamless experience, regardless of channel or device. Whether it’s in-store, online, via social media or through a smartphone app, the consumer’s experience should be consistent and complementary.

    A one-size fits all approach does not work though, as shoppers behave differently by country. That’s why it’s essential for retailers to have market research intelligence on shopper needs and behavior, to tailor retail strategies for the local market.

    Smartphones have enhanced our lives

    In our 2016 Connected Consumers Report, we referred to the smartphone as the ‘hub of the consumer’s life’ – a nexus where their offline lives meet their digital ones.

    Smartphones are the top choice for online shopping (it used to be the desktop) as they give shoppers numerous benefits and convenience. Our research shows that 45% of all shopping is influenced by mobile, and without having to enter the physical stores, shoppers can avoid queues, order ahead and enjoy customized offers.

    Smartphones are also beneficial for e-commerce sites that want to move offline, for example Amazon – which has recently been making headlines for opening bookstores and grocery stores. Amazon has been using mobile technology to track customer preferences and sales, and enabling shoppers to grab groceries and walk out of the store as the order gets posted to the shopper’s Amazon account later. Closer to Singapore, we’ve seen homegrown brands like Naiise, HipVan and Love Bonito extend their online presence offline in shopping malls. Naiise for example, offers self-collection services at its physical stores for online orders.

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    The role of smartphones in consumer retail

    In our global survey on consumers’ activities with mobile phones in stores, we found that globally, 40 percent of shoppers use their smartphones while in a physical store to compare prices and contact a friend for advice, while 23 percent and 22 percent buy products through an app or through a website respectively, proving that once customers step through the door, even more can be done to seal the deal.

    Beauty retailer Sephora for example, has successfully used augmented reality and lip-mapping technology in it’s app – Sephora Virtual Artist, to instantly and effortlessly help users figure out which of 3,000 lipsticks shades suits them most – a typically time consuming task.

    Singapore shopping malls such as 313@Somerset and Parkway Parade have been experimenting with proximity marketing and mobile location analytics to reach out to shoppers who are surfing nearby, in a more targeted manner while showcasing offerings effectively. Through proximity alerts, patrons are able to enjoy exclusive deals, purchase and redeem their items immediately.

    Winning consumers with customized mobile services

    One of the most valuable resources of a smartphone is that it can provide retailers with information, which is key to capturing brand loyalty – a trait that today’s spoiled-for-choice Connected Consumers are lacking.

    Brands can leverage customer data and point-of-sales (POS) analytics to offer more personalized services such as customized offers. In turn, this presents an opportunity to generate long-term relationships.

    AsiaMalls for example, which owns six heartland malls, has seen success with AMperkz, its card-less loyalty program that enables personalized and location-based rewards and exclusive member offers.

    Starbucks too, has seen massive success in the past six years by taking its popular loyalty program to the mobile platform, resulting in higher sales, customer loyalty and foot traffic. Last year, 25 percent of the chain’s transactions in the United States were from a smartphone.

    Mobile Order & Pay, the company’s mobile order-ahead service has been lauded for providing convenience, but the code behind it – the data-driven algorithm to predict, personalize and recommend individual offerings at checkout shouldn’t be understated either as it’s a data-driven Artificial Intelligence (AI) algorithm based on consumers’ preferences and behavior; and behaviors that Starbucks is trying to drive.

    In the age of the Connected Consumer, omnichannel shopping is becoming the new normal. Therefore, understanding the shopper’s purchase journey is crucial – and this is one of the toughest challenges faced by retailers today. However, armed with research insights on the route shoppers take when making a purchase, ways in which different online and offline touchpoints influence their purchase decision, and the type of media they are exposed to; retailers can optimize their omnichannel strategy.

    Karthik Venkatakrishnan is Regional Director at GfK. To share your thoughts, please email karthik.venkatakrishnan@gfk.com or leave a comment below.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Map of the month: Sales area productivity, Europe 2016
    • 08/10/17
    • Retail
    • Geomarketing
    • RegioGraph
    • Geodata
    • Picture of the month
    • Global
    • English

    Map of the month: Sales area productivity, Europe 2016

    Growth in sales area productivity (gross retail turnover per m2) is an important gauge of market health for retailers looking to expand to new regions. In 2016, sales area productivity grew by 0.9% in the EU-27 (this excludes the UK due to the exchange rate disparity). Luxembourg, Switzerland, Norway, and Sweden top the rankings, but retailers can also prosper in countries with lower values, but less market saturation. Various factors influence sales area productivity, including retail format, brand strength, location quality, competitor presence, and the available purchasing power of the population.

    • 08/09/17
    • Retail
    • Automotive
    • Mystery Shopping
    • Global
    • English

    Crowdsourcing versus Mystery Shopping – sometimes the quick answer suffices

    Whether you’re a retailer trying to push through a new service initiative or a manufacturer launching a new product, all your hard work and investment can quickly unravel if your in-store activation misses the mark.

    Gleaning fast early-launch feedback of what is happening at the point of sale is critical, so that key elements can be tweaked, re-communicated or corrected to ensure a successful launch.

    With this ever-present challenge, it’s no surprise that most major brands employ some form of in-store mystery shopping activity, to gain that quantitative and qualitative read of performance.

    Although mystery shopping may go in and out of fashion, it is still arguably the single best methodology for understanding exactly what is happening on the shop floor and identifying problems.

    However, there is also increasing demand for fast turnaround data on retail performance – and this has triggered increasing use of ‘crowdsourced audits’ alongside traditional mystery shopping against a smaller number of metrics and across less defined samples.

    When to use crowdsourced audits and when to use mystery shopping

    On-trade product launches are typically prime candidates for the use of quick-fire checks (crowdsourced audits), rather than statistically representative studies (mystery shopping).

    A product manager who wants to understand how one bar chain is promoting and serving his new product versus another bar chain requires the statistical certainty of a mystery shopping program. But, in early stage launches, sometimes the overriding need can be as simple as quickly assessing whether your product is actually present.

    In our mystery shopping programs, we regularly uncover distribution issues, or stock still sitting in backrooms and out of date POS/promotions bearing no link whatsoever to a scheduled launch. In this instance, a fast random coverage of the market is what is needed, rather than an all-singing, all-dancing robust sample exercise.

    This is where crowdsourced audits come into their own as a measurement methodology.  In essence, these are a variant of mystery shopping, based on wide-coverage, untrained panels of everyday consumers who can ‘pick up’ assignments based on their proximity to locations and conduct quick turnaround simple ‘checks’.

    For example, checking specific promotions and activations, product availability, pricing or a simple recommendation across a non-fixed sample of stores is ideal territory for crowdsourced audits. They are essentially fast turnaround checks without the robustness of a representative sample.

    The ability to feedback quickly with both objective responses and photos means client teams can get that all-important early read and work out if there are any launch issues to be addressed.

    Conclusion

    The critical factor is that the agency you choose must have the experience to know when the ‘crowdsourced audit’ route is appropriate, and when a more comprehensive mystery shop approach is needed. The tipping point can be quite small, but will have big implications on the resultant data and level of insight.

    We employ both methodologies and increasingly are providing clients with a blended approach in order to best deliver the whole story in the most cost effective way.

    Both techniques can be fast turnarounds and both can provide photo capture with GPS stamping but, in its simplest terms, the differentiation revolves around the complexity of the task and the type of sample needing to be covered.

    As such it’s no great surprise that mystery shopping is the primary solution in sectors such as Banking and Automotive, where we measure high involvement and detailed purchases, but when it comes to high street retail and simple product recommendation checks, the blended solution becomes very relevant.

    Whether it’s a quick answer or more comprehensive measure, marketers and product managers have a far greater range of solutions to call upon and it’s the job of the agencies to properly assess the need and find the best fit.

    Oli Bailey is the Development Director of Mystery Shopping at GfK. To share your thoughts, please email oli.bailey@gfk.com or leave a comment below.

    • 08/07/17
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Point of Sales Tracking
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Retail Trend Monitor 2017: Technology will make the difference in retail

    Changes in the retail landscape, driven in part by the mobile revolution and resulting changes in consumer shopping preferences, have revealed new opportunities for retailers. However, with many of the arising opportunities requiring significant investment in technology, the challenge for retailers is knowing which of these to invest in to secure future success.

    A phased approach to retail technology investment

    Those technologies that will help retailers to meet current and future consumer trends and expectations can be classified according to two distinct groups, reflecting a phased approach to retail technology investment:

    One: Those technological developments with a high relevance today and which will remain the focus of investment in the future. These include big data analytics (relating to both consumers and the supply chain) and mobile capabilities like shopping apps.

    Two: Those technological innovations that have lower relevance today, but which are predicted to become the focus of future investment. It is by anticipating the most influential technologies of tomorrow that retailers can stay one step ahead of the competition. Examples of such technologies include check-out less stores, and virtual and augmented reality.

    These were the findings of our Retail Trend Monitor 2017, a 51-country online survey of 346 retailers and industry experts. The study examines the technologies in which retailers should invest in the context of exploring those key retail trends that are having the most impact now and those that will have the greatest influence in the future.

    Retail trends having the most impact today and tomorrow

    According to the retailers who participated in our study, the convenience of the shopping experience (89%) is the leading driver of current retail developments but personalized marketing and the seamlessness of the cross-channel experience will gain in relevance.

    While they anticipate mobile communication to be the top driver in the future owing to the growing popularity of shopping anytime and anywhere, they also expect convenience to remain a dominant force. Convenience underpins many of the other drivers of change and innovations in the retail space. Closely related to anything that makes consumers’ lives easier, the concept of convenience is however constantly evolving. Today, of course, it is closely associated with mobile retail. However, according to the retail experts who participated in our study, the future of convenience will be about retailers themselves providing greater transparency of information (e.g. price comparison/review websites and social media). What’s more, it will be about them offering a seamless shopping experience across channels, and personalized marketing information and offers.

    Future success is founded on having the right retail insights

    Convenience and personalization will play a major role in shaping the future of retail. Achieving a more convenient and personalized shopping experience, one that meets consumers’ expectations, is dependent on choosing the right retail format and investing in the right technology. With the right intelligence, retailers have the opportunity to not only address but also exceed consumers’ expectations, thereby surprising and delighting them. Those retailers that achieve this will be the success stories of today and tomorrow.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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General