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Ideas Inteligentes: Viajes y Turismo

Las compañías del sector se enfrentan a una competencia intensa, motivada por una oferta masiva, con un mercado y demanda cada vez más fragmentados y un consumidor que exige que los servicios sean ofrecidos a través de diversos canales.

Para alcanzar y mantener un buen posicionamiento dentro de este contexto, es necesario contar con una inteligencia de mercado capaz de captar, procesar y analizar grandes volúmenes de datos procedentes de distintas fuentes de información (Big Data) para los diferentes canales y áreas del sector viajes. Todo ello obtenido de manera integrada y filtrada para así proporcionar ideas inteligentes que permitan potenciar la toma de decisiones de negocio exitosas. 

GfK es el único instituto de investigación en el mundo que proporciona información sobre viajes, turismo y hoteles basada en datos de reservas reales obtenidas a partir de la colaboración de miles de puntos de venta (agencias y turoperadores tanto on como off line, en todos los dispositivos), todo ello ligado a un profundo conocimiento de la industria por parte de nuestros expertos.

Esta combinación proporciona a nuestros clientes una clara comprensión de qué está sucediendo y por qué a lo largo de todo el proceso de compra, desde el primer contacto hasta la transacción final, en todos los nichos de la industria.

Bien se trate de una aerolínea, una cadena hotelera, una agencia de viajes, un organismo de promoción turística, un operador de cruceros o empresa de logística, GfK es capaz de monitorizar el comportamiento de sus clientes en todos los puntos de contacto y así mostrarle los factores y experiencias clave que determinan las decisiones de los viajeros dentro del sector viajes y turismo.

GfK, Peru
Avenida Jorge Basadre 990, San Isidro, Lima
+51 1 206 2300
Últimas tendencias

Aquí puede encontrar las últimas tendencias del sector turístico y hotelero. Siga leyendo

    • 04/16/18
    • Technology
    • Travel and Hospitality
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global
    • English

    Tapping into people’s need to take a break

    I had two friends who posted on Facebook recently within hours of each other. One had spent the day at a theme park with her family, all of whom left their phones “in the car ON purpose. Best way to enjoy the day together!” The other had been sharing many stunning photos of a vacation in Egypt; yet on the last day, she decided not to take photos but “just to see with my own eyes.” This is hardly surprising. “Experiences are more important than possessions” perpetually ranks among the highest-rated attitudinal statements in the annual GfK Consumer Life global study. It ranks seventh out of 42 statements listed. It also ranks third for teenagers 15-19 and in Canada. Taking a tech break It is certainly ironic that my friends talked about their tech breaks on social media, yet this reflects the mixed feelings many people have toward technology. Yes, it helps us do many things we could never do before, but people are increasingly recognizing its addictive nature as a real problem. This is something that we warned about two years ago when we found that Technology Leading Edge Consumers were in the forefront of being concerned about this drawback to technology. Fully 45% of global consumers belonging to this early adopter group agreed “I find it difficult to take a break from technology, even when I know I should,” 13 points higher than average. Taking a tech break can be easier said than done, of course, and going cold turkey isn’t necessarily the answer. Some brands take a hybrid approach by promoting tech use specifically to make time for real life. For example, Citi is promoting its mobile app with a cute dad-and-kids ad and the slogan “spend the moments in the moment.” The Pocket Points app motivates students to focus on classes; when they lock their phones while on campus, they earn rewards points for local and online merchants. Another approach is to take a complete if temporary break from tech. Musician Jack White has banned phones from his upcoming concert tour because he “wants people to live in the moment.” Organizations such as the YMCA and Boy Scouts encourage families to help children take a tech break. The Story Inn goes a step further with its slogan “One Inconvenient Location Since 1851.” The Inn is actually a cluster of buildings in a virtual ghost town in Indiana that offers lodgings, dining, and a venue for special events. Rooms are billed as “One Distraction-Free, Tranquil Escape” and have been converted from the likes of a one-room schoolhouse, carriage house, and grain mill. They don’t have TVs, phones or internet service. Taking a real-life break Vacations represent a different kind of break, a pause from the real life that so many people find stressful. Destinations like Walt Disney World epitomize this type of experience on a grand scale, but an infinite number of products and services can offer mini-breaks at any time and anywhere. The Rituals home- and body-care brand emphasizes the benefits of incorporating soothing experiences into everyday life. “They are the seemingly meaningless moments we all tend to overlook. Rituals unveils these moments and reminds you to experience them with joy.” L.L. Bean encourages people to “live every day like it’s the weekend.” Then there is literal escapism – the phenomenon of escape rooms, a hybrid of team role-playing and the classic locked-room mystery. Although not for everyone (such as those with claustrophobia), they can provide respite for problem-solving thrill seekers. Most people prefer more serene escapes, however. The share of respondents to a GfK Consumer Life global survey who prefer a relaxing vacation over an active one is 62%, up 7 points from 2012. Photos submitted by respondents indicate that sandy beaches top the list of places where people like to relax, followed by other outdoor venues such as forests, lakes, gardens and parks. We don’t need research to tell us that nature makes us feel good, but in fact, research does bear this out. And yes, video games provide escapism, too, but it’s important to keep in mind that most people still don’t view virtual experiences on par with the real thing. Just 30% of global consumers agree that “virtual interactions with people and places can be as good as being there in person,” ranking it #40 among 42 attitudinal statements. Conclusion Virtually every product and service can tap into people’s desire for experiences, whether they be social or solitary, physical or intellectual, tech or non-tech. The key is to understand precisely what kind of experience your customers crave. hbspt.cta.load(2405078, 'f959b7ac-800c-45ab-bd5f-350e588da27a', {});
    • 01/30/18
    • Press
    • Travel and Hospitality
    • Global
    • English

    Paris continues its reign as highest-rated city

    The latest Anholt-GfK City Brands IndexSM (CBISM) reveals that Paris retains its position at the top. 
    • 11/22/17
    • Health
    • Travel and Hospitality
    • Global
    • English

    What does living ‘the good life’ really mean? Hear it from consumers

    When we think about “living the dream” or “living the good life”, we usually think about health, family, work, experiences and finances.  But what is really the most important in the eyes of consumers, and how do those factors stack up against each other? This was the focus of our most recently published global study, where we asked thousands of consumers around the world about which factors they personally see as being an essential part of ‘the good life’ or the life they’d like to have.  Would the results differ by age group or from country to country?  And have any new trends emerged this year? Here are the factors in order of international popularity, according to consumers.

    Top factors internationally

    As seen above, the top ranking factors internationally for being part of “the good life” are good health, financial security, and free time/leisure time, followed by a happy marriage, the ability to travel for leisure, owning a home, control over one’s own life and a job that is interesting. What’s also revealing is the factors that rank lower on the list, such as children, spiritual enrichment, having a nice yard and a lawn, and having a luxury car or second car. For brands and marketers, the results of this global study have implications on the future and what consumers value most.  Are your products and services aligned with the consumer’s vision of their ideal life?  What kind of messaging and advertising will resonate best with consumers and which products and services have the most increasing or decreasing mass appeal? In digging a little deeper, we see that there are variances for each age bracket, with younger age groups seeing a college education as more essential to the good life, and older age groups placing more emphasis on financial security.  Clearly, those with more life experience value the security blanket that health and wealth provides, whereas it could be argued that the younger demographic trends more toward prioritizing accumulating those life experiences.

    What are the differences regionally?

    To help identify specific market opportunities, we offer a country by country breakdown of the results from our global study. Financial security, which is the second highest ranking factor internationally, has the most resonance with consumers in Russia, followed by Germany and Belgium.  On the other hand, when it comes to travelling for leisure as part of the good life, Argentina takes the lead, followed by Brazil and Spain.

    What this means for brands

    So what does it really mean to live the good life, and how can businesses respond?  As consumers internationally increasingly value time and experiences over materials and possessions, balanced with more practical factors like good health and financial security, they will continue to look to brands to help them achieve the life they’d like to have.  The brands that are able to deliver on fulfilling this promise will live “the good life” of their own, with a healthy business, financial security, and control of their own life.

    About the study

    The survey question asked, “When you think of the Good Life – the life you’d like to have – which of the things on this list, if any, are part of that Good Life as far as you, personally, are concerned?: A home you own; Good health; A happy marriage; A job that is interesting; Children; A yard and lawn/a nice garden; Free time/leisure time; Spiritual enrichment; A college education; Financial security; A luxury car or second car; Travel for leisure; Really nice clothes / accessories / jewelry; Having the latest electronics and gadgets for my home; Control over one’s own life; None of the above; Don’t know” GfK interviewed 23,000 consumers online in 17 countries in the summer 2017. Data are weighted to reflect the demographic composition of the online population aged 15+ in each market. The global average given in this release is weighted, based on the size of each country proportional to the other countries. 4 Countries included are Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Netherlands, Russia, South Korea, Spain, UK and USA. hbspt.cta.load(2405078, '95504ccc-2c71-46d8-8d2f-04ad49517883', {});
    • 09/06/17
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Home Appliances
    • Financial Services
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Travel and Hospitality
    • Automotive
    • Consumer Goods
    • FMCG
    • Home and Living
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Consumer Life
    • Global
    • English

    The mood of the world today – what are people thinking?

    In this free on-demand webinar, our experts dive into current consumer confidence and other key indicators of the consumer mindset and what it means for individual markets and brands.
Soluciones
  • Marca y experiencia del cliente

    Marca y experiencia del cliente

    Las marcas están bajo presión ya que deben desarrollar conexiones emocionales y relaciones con los consumidores que son los encargados de tomar decisiones comerciales.

  • Innovación en el mundo digital

    Innovación en el mundo digital

    Cuando los consumidores compran, buscan, se comunican, recolectan información e interactúan con empresas o marcas online, lo hacen de diferentes formas dependiendo del dispositivo o la pantalla que utilicen. Asimismo, esperan tener una experiencia consistente sin importar el canal o dispositivo que usen.

  • Oportunidades de mercado e innovación

    Oportunidades de mercado e innovación

    Las marcas se encuentran bajo una presión constante para poder mantener la relevancia en un mercado cada vez más saturado. Es fundamental saber cuándo, dónde y cómo ofrecer experiencias atractivas que generen valor añadido tanto para los consumidores como para las marcas. 

  • POS Tracking

    POS Tracking

    Tanto los distribuidores como los fabricantes están siempre bajo presión para desarrollar productos y servicios que maximicen las ventas y los beneficios, a su vez, conseguir que los clientes vuelvan.

    El éxito se basa en contar con los datos de ventas del canal minoristas más actualizados, al igual que comprender qué productos y servicios tienen un buen desempeño en el mercado (y cuáles no). Con esta información, las empresas pueden establecer estrategias claras para el crecimiento comercial y aumentar el retorno de la inversión. 

  • Experiencia del usuario (UX)

    Experiencia del usuario (UX)

    En la actualidad, se bombardea a los consumidores con promesas de experiencias fascinantes. Ellos son sofisticados y exigentes.  Para tener éxito, un nuevo producto o servicio debe ser intuitivo, útil, atractivo y deseable. La experiencia del usuario debe ser inolvidable.

    Los expertos en investigación y diseño de la experiencia del usuario  (UX) de GfK ayudan a nuestros clientes a crear y mejorar las experiencias de los clientes para productos y servicios tanto actuales como futuros.

Contáctenos
GfK, Peru
Avenida Jorge Basadre 990,
San Isidro, Lima
General