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Información inteligente: distribución

El ritmo de cambio en el sector distribución está impulsado por los avances digitales: más puntos de contacto, más opiniones y comparaciones sobre los productos -accesibles a los consumidores en cualquier momento y lugar- y  más variedad de opciones para elegir al momento de la compra.

Para ser competitivos y relevantes, la distribución debe comprender la evolución que están experimentando los comportamientos de compra y las demandas de los grupos objetivo. Deben aplicar este conocimiento para generar experiencias diferenciadas tanto en entornos digitales como físicos.

Nuestros expertos en  investigación de mercados para el sector distribución le proporcionan la información necesaria en cada etapa del proceso: desde la medición de las experiencias de compra y los caminos hacia la misma (path to purchase), hasta monitorizar el desempeño y las tendencias de la distribución.

GfK, Peru
Avenida Jorge Basadre 990, San Isidro, Lima
+51 1 206 2300
Industry newsletter

Newsletter sobre el sector distribución

Descubra la última información del sector distribución, las tendencias y los datos del mercado con nuestra Newsletter Industry.

Últimas tendencias

Aquí puede encontrar las últimas tendencias del sector distribución. Siga leyendo

    • 11/14/17
    • Retail
    • Shopper
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Global
    • English

    What’s in store for the holidays?

    It’s again the time of the year when retailers are eager for the attention and wallet share of holiday shoppers. And the stakes are high: With rebounding household incomes and strong consumer confidence, consumers are projected to churn out a total of $678.75 billion to $682 billion this year on holiday shopping*, up from $655.8 billion last year. It’s no secret that e-commerce is expected to account for a bigger share of the pie compared to last year, bolstered largely by the continued rise of shopping on mobile devices. And consumers will embrace omni-channel strategies, be it shopping online and picking up by the curbside or researching products on their smartphones while browsing in stores. What else should marketers be aware of this holiday season?
    • Increasingly, quality beats quantity and price: Apple’s iPhone X, the company’s priciest handset ever, may have just arrived at the optimal time. Americans’ price sensitivity, which peaked during the recession, has waned with the economic recovery: According to the latest findings from GfK Consumer Life, the amount of Americans declaring that price is the most critical factor in their purchase decisions dropped to 36%, down from 41% in 2011 and 39% in 2016. On the other hand, a growing number (35%, up 3 pts from 2011) prefer to own fewer but higher quality products. Also on the rebound is enthusiasm towards new products: 38% admit that they like to buy the newest or latest version of a product, up 6 pts since 2011.
    • Deals still matter: A willingness to pay for quality, however, does not mean that bargain hunting is going out of style. In fact, over three quarters of American consumers feel really satisfied with themselves, even excited, when they get a really good deal – and this is fairly consistent across income brackets. Our persistent deal-seeking mentality is reflected in the continued success of off-price retailers such as T.J. Maxx, Ross and Nordstrom Rack, whose combined sales surged by $14 billion since 2011 and is poised to grow further, as department store sales plummeted by $25 billion.

      To woo bargain hunters, retailers are kicking off the holiday season well ahead of Black Friday by offering steep discounts now. Amazon, for example, touts best ever deals on electronics, hot toys, home goods and more when it opened its Black Friday Store on Nov. 1st. Kohl’s also started November with an aggressive one-day deal of $15 in Kohl’s Cash for every $50 spent. The company will begin to offer its actual Black Friday deals on Monday, November 20 online.
    • Think beyond products: Not all gifts that Americans will purchase this season can be wrapped up in a nice little bow. According to the Deloitte’s 2017 Holiday Survey, over a quarter (27%) plan to gift experiences, such as concert tickets, vacations and dining out. Behind this is a broader trend that demands attention.

      GfK Consumer Life data reveals that nearly three quarters of American consumers today consider experiences more important than possessions. Vacation destinations and the food they eat now represent the fastest growing forms of self-expression in the nation, as enticing vacation and ‘food porn’ photos flood social media. At the same time, cars and clothes/jewelry saw declines as personal statements. This shift in priority is reflected in consumption. According to HSBC, America’s expenditure on recreation, travel and eating out as a percentage of total spending has been trending up over the past 15 years, whereas spending on durable goods and clothing has decreased.

      But stores can also tap into consumers’ growing zest for experiences. Shopping itself is often seen as a leisure pursuit well beyond finding and buying the right product. Brick-and-mortar stores have long been drawing holiday shoppers in with picture-perfect decorations and Santa interactions for kids. With the inroad of e-commerce, stepping up the ‘experience’ element is ever more crucial for physical stores to maintain relevance. Walmart is doing just that– the world’s largest retailer is to host 20,000 holiday parties this holiday season, allowing customers to take pictures with Santa, see product demonstrations, and get gift ideas.
    • Look beyond the holiday season: While the holiday season still contributes to a large share of the retail sales, its role has dwindled: Since 1992, the contribution of the fourth quarter to annual sales has been on the decline, shifting from 32.8% of total sales back then to 28.9% in 2016. Consumers’ growing accessibility to deals throughout the year, thanks in part to the proliferation of deal sites and apps, may be partly to blame – the same way that the role of Black Friday has weakened as retailers increasingly spread out blowout deals throughout the season.

      As retailers prepare for the final stretch of the holiday race, it’s also important to have a long-term strategy to connect with the ever more experience-driven, smartphone equipped, savvy omni-channel shopper, who is still motivated by deals but willing to pay for the products that matter.
    Veronica Chen is Vice President at GfK Consumer Life. To share your thoughts, please email veronica.chen@gfk.com or leave a comment below. *Spending excludes automobiles, gasoline and restaurants
    • 11/07/17
    • Retail
    • Consumer Goods
    • Global
    • English

    Beware the star player: Why category management is the ultimate team game

    Category management is the ultimate team sport. Smart retailers, just like good football club managers, know that it takes a range of skills to create a winning team. The secret to category growth and success lies in picking the best combination of SKUs to achieve the highest category penetration. So why do so many categories look like a jumble of products all individually vying for the shopper’s attention? Manufacturers need to face up to shrinking shelf space. Four key trends are converging to create a perfect storm, and the result is that some SKUs will be relegated to the bench. Discounters such as Aldi and Lidl are redefining the notion of convenience and enabling shoppers to save on their two most precious resources, time and money. Meanwhile “ambient categories” which don’t need to be hand selected are increasingly transitioning online. Barriers to new entrants have fallen meaning that existing brands are at risk of being squeezed out. And to cap it all, private label brands are growing both in volume and prominence.

    Teamwork is the key to success

    Against this backdrop, the need to create a winning team on the shelf is paramount. Every SKU needs to earn its place on the shelf– and to make a match-winning contribution. Tesco is currently playing an excellent game on their whiskey shelf with a hero area. The bottles displayed behind the wooden and glass cabinet are super-premium, and with a price tag to match. Old Pulteney, at an eye-watering £100 per bottle, is priced well beyond the average Tesco shopper. So what game is the retailer playing? Including Old Pulteney in the assortment achieves two important objectives. The listing is intended to attract a different shopper who probably wouldn’t visit the store otherwise. They are likely to be affluent with a higher spend per visit. Secondly, Tesco wants to frame the value of other products on the shelf. Having a price tier with an attractive product which is unaffordable to most often has the effect of making the other (still relatively high ticket) items appear more palatable. So, brands at opposite ends of the spectrum become teammates.

    Train for success

    But how can we test what is happening at the shelf? How can retailers and manufacturers be sure that they are fielding the right team? The answer lies in observing shopper behavior. Fundamentally, category managers need to understand which SKUs are substitutable (i.e. easily interchangeable), and which are incremental (unique to that buying occasion). The difference is crucial, and it is vital to understand the interplay between the two. Using a virtual store platform, we can identify shopper repertoires and establish which products they consider. We then ask shoppers to make product selections based on various versions of the shelf to establish which products consistently end up in the shopping basket.

    Creating a winning team

    Using this data, we can identify which combination of SKUs create the highest total penetration. As well as establishing the point of diminishing returns, we can identify the niche products that will deliver incremental sales. Armed with these insights, category managers can optimize their assortment, and create effective team sheets which can be adapted according to the channel to deliver a winning team every time. James LLewellyn is the UK Head of Shopper. Please email James.Llewellyn@gfk.com or leave a comment below to share your thoughts. hbspt.cta.load(2405078, 'e4b9c2bf-f5ab-44f4-987f-f13c79aea956', {});
    • 10/31/17
    • Retail
    • Consumer Goods
    • Global
    • English

    Enticing shoppers to buy: Time to communicate the benefits to shoppers

    In a recent study, 62% of shoppers in a mature, low involvement category interacted with the shelf but failed to buy. Although this experiment featured a staple item which every household needs, featuring highly substitutable brands, almost two thirds walked away from the shelf. So, what’s the problem and, more importantly, how do we fix it?

    Give shoppers a reason to buy

    Supermarkets are notorious for failing to communicate the benefits of the products they sell. Often, categories within the store are unclear on the different types of products within the category and how these meet various needs and occasions. A buoyant economic climate until 2008 meant that retailers didn’t have to actively sell in stores. Marketing activity was confined to price promotions and volumes continued to rise. Things have changed, and the passive approach to category marketing is well and truly out of fashion. If you want shoppers to buy, you need to give them a reason to do so.

    Rethinking category marketing

    Retailers can help shoppers make the right decision – that is, to buy rather than walk away. When our client added point-of-sale material (POSM) to the category we described above, conversion significantly improved. This promotional activity succeeded in helping the shopper understand the choices available to them. By observing shoppers in situ, we have been able to demonstrate a clear link between proactive category marketing and increased sales.

    Virtual testing

    Testing campaigns in a virtual environment is one way to establish the effectiveness of a new strategy. Using a virtual store, we enable clients to test out new material to gauge its likely impact and to fine-tune before real store tests. For example, we worked with a client in the spirits category to reinvigorate a category experiencing low engagement in store. Our client needed to improve their “distant ID” and make the shelf more recognizable and appealing from a distance. A new planogram was created, together with a header-board on top of the shelf to entice shoppers. Virtual testing enabled us to refine the concept. The category achieved a significant lift in its ability to entice shoppers to the shelf – up from 24% to 39%.

    Ask the right questions

    To maximize their effectiveness, category stakeholders need to be able to answer three key questions:
    • Am I attracting traffic?
      • Is my category noticeable and understandable from a distance in store?
    • Are the different types of products available on the shelf clear to shoppers?
      • Are the sub-segments that meet different need states explained at the shelf?
    • Is my brand communicating the right message at the shelf?
      • Is on-shelf communication and pack design meeting consumer goals?
    The answers to these lie in understanding how shoppers behave in a store. By replicating shopper behavior in an agile, risk free environment, virtual testing offers a highly cost effective and time efficient way to maximize the effectiveness of category marketing. Combining behavioral and survey data enables us to connect with what people buy and why. Only when we have answers to these questions will we be able to stop consumers walking away from the shelf empty handed. Category marketing is changing. If you don’t give shoppers a reason to buy, someone else will. James LLewellyn is the UK Head of Shopper. Please email James.Llewellyn@gfk.com or leave a comment below to share your thoughts. hbspt.cta.load(2405078, '8fd4cbb1-cada-41ae-87a9-806a15f4e1ba', {});
    • 10/31/17
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Consumer Goods
    • Consumer Life
    • Global
    • English

    UK Consumer Confidence down one point in October

    GfK’s long-running Consumer Confidence Index slipped by one point to -10 in October.
Soluciones
  • Marca y experiencia del cliente

    Marca y experiencia del cliente

    Las marcas están bajo presión ya que deben desarrollar conexiones emocionales y relaciones con los consumidores que son los encargados de tomar decisiones comerciales.

  • Paneles de consumidores

    Paneles de consumidores

    Su negocio se basa en sus clientes, por lo que, comprenderlos es fundamental para asegurarse que los productos y servicios atiendan sus necesidades, y para identificar las oportunidades de crecimiento. 

  • Innovación en el mundo digital

    Innovación en el mundo digital

    Cuando los consumidores compran, buscan, se comunican, recolectan información e interactúan con empresas o marcas online, lo hacen de diferentes formas dependiendo del dispositivo o la pantalla que utilicen. Asimismo, esperan tener una experiencia consistente sin importar el canal o dispositivo que usen.

  • POS Tracking

    POS Tracking

    Tanto los distribuidores como los fabricantes están siempre bajo presión para desarrollar productos y servicios que maximicen las ventas y los beneficios, a su vez, conseguir que los clientes vuelvan.

    El éxito se basa en contar con los datos de ventas del canal minoristas más actualizados, al igual que comprender qué productos y servicios tienen un buen desempeño en el mercado (y cuáles no). Con esta información, las empresas pueden establecer estrategias claras para el crecimiento comercial y aumentar el retorno de la inversión. 

  • Estrategias sobre el comprador y el punto de venta

    Estrategias sobre el comprador y el punto de venta

    La era digital sigue abriendo nuevos caminos hacia la compra, cambiando cómo y dónde compran los consumidores. Cada día se habilita el acceso a más información, a medida que los compradores se adaptan a las experiencias multiplataforma de las marcas. 

  • Experiencia del usuario (UX)

    Experiencia del usuario (UX)

    En la actualidad, se bombardea a los consumidores con promesas de experiencias fascinantes. Ellos son sofisticados y exigentes.  Para tener éxito, un nuevo producto o servicio debe ser intuitivo, útil, atractivo y deseable. La experiencia del usuario debe ser inolvidable.

    Los expertos en investigación y diseño de la experiencia del usuario  (UX) de GfK ayudan a nuestros clientes a crear y mejorar las experiencias de los clientes para productos y servicios tanto actuales como futuros.

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GfK, Peru
Avenida Jorge Basadre 990,
San Isidro, Lima
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