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Experiencia del usuario (UX)

En la actualidad, se bombardea a los consumidores con promesas de experiencias fascinantes. Ellos son sofisticados y exigentes.  Para tener éxito, un nuevo producto o servicio debe ser intuitivo, útil, atractivo y deseable. La experiencia del usuario debe ser inolvidable. 

Los expertos en investigación y diseño de la experiencia del usuario  (UX) de GfK ayudan a nuestros clientes a crear y mejorar las experiencias de los clientes para productos y servicios tanto actuales como futuros.

Colocamos al cliente en el corazón del proceso de diseño desde el comienzo, para disminuir el riesgo de productos fallidos y altos gastos posteriores hasta el lanzamiento. Proyectamos la percepción del usuario en todas las etapas del desarrollo, desde el concepto inicial y la generación de prototipos, hasta el lanzamiento y las actividades posteriores a este.

Nuestros descubrimientos sobre las experiencias de los usuarios se reflejan en planes definidos sobre cómo diferenciar sus productos y servicios, sacar provecho de las oportunidades actuales de mercado y guiar las UX del diseño de futuros productos y servicios.

Como resultado, nuestros clientes generan experiencias atractivas y significativas, lo que se traduce en la adopción del usuario y satisfacción del cliente. 

Laboratorios de UX

Los laboratorios personalizados de UX de GfK, a través  de múltiples mercados clave, se encuentran estandarizados para asegurar la consistencia y la calidad alta, sin importar dónde se lleve a cabo la investigación. Utilizamos nuestros laboratorios de UX para presentar escenarios de prueba que atienden cualquier necesidad, desde una sala de emergencias simulada hasta una sala de estar, al igual que adaptarse a toda situación, desde grupos de debate hasta entrevistas individuales.  

También contamos con estudios móviles que permiten la recolección de datos en cualquier lugar del mundo, en cualquier entorno, para realizar investigaciones fuera del laboratorio.

Alianza de UX

Nuestro equipo de UX de GfK es miembro fundador de la UXalliance, una red internacional de experiencia de usuarios. Con más de 500 profesionales de UX a lo largo del mundo, que hablan más de 30 idiomas en conjunto, la UXalliance les brinda acceso a expertos locales con un profundo conocimiento de los mercados locales.

Para asegurar que los informes sean comparables entre países, nuestros asociados se adhieren a estrictos estándares de calidad y lineamientos sobre exclusividad. Desde 2005, hacemos que la investigación de UX mundial sea sencilla, ya que ofrecemos ahorro en los costos y plazos más acotados para proyectos en diferentes países.

Enlaces relacionados:

UXalliance

Conferencia de clase magistral semestral de UX

Últimas noticias

Aquí puede encontrar las últimas noticias sobre experiencia del usuario. Siga leyendo

    • 04/20/17
    • Travel and Hospitality
    • User Experience (UX)
    • Global
    • English

    Improving the user experience of a ticket machine interface

    We aimed to improve the user experience of Deutsche Bahn’s touchscreen user interface for customers, thereby improving the ticket- buying experience.
    • 04/06/17
    • User Experience (UX)
    • UX Design
    • UX Measurement
    • UX Strategy
    • Global
    • English

    GfK hosts 12th User Experience (UX) Masterclass in China

    GfK, in partnership with the UXalliance, will host the 12th User Experience (UX) Masterclass at the InterContinental Puxi in Shanghai on April 20.
    • 03/09/17
    • User Experience (UX)
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    How to define engaging experiences in self-driving cars

    Autonomous vehicles have the potential to disrupt everything we know about driving. Earlier this year, I attended a panel discussion regarding the advancements in autonomous driving at the 2017 Consumer and Electronics Show (CES). One conclusion from this session was that it is no longer a question of “if”, but “when” autonomous vehicles will become part of our lives.

    A blank canvas for auto manufacturers

    With no need for a steering wheel, accelerator, or brake pedals, the interior of a car becomes a blank canvas. So, how will companies shape this canvas while keeping the user at the forefront? For example, if a passenger wanted to work on their commute, a car could be customized into an office space with a desk and internet connection. Prefer to relax and recharge after a long day? A car could offer features like a massage chair or a big screen TV. And, in the case of ridesharing, a different car could be called up to fit the user’s mood. The car has the potential to become a “third-space”, a space to be used for more than a way to get to where you are going.

    Understanding the types of experiences consumers want

    UX research methods such as ethnography will help manufacturers understand what types of experiences consumers want to have in-car, and how to deliver them in a way that engages and delights. Ethnography helps designers, engineers, and researchers build empathy by taking them out of the lab and placing them in real world situations users face every day. We employ this approach to uncover insights while observing common tasks side-by-side with participants. This method uncovers behaviors and insights that wouldn’t be revealed in any other form of research, and allows us to truly see the world from the user’s perspective. These insights allow us to develop use-case scenarios and solutions that are both nuanced and relevant.

    Standing apart as the landscape evolves

    As the autonomous vehicle landscape evolves, manufacturers who are able to create truly exceptional in-car experiences will stand apart. The first step to delivering exceptional consumer experiences is understanding what consumers expect and need – and how they should be delivered. Through direct observation, ethnography has the power to uncover this. The question is, which auto manufacturer will be the first to get it right? hbspt.cta.load(2405078, 'dd7ac318-b881-41bc-b61d-84467be53b2d', {});
    • 01/06/17
    • Consumer Goods
    • User Experience (UX)
    • Connected Consumer
    • Global
    • English

    3 usability tips every appliance manufacturer should consider

    The household appliance industry has been particularly impacted by rapid-evolving technology and Connected Consumer innovations. Our user experience (UX) researchers and designers are fortunate to see and test many cool-looking prototypes that integrate these innovations before they hit the market. While we draw some of our insights from UX best practices and years of experience in UX design of appliances, having a set of benchmarks in our arsenal makes recommendations that much more powerful.

    Measuring UX in household appliance research

    We have integrated a UX measurement tool in household appliance research over several years resulting in a robust benchmark database. A scientifically-validated tool, the UX Score offers holistic insight by combining pragmatic usability aspects (learnability, operability) with hedonic qualities such as usefulness (identification, stimulation) and look and feel; this results in a score that can be compared to competitor products, different versions of the product, or, in the case of household appliances, benchmarked for the category. Our database includes years of global research covering diverse product categories from cooktops to freezers.

    Diving deeper into the individual dimensions of the UX Score

    While the overall benchmark UX Score for household appliances indicates a good user experience through its relatively high value (about 5 on a scale from 1=low  to 6=high), researchers are likely familiar with the following situation: A consumer is excited about a new idea and design, but once they attempt to use it, the disappointment surfaces. So we must dive deeper into the individual dimensions of the UX Score. Here we see the mean benchmark values by dimension for the UX Score of household appliances. Mean benchmark values of each dimension including overall benchmark (orange line) for household appliances In the “inspiration” and “look and feel” dimensions, we see high benchmark values compared to the overall benchmark line. This is fostered by continuous innovations through new functionalities that show a stimulating effect on the product experience as well as the high-quality impression. The more pragmatic “operability” dimension represents the lowest value by comparison. The location of features and information do not conform to consumer expectations. The “learnability” dimension value is also reduced – a catchy and intuitive usage of household appliances is limited.

    How to improve the user experience for household appliances

    Based on this benchmark data and UX best practices, we have established three tips for household appliance manufacturers to improve the user experience of their products:
    • Define functions and interaction design before constructing the physical interface.
      Thereby you can perfectly place functions exactly where users expect them to be. This works much better than placing the function anywhere and then trying to explain it with an icon.
    • Involve hardware designers as early as possible in the concept development process.
      Designers and hardware experts should work together as early as possible in the concept development and testing process. This will ensure the pragmatic, as well as, hedonic aspects will gain attention.
    • Opportunity of thin-film transistor (TFT) displays should not be overstrained – avoid abundance of functions.
      TFTs offer a great opportunity to explain functions. Although consumers are very familiar with the interactions via touch, too many gimmicks lead to confusion and disorientation. If no TFT is available it becomes even more essential to focus only on the most relevant functionalities. Self-explanatory icons should be found for other functions, which are then tested as early as possible (see point 1).
    As household appliance innovations continue to evolve, the strengths (hedonic qualities) seem to be well-considered. To address the category weaknesses like operability and learnability, appliance manufacturers should apply a holistic user experience design process to keep classic usability aspects top of mind. Lena Tetzlaff is a User Experience Consultant at GfK. Please email lena.tetzlaff@gfk.com to share your thoughts.
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