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Información inteligente: distribución

El ritmo de cambio en el sector distribución está impulsado por los avances digitales: más puntos de contacto, más opiniones y comparaciones sobre los productos -accesibles a los consumidores en cualquier momento y lugar- y  más variedad de opciones para elegir al momento de la compra.

Para ser competitivos y relevantes, la distribución debe comprender la evolución que están experimentando los comportamientos de compra y las demandas de los grupos objetivo. Deben aplicar este conocimiento para generar experiencias diferenciadas tanto en entornos digitales como físicos.

Nuestros expertos en  investigación de mercados para el sector distribución le proporcionan la información necesaria en cada etapa del proceso: desde la medición de las experiencias de compra y los caminos hacia la misma (path to purchase), hasta monitorizar el desempeño y las tendencias de la distribución.

GfK, Peru
Avenida Jorge Basadre 990, San Isidro, Lima
+51 1 206 2300
Industry newsletter

Newsletter sobre el sector distribución

Descubra la última información del sector distribución, las tendencias y los datos del mercado con nuestra Newsletter Industry.

Soluciones
  • Marca y experiencia del cliente

    Marca y experiencia del cliente

    Las marcas están bajo presión ya que deben desarrollar conexiones emocionales y relaciones con los consumidores que son los encargados de tomar decisiones comerciales.

  • Paneles de consumidores

    Paneles de consumidores

    Su negocio se basa en sus clientes, por lo que, comprenderlos es fundamental para asegurarse que los productos y servicios atiendan sus necesidades, y para identificar las oportunidades de crecimiento. 

  • Innovación en el mundo digital

    Innovación en el mundo digital

    Cuando los consumidores compran, buscan, se comunican, recolectan información e interactúan con empresas o marcas online, lo hacen de diferentes formas dependiendo del dispositivo o la pantalla que utilicen. Asimismo, esperan tener una experiencia consistente sin importar el canal o dispositivo que usen.

  • POS Tracking

    POS Tracking

    Tanto los distribuidores como los fabricantes están siempre bajo presión para desarrollar productos y servicios que maximicen las ventas y los beneficios, a su vez, conseguir que los clientes vuelvan.

    El éxito se basa en contar con los datos de ventas del canal minoristas más actualizados, al igual que comprender qué productos y servicios tienen un buen desempeño en el mercado (y cuáles no). Con esta información, las empresas pueden establecer estrategias claras para el crecimiento comercial y aumentar el retorno de la inversión. 

  • Estrategias sobre el comprador y el punto de venta

    Estrategias sobre el comprador y el punto de venta

    La era digital sigue abriendo nuevos caminos hacia la compra, cambiando cómo y dónde compran los consumidores. Cada día se habilita el acceso a más información, a medida que los compradores se adaptan a las experiencias multiplataforma de las marcas. 

  • Experiencia del usuario (UX)

    Experiencia del usuario (UX)

    En la actualidad, se bombardea a los consumidores con promesas de experiencias fascinantes. Ellos son sofisticados y exigentes.  Para tener éxito, un nuevo producto o servicio debe ser intuitivo, útil, atractivo y deseable. La experiencia del usuario debe ser inolvidable.

    Los expertos en investigación y diseño de la experiencia del usuario  (UX) de GfK ayudan a nuestros clientes a crear y mejorar las experiencias de los clientes para productos y servicios tanto actuales como futuros.

Últimas tendencias

Aquí puede encontrar las últimas tendencias del sector distribución. Siga leyendo

    • 09/29/16
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Global
    • English

    Delivery 2.0: The new challenges – and opportunities – for retail

    Shoppers have a strong desire to receive goods when and where they want them, quickly and cheaply. Retailers are therefore harnessing the power of increasingly intelligent technology in order to fulfil this need. Most consumers (90%) who took part in our 2016 FutureBuy study have had goods delivered to their home, while almost half (48%) have used click and collect services. And these delivery methods are set to grow, with 76% of shoppers indicating that they will use home delivery more, and 38% saying they will increase their use of click and collect. Additionally, more than a quarter (28%) of shoppers claim they will use parcel lockers with greater frequency in the future. Indeed, being able to buy conveniently and speedily is the number one trend identified by our Retail Trend Monitor. But this is a challenge for retailers. Having the supply chain ready is a complex process. Furthermore, businesses have less control of the final part of the shopping process because deliveries are often outsourced.

    A focus on the “last mile”

    Being able to get a package to someone’s home fast, efficiently and cheaply is a competitive advantage. While retailers call the delivery process the “last mile”, shoppers often see it as the most important part of the process. Waiting for a parcel at home can be frustrating. For this reason, retailers have to develop ever more innovative ways for customers to receive deliveries on their own terms.   Click and collect services have been popular in the UK for several years now, and there are several emerging solutions to the delivery challenge. Doddle will open 300 outlets across the UK in the next three years that shoppers can use to collect deliveries from. Located in and around train stations, and open seven days a week, Doddle uses a website as well as text and email alerts to notify shoppers when they have a delivery for collection. £24 million has been invested in the business, which also allows shoppers to return products via its outlets, taking the pain out of returning items. Newcomer Parcelly, which recently partnered with Costcutter Supermarkets Group, lets people pick up deliveries from its 2,500 UK locations, including its KwikSave, Mace and Simply Fresh stores. This is a win-win for the retail chain because shops earn commission on each parcel collected, and attract more customers into their stores. For consumers, it means collecting goods at a time and place that’s convenient for them. Amazon Prime is offering two-hour delivery slots to people in Berlin who subscribe to its annual service, and it is doing the same in some places in and around London. Also in the UK, AmazonFresh’s customers are now benefiting from one-hour delivery slots between 7am and 11pm. Since AmazonFresh launched this service, Tesco and Sainsbury’s have introduced same-day delivery. Tesco also offers a three-hour click and collect service. This type of competition has been called the start of the groceries “time war” by some commentators. Meanwhile, DHL plans to make deliveries to people’s Smart cars in Stuttgart by accessing their vehicles using a single-use code. DHL plans to expand this service to Bonn, Berlin and Cologne.

    The next level of delivery

    Not only are retailers having to offer goods at lower prices than rivals, they are also having to make deliveries (and returns) more efficient and flexible. However, the innovations won’t stop there, with retailers and entrepreneurs pushing the boundaries all the time. Amazon, for example, is experimenting with “anticipatory shipping”. Based on big data, it will predict what shoppers are going to buy before they make a purchase. It will then proactively ship out that product. Amazon is anticipated to have more luck with doing this for some categories than others. For example, it is expected that it will be easier to do this for consumables that follow more predictable purchasing patterns like diapers or baby food. Similarly, crowd-sourced deliveries such as Nimber and MyWays are changing the retail environment as well as the expectations of consumers. Both offer people ways to earn money. Nimber (in beta at the moment) pays people to drop off parcels to someone at an address near where they are travelling to anyway. DHL-owned MyWays is an app that lets people (‘MyWayers’) pick up parcels for others from a DHL service point for a set fee. With this new raft of ways for people to receive deliveries, the onus is on retailers to make sure they keep ahead of the game. That means matching consumers’ expectations, and fast. For more information, please contact Alejandro Mondragon: Alejandro.Mondragon@gfk.com.

    Want to learn more about the Future of Retail?

    Download our report
    • 09/07/16
    • Retail
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Back-to-school shopping isn’t just about deals

    Although my own children are no longer students, I have certainly noticed that it’s back-to-school time. I’ve also noticed something interesting about the barrage of emails, store signage, and even news stories related to this shopping season: most of the messages are about saving money. This is a perfectly valid advertising tactic. But money is not a parent’s only pain point, and marketers can do much more than offer discounts to improve the shopping experience.

    Stores are still relevant for Millennial parents

    Millennial moms and dads around the world are a growing and desirable target segment.  These younger parents are ambitious and acquisitive. They are also stressed, and look to technology for solutions, including when they shop. But will this generation of digital natives avoid stores altogether in favor of online alternatives? Probably not. A recent GfK survey of Canadian parents indicates that Millennials plan to spend more than other parents on back-to-school shopping, and they plan to do most of this shopping in stores. The kids are likely to join them on these trips. Most (83%) Americans with children under age 6 go shopping with their children frequently or fairly often, as do 80% of those with children age 6-12 and 73% of those with teens age 13-17, according to recent GfK Consumer Life research. Shopping with little ones is no walk in the park, though. Retailers can consider many ways to improve the experience:
    • Offer in-store entertainment in the form of drop-off child-care centers, child-sized carts, maybe even on-cart gaming. Let parents skip the checkout line and pay via app while you deliver their cart to their car. Provide free, healthy snacks for kids. Not only will these services make parents and kids happier, it will improve the experience for other shoppers.
    • Sometimes it isn’t practical to bring children into the store – for example, if they are sick or sleeping. But parents need to shop anyway. Offer delivery services where feasible, or let parents place their order ahead of time so they can pick it up curbside when they arrive.
    • If one parent stays home with the kids and the other ventures out, help them share the shopping in a virtual way, beyond endless phone calls about what brand of cereal to get. US Millennials, including the parents among them, are more interested in experiencing various things using virtual reality or augmented reality, such as shopping as if they are in a real store.

    Make it easier for older parents, too

    Once the kids are older, shopping attitudes and behavior shift somewhat. GfK Consumer Life has found that middle-aged Gen X parents are more likely than Millennials to agree that it’s fun to browse in stores and that shopping is something for family to do together. For parents of teens and tweens, marketers can offer back-to-school shopping fun in the form of funky products and events. Yet Gen X parents are also more likely than others to say that crowds and lines are the worst thing about shopping in stores. In other words, they appreciate streamlining too. And they will continue to appreciate it after the kids turn 18, because parenting doesn’t end there. Bed, Bath & Beyond offers a Pack and Hold service so college students can order what they need for their dorms and apartments ahead of time and have it ready to pick up in the town where they’re attending school. In the college town where I shop, this is no small matter of a few boxes sitting in the back of the store. Here’s how the parking lot looked on move-in weekend – a row of shipping containers filled with labeled boxes. Inside the store, it was entertaining to watch the young adults – every single one of them accompanied by well-meaning parents intent on navigating their offspring through this transition to semi-independent living. I heard one earnest mother say, “Maybe you should get a teapot. Your girlfriend drinks tea.” That snippet of conversation held a world of meaning. Today’s parents are often accused of being over-involved in their children’s lives. But the kids don’t seem to mind. The young man with the tea-drinking girlfriend certainly didn’t. After all, he might have been getting the teapot, but he wasn’t the one buying it.

    Conclusion

    The transition to adulthood takes longer than it used to, which means that active parenting is a long haul these days. Baby Boomers are nearly past this stage of life, but Gen Xers are still in the midst of it, and Millennials are just starting out. Make it easier for them every step of the way by understanding the role that children play in their budgets, schedules, and most importantly, their hearts. Diane Crispell is a Senior Consultant with GfK Consumer Life. She can be reached at diane.crispell@gfk.com.
    • 09/06/16
    • Retail
    • Consumer Goods
    • Home and Living
    • Point of Sales Tracking
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Gardening goes smart and organic

    Our latest point of sales data shows that today's gardeners are more and more connected with their garden.
    Check out our new infographic for latest gardening trends and market developments.
    • 08/26/16
    • Press
    • Retail
    • Consumer Goods
    • TEMAX
    • Global
    • English

    Consumer Electronics market benefits from European football championship

    GfK TEMAX® results for Western Europe for the second Quarter 2016.
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GfK, Peru
Avenida Jorge Basadre 990,
San Isidro, Lima