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Medición y análisis de audiencias

Hoy en día existe contenido disponible en los medios, en los canales y, más posibilidades de elección de los dispositivos.

Los anunciantes, los propietarios y compradores de los medios  deben identificar qué canales digitales y tradicionales tienen más éxito para captar las audiencias adecuadas.

Nuestra solución de medición de audiencia es la moneda de negociación para la televisión (por ej., rating de TV), prensa, radio, exterior, online y móvil. Hacemos un seguimiento de los canales que utilizan los consumidores, cómo interactúan con el contenido, a través de que medio lo hacen y qué impulsa su comportamiento.

Mediante esta visión detallada de los contenidos, nuestros clientes no solo obtienen resultados de lo que ven o escuchan las personas, sino también por qué. Nuestra medición de mezcla de medios muestra qué dispositivos utiliza su audiencia para cada canal y tipo de contenido. Asimismo, evaluamos la eficiencia y el rendimiento de mercado a lo largo de todo el abanico de canales.

Le ayudamos a optimizar su selección de canales y contenidos para ofrecer un mayor compromiso de la audiencia, de principio a fin.

Latest insights

Aquí puede encontrar las últimas tendencias sobre el análisis y medición de audiencias. Siga leyendo

    • 03/15/16
    • Press
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Mexico
    • Spanish (Latin America)

    GfK and Nielsen in discussions to jointly launch Brazil's first cross-media advertising campaign measurement

    GfK and Nielsen announce that they are in discussions to develop a set of services for advertisers, agencies and media groups starting with Brazil’s first cross-media measurement for advertising campaigns.
    • 07/27/17
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    Does mobile engagement ring true? The need for a total media perspective

    I always like people-watching on my morning commute on the train. Not in a weird way you understand. There are people sleeping, reading, watching and listening. But nobody talks. There are several people staring vacantly into their mobile phones, scrolling and clicking. The man opposite me reads his free morning newspaper. Another is working and listening to music on his earphones. A woman watches a TV programme on her tablet. While Zenith predicts there will be a 35% increase in viewing on mobile devices (smartphones and tablets) to 28.8 minutes a day, I wonder how engaged these people really are in what they are doing. Furthermore, I wonder how one can compare those differing levels of engagement, however great or small, across the various media being consumed on the 55 minute train ride.

    How to compare mobile engagement

    It is the mobile engagement that intrigues me. I have seen it defined as the level of interaction between a brand and consumer via a mobile device. The more frequent the interactions, the higher the engagement. Apparently, people check their mobile phones 150 times a day. How should we compare multiple, short duration activities on a mobile with single, long duration activities, such as watching TV or listening to the radio? Advertising spend for mobile is forecast to have a 37% share of all media ad spend by 2021 (eMarketer). Yet there exists no uniform measure of digital ad effectiveness. Some work has been done a while ago that claims a link exists between exposure time and CTR/CPA performance. But cases have also been reported of networks buying traffic to sites and having between 75% and 95% of hits coming from bots, or non-human traffic, which opens up the thorny issue of click fraud and unverified data; or as I call it, the Internet of Sins.

    Is duration a valid online metric?

    I question the value of using duration in online metrics. Even a cursory observation of the smartphone users on my commute and one can argue that is the perfect definition of non-human traffic! Ironically, these are the same people who are so engaged when reading their smartphone screens walking through the city streets that they bump into several people coming the other way. I swear I saw one walk right into a digital outdoor advertising screen. They literally could not see an advert if it hit them in the face!

    Providing a ‘total media’ perspective

    Measuring the impact of mobile cannot be done in isolation. More advanced media measurement techniques are required to support a deeper understanding of the continually evolving media landscape. Our measurement philosophy is to provide a ‘total media’ perspective through smartly integrating media and consumer data on our Media Measurement platform. In this way, we can really see how mobile is performing alongside other media.

    Mobile engagement rings true in combination with other media

    For example, where measuring mobile engagement can work is for radio. For me, it is a chance to continue listening from the breakfast table through to the office desk, varying 3G/4G quality and tube travel notwithstanding. RAJAR reports that 25% of UK adults listen to the radio via mobile phone or tablet at least once a month (RAJAR Q1 2017), and 9 million listen through their earphones. It is a personal device made for a personal medium for a personal relationship. As the late BBC radio breakfast broadcaster, Terry Wogan, replied when asked how many listeners he had: “Only one.” John Carroll is Global Director, Business Development, Media Measurement at GfK. He can be reached at john.carroll@gfk.com or followed on Twitter @MediaCarroll.
    • 07/05/17
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    NOM and GfK to deliver total readership of print brands in the Netherlands

    NOM has commissioned GfK to integrate their print currency for newspaper and magazine brand consumption with NOBO online published media brand consumption data. This will deliver insights into the total readership of the brand across all platforms in the Netherlands. 
    • 06/07/17
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    Connecting with the “connected” TV audience

    With whom, what and how are you “connected” when you watch TV? Gone are the days that TV is a device you switch on to see what is being broadcast. For decades, we were also watching self-recorded content, and today there is an avalanche of online digital video allowing us to view whatever we want, whenever we want. Of the time spent watching video content, 35% is watched on TV live (broadcast as scheduled), 15% time shifted, 21% on demand or broadcaster catch up and 29% from an online website or streamed from an app (UK online adults, GfK Viewscape 2016). And we increasingly consume video on other devices: of all viewing time 65% is watched on a TV set, 20% on a PC/laptop, 7% from a tablet and 8% from a smart phone (UK online adults, GfK Viewscape 2016). Digital video is here to stay and the TV audience is embracing both traditional and new forms of content delivery.

    Just what is a “connected” TV audience?

    These new forms of viewing video are sometimes described as ”connected”. Does that mean that viewers watching traditional broadcast TV are “unconnected”? When I watch television, I am extremely connected, regardless of the source of the content. Once I have found the program I want to watch, I am intensely connected with the story and the characters. I am also connected with my comfortable chair. I occasionally glance on my mobile phone or in the fridge, but these are rare distractions from the big screen. For me TV is like an interactive version of cinema where I focus on the content I have chosen to see and forget about the rest of the world. Why call viewers “connected” based on the source of their content? Does it matter if we watch in a linear or non-linear way? Or does “connected” refer to us as social beings, how we connect to others?

    Understanding the connection with the content

    Some viewers tweet posts about what they watch and update their online profile to let others share in what they are viewing. Personally, I regard this as a waste of time. I might be connected with people in the room while I’m watching TV, but I am not interested in connecting with other viewers online to exchange comments on that program. I prefer to watch TV uninterrupted and unconnected. When watching TV, we create very direct and intimate relationships with the content. I can be absorbed by it, emotionally touched, informed or I simply have a good time. Sometimes I am disappointed, angry or upset. Call me old fashioned. All this happens (offline and online) in my living room, where I am cocooned in the program. The next day I might share my opinion with others, but through my viewing behavior I leave very little traces a broadcaster could scrape off the web. Maybe the distinction between connected and unconnected does not reflect how a TV audience is related to TV content. But “connection” is a key description to understand viewers and their needs. How can broadcasters and other content providers connect with viewers? How can they keep track of what content people feel connected to and what content they would prefer to avoid next time? Sure, broadcasters have access to daily ratings to see the number of viewers, but that does not measure the wants and needs of their audience.

    Content Appreciation

    To connect with a TV audience through research, you need to select a representative group of viewers. You should contact them in the proper way, ask the right questions, and listen carefully to their motivations and reactions. We have set up a system to do so. On an average day, more than 18,000 viewers in the UK, Russia, Ireland, the Netherlands and Flanders combined, tell us what they thought of all the programs they saw the day before. This means one day after the audience ratings are available, you receive the full profiles of what dramas were most entertaining, what news programs viewers felt provided the best information, and what chat shows had the best guests. You know what programs were most talked about. You see unfiltered comments on what the viewers actually thought of all the programs they watched. Using our dashboard, you can benchmark your own content against a relevant selection of your competition. We call this ”Content Appreciation” and we think it is the best solution for broadcasters to connect with their audience. hbspt.cta.load(2405078, 'c67ebd12-0b49-4cfd-887b-b1a892698de5', {});
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