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Información inteligente: tecnología

En la sociedad conectada actual, la tecnología impacta a todas las industrias, generando oportunidades y acelerando la velocidad de la innovación.

Para mantenerse competitivas, las empresas de tecnología deben comprender la evolución de las experiencias y las elecciones de los consumidores.

Nuestros expertos en investigación de mercados para el sector tecnología ofrecen información relevante orientada a la creación de conceptos atractivos y ganadores, el posicionamiento de productos, sus estrategias publicitarias y las experiencias de compra y uso. Nuestra trayectoria en el sector del equipamiento tecnológico se extiende desde las tecnologías de la información (B2C y B2B), la electrónica de consumo, la fotografía, el equipamiento de oficina y las telecomunicaciones, hasta la investigación de sus usuarios y las tendencias de cada categoría.

GfK, Peru
Avenida Jorge Basadre 990, San Isidro, Lima
+51 1 206 2300
TechTalk newsletter

Descubra las perspectivas, las tendencias y los datos más recientes del sector tecnológico en nuestra Newsletter TechTalk.

Últimas tendencias

Aquí puede encontrar las últimas tendencias del sector tecnológico. Siga leyendo

    • 02/16/17
    • Technology
    • Global
    • English

    Mobile technology and the balancing act of global and local marketing

    The expansion of the digital world through mobile technology has leveled today’s marketing and advertising playing field, providing tools and techniques to reach a worldwide audience. But is going global the best way to make the most of your multi-channel marketing, or do you run the risk of your products and campaigns getting lost in translation across cultures? To truly maximize your effectiveness, you must find an appropriate balance between global scale and local differentiation.

    Marketing in a digital, mobile world

    In what was once a highly segmented, geographically limited market, advances in technology and the lower cost of mobile devices have introduced a new set of rules for marketers and advertisers alike. Developing and emerging markets are leaping headlong into the digital world, which now embraces millions of consumers who were left behind in a desktop-centric environment.  But while global consumers share many powerful commonalities, marketers who want to leverage the worldwide scale of a global audience run the risk of missing the boat by not integrating local differences and nuances into their campaigns. Mass media channels like Facebook and Google, for example, can be used to target or research consumers on a global scale, but there are many other popular platforms and apps whose appeal is profoundly local.  One of the 10 most popular apps in Indonesia, for example, is Gojek, which allows users to book a ride on the back of someone else’s motorcycle.  Completely indigenous to that country, this ride-sharing app was recently valued at $1.3 billion. Local opportunities such as this must be considered when experimenting with advertising effectiveness.

    Getting the global-local balance right

    Another key to finding this macro/micro balance is being mindful of global market segments that may have distinctly local flavors. In one region, members of a certain segment may have a preference for particular types of mobile apps or ways of communicating, while in another area they use their mobile phones or smartphones very differently. It’s important for global marketers and advertisers to affirm the best that each approach has to offer – to be wise about the time spent tailoring to local markets, while also not leaning too heavily on global sameness. Experimentation may take time, but regularly fine tuning your approach between global scale and local customization will lead to effectiveness improvements that can pay huge dividends. This blog post has been adapted from an article in AMA Marketing News.
    • 02/08/17
    • Technology
    • Global
    • English

    Are consumers willing to exchange personal data for rewards?

    Over a quarter of internet users (27 percent) across 17 countries strongly agree* that they are willing to share their personal data in exchange for benefits or rewards like lower costs or personalized service. In contrast, 19 percent are firmly unwilling* to share their data. Asked whether they agree or disagree with the statement “I am willing to share my personal data (health, financial, driving records, energy use, etc.) in exchange for benefits or rewards like lower costs or personalized service”, more people firmly agree with sharing personal data, in return for rewards, than firmly disagree. Those in China, Mexico and Russia were the most likely to agree firmly with the statement about sharing personal data, while Germany, France and Brazil on the other hand, had the highest amounts of people that were heavily unwilling to share their data.   Globally, people aged 30-40 were the most likely to be highly willing to share personal data (34%), followed by those in their twenties (33%) and those aged 15-19 years old (28%). Equal percentages of both men and women are firmly willing to share their data in return for benefits – both standing at 27 percent. However, more women than men class themselves as firmly unwilling, standing at 21 percent of women versus 18 percent of men. For consumers around the world who are willing to share their personal data, programmatic advertising allows brands to put them at the center of their marketing and deliver more meaningful messages that ultimately resonate deeper with them. Footnote: * GfK asked people to indicate how strongly they agree or disagree with the statement, “I am willing to share my personal data (health, financial, driving records, energy use, etc.) in exchange for benefits or rewards like lower costs or personalized service”, using a 7-point scale where “1” means “don’t agree at all” and “7” means “agree completely. The data given in this article shows the percentage of respondents selecting top two boxes (indicating strongly or completely agree) or bottom two boxes (indicating strongly or completely disagree) About the study GfK conducted an online survey with over 27,000 consumers aged 15 or older in 22 countries. As part of the survey, Fieldwork was completed in June 2015 and data are weighted to reflect the demographic composition of the online population age 15+ in each market. The countries included are Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Netherlands, Poland, Russia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Turkey, U.K and U.S.

    Interested in learning more?

    Download the full results from our global study
    • 02/08/17
    • Technology
    • Consumer Goods
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Tech Trends
    • Global
    • English

    Smartphone market up 6.6 percent year-on-year in 2016

    Continued 4G expansion in China, plus accelerating growth in Russia, drove global demand over the year. Smartphone sales in 4Q16 totaled 391 million units globally, up six percent year-on-year. All regions except Western Europe saw year-on-year growth in 4Q16.
    • 01/19/17
    • Technology
    • User Experience (UX)
    • Global
    • English

    Four reasons I won’t be going to CES next year (and four reasons I probably will!)

    I have been to CES on and off since the mid 2000’s.  My friends and colleagues typically ask me ‘how was CES?,’ expecting some techno-prophesy. There are no pithy, tweet-worthy phrases to sum up ‘how it was’.  CES is a techno-orgy; it’s like no place else.  It both attracts and repels you simultaneously. In reflecting on what I saw, there are a number of disappointments that make me say I really don’t need to go back.  Let me enumerate:
    1. Let me say it again, redundancy.  After the first 20 ‘smart light bulbs’ or ‘drones’ or ‘fitness trackers’, the brain goes numb.  Much of CES is evolution than revolution and thus finding the signal in the noise of the total product array can prove challenging.
    2. Not to be too obvious, but it bears mentioning, the focus is, in my view, entirely too much on Electronics and not enough on the Consumer. As someone more interested in the consumer experience than the electronics, I think the technology can serve itself and not the user. There are so many items displayed that I believe are solutions in need of a problem. Just because we can, does not mean we should.
    3. Similar to the previous point, technology need not solve every problem. I virtually had a panic attack when I saw a ‘dental floss’ device that I feared was Bluetooth enabled.  Thankfully, it was ‘just’ digital (dispensing and reminding), and not connected.  Even then, I’m not sure I need a digital dental floss dispenser.  Perhaps on a more culturally disturbing level, I saw several manifestations of robots for children – to be their friend, to be their helper, to rock them to sleep, etc.  The need that drives this kind of technology is indicative of perhaps larger issues.  My colleague Meredith Paige coined the term ‘Impersonal Care’ to describe this.  Much of the technological solutions displayed are of marginal value – ‘is the juice worth the squeeze?’
    4. On an entirely practical level, with all the media coverage, do I really need to be there in person? In using my Fitbit, I walked (wandered, actually) about six miles each day and felt like I had only seen the bare minimum of the show.  There’s always more to see.  There is no bottom.  So I’m thinking that since most of the media curates the important stuff, what if I just sat back and dialed in to CES Live, Engadget, CNET, press outlets, bloggers, etc?  I’d capture the most far-out and breathtaking developments from the comfort of my own home.
    While I continue to be concerned about what technology is doing to us intellectually, socially, and culturally, there are several reasons I will most likely return year on year:
    1. There are real human problems being solved in new and interesting ways. Technology is being used to make us safer (e.g., in automobiles), augment our senses (smart hearing aids), reduce waste (energy usage), etc.  Unfortunately, you’ve got to go through layers and layers to get to the important/interesting stuff.
    2. Concentration of so much technology in one small space – you can explore drones, cars, robots, appliances, etc. in a small space. If one is looking for category trends or cross-category trends they can be found in ways just not possible through the media, online or in a store.
    3. It’s a great way to stimulate the brain coming off the holidays. The whole environment is invigorating (or, for some, chaotic!).  New ideas are everywhere.  There are amazing people to meet, and some great ideas to build around.
    4. And lastly, it’s just a lot of fun. You get to see, do and try things that you might not get a chance to do anywhere else.  (When else am I going to meet and talk to Nick Offerman?)
    Next time I’m going with a plan.  I find the really interesting things are from smaller vendors, especially those in the Eureka! Hall and those startups funded by large companies (Sony had some really interesting startups present). Second, if you’re there and you want to know what’s hot, look at the crowds.  For really cool stuff, it may look as if the piranhas are feeding on the carcass of some poor erstwhile beast.  There’s usually something there. Next year, let’s hope for more revolution, more relevance, and more fun! Robert Schumacher is an Executive Vice President of User Experience at GfK. Please email robert.schumacher@gfk.com with your comments.
Soluciones
  • Marca y experiencia del cliente

    Marca y experiencia del cliente

    Las marcas están bajo presión ya que deben desarrollar conexiones emocionales y relaciones con los consumidores que son los encargados de tomar decisiones comerciales.

  • Innovación en el mundo digital

    Innovación en el mundo digital

    Cuando los consumidores compran, buscan, se comunican, recolectan información e interactúan con empresas o marcas online, lo hacen de diferentes formas dependiendo del dispositivo o la pantalla que utilicen. Asimismo, esperan tener una experiencia consistente sin importar el canal o dispositivo que usen.

  • POS Tracking

    POS Tracking

    Tanto los distribuidores como los fabricantes están siempre bajo presión para desarrollar productos y servicios que maximicen las ventas y los beneficios, a su vez, conseguir que los clientes vuelvan.

    El éxito se basa en contar con los datos de ventas del canal minoristas más actualizados, al igual que comprender qué productos y servicios tienen un buen desempeño en el mercado (y cuáles no). Con esta información, las empresas pueden establecer estrategias claras para el crecimiento comercial y aumentar el retorno de la inversión. 

  • Experiencia del usuario (UX)

    Experiencia del usuario (UX)

    En la actualidad, se bombardea a los consumidores con promesas de experiencias fascinantes. Ellos son sofisticados y exigentes.  Para tener éxito, un nuevo producto o servicio debe ser intuitivo, útil, atractivo y deseable. La experiencia del usuario debe ser inolvidable.

    Los expertos en investigación y diseño de la experiencia del usuario  (UX) de GfK ayudan a nuestros clientes a crear y mejorar las experiencias de los clientes para productos y servicios tanto actuales como futuros.

  • Oportunidades de mercado e innovación

    Oportunidades de mercado e innovación

    Las marcas se encuentran bajo una presión constante para poder mantener la relevancia en un mercado cada vez más saturado. Es fundamental saber cuándo, dónde y cómo ofrecer experiencias atractivas que generen valor añadido tanto para los consumidores como para las marcas. 

  • Tendencias y pronósticos

    Tendencias y pronósticos

    La velocidad actual de lanzamiento de nuevas ofertas, junto a la disminución de los ciclos de vida de los productos, se traducen en una presión incomparable para que las empresas se mantengan a la vanguardia.  El comportamiento de compra de los consumidores está cambiando más rápido que nunca. 

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Avenida Jorge Basadre 990,
San Isidro, Lima
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