Möchten Sie zur deutschen Seite wechseln?JaNeina
Close
Media Measurement image

Media Measurement

Consumers have more media content, channels and more choice of devices than ever before.

Advertisers, media owners and media buyers need to identify which digital and traditional channels are most successful at attracting the right audiences.

Our audience measurement solution is the trading currency for television (e.g. TV ratings), print, radio, out-of-home, online and mobile media. We track which consumers are using what channel, how they are engaging with content across each medium and what is driving their behavior.

With this detailed view of consumers’ content appreciation our clients not only get ratings of what people are watching or listening to – they also know why. Our cross-media measurement shows what devices your audiences are using for each channel and type of content, and we evaluate your marketing efficiency and performance across the whole spectrum of channels.

We help you optimize your channel selection and content to deliver increased audience engagement, end-to-end.

Read more about Media Measurement

How well do you know the TV acronyms?

Find out with our media measurement quiz

Question /

Your score is out of .

Play again
Share quiz on Facebook
GfK. For quality media measurement

The future is today. Let’s shape it together.

Success Stories
  • Connecting the dots between digital and traditional media

    Connecting the dots between digital and traditional media

    15.03.2016

    We investigated the role of social media chatter in generating awareness and readership of Vanity Fair’s Caitlyn Jenner issue.

    Vanity Fair is an influential and iconic magazine published by Condé Nast.

    Situation

    Most media planners crave insight and data about how digital and traditional media can work together. The much talked about issue with Caitlyn Jenner on the cover offered us a perfect opportunity to explore this topic. We wanted to investigate what impact, if any, the social media buzz can have on the readership of the July issue in its traditional printed format.

    Approach

    Over a nine-week period, we surveyed 1,798 adults online who said they had read the July issue of Vanity Fair.

    Outcome

    • Four in ten adults who read the magazine first heard about the Jenner cover on social media
    • 40% of adults (ages 18+) who read the July issue had not read Vanity Fair in the previous 12 months
    • Nearly half (47%) of those readers were aged 18 and 34, indicating that the coveted millennials do read print magazines, contrary to the conventional wisdom
    • The big challenge for publishers is generating awareness among these younger readers – and it looks like social media can help with this

    Click here to download the success story

  • Optimizing TV content for a demanding audience

    Optimizing TV content for a demanding audience

    31.01.2016

    Our research helped this TV network shape its new television show featuring a Brazilian icon.

    Situation

    A broadcaster needed information about how viewers would respond to a popular entertainer’s return to the airwaves after a short absence. After the launch of the program, the company wanted to track the audience’s response to its format and content.

    Approach

    We explored social media conversations to determine which elements viewers might value in the show, and how these aligned with the host and the network. A subsequent quantitative study gauged the target audience’s intention of watching the program.

    After the launch, we tracked viewers’ behavior and opinions by integrating social media insights with audience data from the broadcaster and data from our online panel.

    Outcome

    We found that Brazilians were receptive to a new show because television program options during the evening time slot were limited.

    After the launch, we tracked user-generated content on social networks to see what elements of the show were resonating with the audience. This information helped producers strengthen the show’s content.

    Our advice also helped the commercial team to target sponsors with brands that would be a good match for the profile of the program and its audience.

    Click here to download our success story (short version)

    Click here to download our success story (long version)

     

     

Latest insights

Here you can find the latest insights for Media Measurement. View all insights

    • 02/07/18
    • Technology
    • Media Measurement
    • South Africa
    • English

    How will blockchain play a part in the future of media currencies?

    As the old saying goes: making predictions is always difficult, especially about the future. However, here is a given: there will be a lot more discussion about blockchain over the coming year. So many people have different views on how blockchain will affect the marketing and advertising industry that the potential applications of this nascent technology seem almost limitless. So instead of gazing too hard and long into our crystal balls, perhaps now is a good time to take stock and focus on some of the more realistic developments and what they mean for the industry. Following an in-depth review with leading industry stakeholders1, about how media currencies might look in five years, we discussed how blockchain might work and how it would change the way we do business. Previously published in MediaTel, we looked at the case for “The rise of the Super JICs” and a companion piece, “Chaos replaces order” in which tech drives a more anarchic, decentralized future scenario. Here we take a deeper look at how blockchain technology might be applied to the ad industry and how that might affect the future of media currencies.

    Firstly, what is blockchain?

    In essence, blockchain is a new way to store information. It is a digital record of all transactions related to a product or service. These transactions are recorded and shared among a secure, decentralized network of stakeholders. Certain attributes make blockchain technology particularly attractive to the advertising industry. It is immutable – “blocks” of transactions are continuously time-stamped and verified by the network; and once added no single party can alter it. It is shared – every party in the network can see everything, creating a transparent, “single version of the truth”. It is secure – it is encrypted so that only those agreed parties in the network can access it. At this early stage of adoption, many have been quick to jump on the blockchain bandwagon, resulting in some quite far-fetched applications which the industry may never embrace. However, some interesting opportunities were discussed at our roundtable, which could be exploited sooner rather than later. Two broad applications immediately spring to mind:
    • The regulating of agreements for buying and selling ad inventory
    • Increased consumer control over the content they are exposed to. Could blockchain replace ad blocking?
    hbspt.cta.load(2405078, 'a152c586-99ec-484f-b429-dd8155224115', {});

    Regulating the transaction of ad inventory

    Given the current issues around the “murky” supply chain in digital, it would seem that blockchain protocols are ideally placed to help provide greater transparency and accountability.
    • They could be used to regulate the agreements made between advertisers and publishers and the myriad of third parties that make up the supply chain
    • They would record all the transactions at every stage of the process
    • Only agreed parties would have access to the blockchain and be able to execute what is in the blockchain
    • All transactions would be transparent to the network
    The clearer governance that blockchain provides would no doubt go a long way to stamp out fraudulent activity such as kick-backs and arbitrage, since any re-selling of inventory would need to be agreed by the whole network. So the increased transparency would help negotiation of deals, and also help to regulate agreed contracts. Everyone in the chain would know what they have agreed to and what is delivered. One question, however, is how disputes might be settled if there are disagreements. Digital ads are executed in fractions of a second, but blockchain is much slower – so it is difficult to see real-time verification any time soon. However, it could still be a very useful post-campaign validation tool, but timestamping needs to be accurate to the millisecond, in order to marry financial transaction with ad delivery. This area also presents many additional interesting applications, if blockchain is opened up further to include consumers.

    Could blockchain replace ad blocking?

    In the future, consumers could be given more control over the type of campaigns and content they want to be exposed to. Consumers could choose which blockchain networks they want to be a part of and hence what content and ads they receive. This would place more power in the hands of the advertisers who can create deeper relationships with their customers. An added benefit to this could be a significant reduction of ad blocking because instead of blocking ads from certain platforms, the consumer can choose which advertising they want to receive. Ultimately, brands could only interact with consumers as part of agreed networks in the blockchain. Other areas of development in this area could be to verify activity and blacklist against fraudulent sites and non-human traffic. Blockchain would guarantee the validity of clicks between consumers and advertisers on verified sites. However, there are two key issues here. Firstly, one of trust: will consumers believe their data is secure and that brands will only execute on what has been agreed? Secondly, for everything to join up, there needs to be widespread adoption — multiple suppliers along the chain need to sign on the blockchain to make this work.

    Our conclusion

    We clearly have a long way to go before we get to this point – probably at least five years – but the incentives are there. If we can create a transparent supply chain, reduce ad fraud, reduce ad blocking and provide the protocols for greater accountability, then blockchain becomes a very attractive proposition. However, it’s worth bearing in mind that blockchain is unlikely to replace the media measurement systems we currently have in place. Blockchain won’t create ratings, segments, impressions and reach. Rather, it will verify whether targets have been met and confirm payment. So while blockchain promises much change, the building blocks of media measurement will remain subject to their own evolution, as outlined in our previous two opinion pieces. hbspt.cta.load(2405078, 'a152c586-99ec-484f-b429-dd8155224115', {}); Footnotes: 1How it all started: voices from across the industry. GfK and IAB Europe invited industry representatives to a round table discussion on how media measurement might look in five years’ time. Participants included: digital platforms Google, Facebook and Oath; global ad agencies Publicis and Dentsu; media owners from broadcast TV and digital; a programmatic audience platform; a national advertising association and the German JIC (Joint Industry Committee) for TV audience research, AGF.  It is the first time we have been able to discuss these issues with such a broad group and, from the ensuing debate, three possible scenarios for the future became apparent:
    • The rise of the “Super JIC” as reinvigorated, neutral data arbiters
    • Chaos replaces order, with data being controlled by different competing entities large and small
    • Technological self-regulation of data, likely in the form of an adaptation of Blockchain technology
    • 11/08/17
    • Media Measurement
    • South Africa
    • English

    Welcome to the wild-west: Is this the future of media measurement?

    The future of media measurement is a very hot topic right now. So, in association with IAB Europe, we invited industry representatives from a wide range of companies to a Round Table discussion on how media measurement might look in five years’ time. Participants included: digital platforms Google, Facebook and Oath; global ad agencies Publicis and Dentsu; media owners from broadcast TV and digital; a programmatic audience platform; a national advertising association and a large national JIC (Joint Industry Committee). Media currencies form the cornerstone of media trading, they provide a value to the media inventory that is bought and sold across TV, digital and a plethora of other platforms. However, are traditional currency systems being replaced by automated bidding? Is the media planner being replaced by an algorithm? And in the process will target groups become “identity graphs” of attributes, sometimes down to the individual level? In the future will there still be a requirement for Joint Industry Committees (JICs) to provide trusted, standardized measurement for the advertising trade? Or will tech and data providers create a new world with scalable, cost efficient technologies which are faster, more flexible and more tightly targeted?

    Issues facing the media measurement industry

    Despite rapid advances in tech, the industry has been dogged by issues of trust, transparency, fraud and a high reliance on a few digital platform players with a lot of power. There have been calls for higher transparency and better orchestration in the data world, most notably by the P&G CMO Mark Pritchard. And more recently Martin Cass at Advertising Week. It is high time to pause for a moment and reflect. Is neutral arbitration in the media industry not needed any more due to disruptive technology and the rise of data? Will chaos, ruled by smart, quick but unregulated systems replace order? That’s the discussion we are having. As a leading media measurement company, our future is linked to the industry, so this goes to the core of what we and the industry are about. We created a white paper to summarize our roundtable discussion. You can read more here to discover more about three scenarios outlined for the future:
    1. The rise of the “Super JIC” as reinvigorated, neutral data arbiters
    2. Chaos replaces order, with data being controlled by different competing entities large and small
    3. Technological self-regulation of data, likely in the form of an adaptation of Blockchain technology
    We also discuss the role of media planner in these scenarios and ultimately what this will mean for consumers, who are likely to have more control and will expect to be paid for their data. The future of media currencies is still very much open, but one thing that is clear: the proliferation of many types of data means that media planning as we know it today will be enhanced and replaced. The question as to what will fill that void is answered by our group’s three possible future scenarios. “The way people are paying for consumption will change radically, be that by blockchain, or usage of a brand and delivery of content.”
    -Simon Halstead, Oath “In five years’ time, we need to look at why we are using Reach currencies. In essence, they are a compromise. Reach planning won’t exist, either, because Effect planning is already rising sharply, or it will be used less and less. Planning can certainly be done on Effect currencies.”
    -Walter Flaat, Dentsu hbspt.cta.load(2405078, '5b1046c2-7c57-496b-b963-a4cc67ab994d', {});
    • 01/21/16
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Technology
    • Media Measurement
    • South Africa
    • English

    Is it a Netflix world after all?

    Netflix’s recent announcement of their international expansion in 2016 is not unexpected, but still somewhat breathtaking in its scope. While it may seem natural to those in the United States, where Netflix holds a dominant position in the Subscription Video on Demand (SVOD) space and in other early markets where it is a well-known brand, but this latest overseas growth is not as much “a sure thing” elsewhere.

    Eight key concerns for entering developing markets

    Certainly Netflix will enter these new markets with a well-known brand name, which may be less connected to its actual content than to the fact that US-originating digital brands often have a leg-up on local brands. Netflix will generally appeal to affluent, Western-oriented consumers outside of the North American and Western European markets. But Netflix will have a number of concerns when entering these other developing markets that make up much of the dozens being added. These include:
    • Local competitors in the Pay TV or streaming space may themselves have a dominant position. GfK works with a number of providers in the markets in which Netflix has newly launched to understand how their services are consumed. We often see a large cohort of subscribers actively viewing the kind of on-demand content that Netflix dominates in the US. These are consumers who are well served by streaming or on-demand content. For example, local South East Asian player iFlix has already built up an impressive half million subscribers in a short space of time.
    • The streaming rights to local content of interest may be held exclusively by other services.
    • The streaming rights to even Netflix’ own content may still be controlled by other providers, based on older agreements.
    • Netflix’ original, exclusive Western-focused content may not have an appeal in different cultures. Again, GfK’s work in providing Return Path Data (RPD) services have taught us that local content is absolutely crucial in building a strong customer base – even in markets where the kind of Western-oriented programming in which Netflix concentrates is popular. Netflix itself recognizes this by focusing much of its strategy on creating local content for its various markets.
    • There may be local laws regarding a certain level of locally originating content.
    • Internet access in certain countries may be limited across the population or intermittent.
    • The governments or entities controlling Internet access may arbitrarily cut access based on disagreement with content, or may use such power to censor or control what content is offered.
    • In many markets, particularly in APAC, advertiser-supported or illegal websites are often well established as sources for watching video content. So there may be resistance to paying for content that consumers have traditionally accessed by other ‘free’ means.

    Netflix’s big data advantage

    That being said, Netflix has consistently outperformed expectations of industry experts and those in the financial markets. Its daring moves in the past have mostly panned out. And, aside from content, it has an understanding of its consumers – through the use of its own collected big data – with which few of its potential competitors can hope to compare. As for its competitors, frenemies, and partners – some being all three – the growth of Netflix raises questions that only third-party accounting of Netflix can answer. This way their competition or partnership with Netflix is on a more level playing field. What do you think about Netflix’s expansion? Do you see other challenges? I would like to hear your opinion as well.
    For more information, please contact me at david.tice@gfk.com.
    • 10/21/15
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • South Africa
    • English

    Putting the me in tomorrow’s media experience: the future of the BBC

    Some people have argued that the BBC’s role in the British Media has considerably diminished over the past few years, but as the organization still reaches 97% of the population every week, I believe it still has an important role to play. Furthermore, with competition from OTT services continually rising, old Auntie can’t afford to stand still and must ensure she retains her share of the market, especially among younger audiences. Some key changes in the market. As well as an erosion of the amount of time generations are spending with TV and Radio, audiences now also want to be ‘in control’ of their content. Thinking about TV viewing specifically, viewers want to decide when they watch something, how they watch it (all episodes of a series in one sitting) and how they are going to share it with friends and family. If we look at how Radio 1 was consumed 10 years ago, for example, the changes compared to today are remarkable. Where once shows were only listened to at specific times of the day, users can now choose to rewind bits of the show they missed, or just listen to it all again later; they can tune in to their favorite shows on the car radio, but they can also listen online through the app or the website (on a range of devices); podcasts are created on a daily basis and thousands of views are registered every day on the station’s YouTube channel. Moving away from radio, the BBC has been also experimenting (successfully) with Netflix-style TV launches, making a whole series of TV shows available to its users in one go. For example, the launch of Car Share was met with millions of iPlayer requests to stream/download each episode of the series, a much higher audience volume than would have been expected had the show been released offline. Many of the changes I’ve mentioned were incorporated by the BBC long before the majority of their competitors, so they have had time to refine their strategies, as well as providing the organization valuable learnings to take forward. But in my opinion, the most interesting move is how the BBC are using audience data to improve their services. Chart Beat is a tool the BBC currently employs to analyze traffic data across all of the BBC’s websites in real time. The News and Current Affairs team monitor which stories are performing well (or not so well) on BBC News website, and how they can instantly re-arrange the webpages to increase audience engagement. The second tool that was talked about was MyBBC. This new service, using data made available by users being signed in across the BBCs platforms, will eventually provide audiences with tailored content that helps them unlock even more value from the BBC which, in the long run, will increase overall satisfaction and loyalty to the organization. The BBC has previously anticipated industry changes and reacted by developing the necessary infrastructure to fully serve its audience. From what we have heard they are developing, and from seeing how they have adapted their delivery and content strategies in the past, I think we can be confident that the BBC will continue to evolve and find new ways to serve its existing audience, as well as finding new, innovative ways to serve the next generations of viewers, listeners, readers and browsers. Niko Waesche (Global Industry Lead of Media and Entertainment @ GfK) and Nick North (Director of Audiences @ BBC) shared the presenting duties in the penultimate keynote speech of the GfK Future Consumer Summit 2015, speaking about the changes happening to the media landscape and the challenges this presents media companies of today. In the first part of the presentation, Niko focused in on the issues surrounding the industry as a whole (see part 1), while in the second half, Nick North explained the steps the BBC has taken to keep up with the ever-evolving consumer trends, and what plans the organization has to cope with changes in the future.
Contact us
Molemo Moahloli
South Africa
+27 11 803 1300
General