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Media Measurement

Consumers have more media content, channels and more choice of devices than ever before.

Advertisers, media owners and media buyers need to identify which digital and traditional channels are most successful at attracting the right audiences.

Our audience measurement solution is the trading currency for television (e.g. TV ratings), print, radio, out-of-home, online and mobile media. We track which consumers are using what channel, how they are engaging with content across each medium and what is driving their behavior.

With this detailed view of consumers’ content appreciation our clients not only get ratings of what people are watching or listening to – they also know why. Our cross-media measurement shows what devices your audiences are using for each channel and type of content, and we evaluate your marketing efficiency and performance across the whole spectrum of channels.

We help you optimize your channel selection and content to deliver increased audience engagement, end-to-end.

Read more about Media Measurement

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Success Stories
  • Connecting the dots between digital and traditional media

    Connecting the dots between digital and traditional media

    15.03.2016

    We investigated the role of social media chatter in generating awareness and readership of Vanity Fair’s Caitlyn Jenner issue.

    Vanity Fair is an influential and iconic magazine published by Condé Nast.

    Situation

    Most media planners crave insight and data about how digital and traditional media can work together. The much talked about issue with Caitlyn Jenner on the cover offered us a perfect opportunity to explore this topic. We wanted to investigate what impact, if any, the social media buzz can have on the readership of the July issue in its traditional printed format.

    Approach

    Over a nine-week period, we surveyed 1,798 adults online who said they had read the July issue of Vanity Fair.

    Outcome

    • Four in ten adults who read the magazine first heard about the Jenner cover on social media
    • 40% of adults (ages 18+) who read the July issue had not read Vanity Fair in the previous 12 months
    • Nearly half (47%) of those readers were aged 18 and 34, indicating that the coveted millennials do read print magazines, contrary to the conventional wisdom
    • The big challenge for publishers is generating awareness among these younger readers – and it looks like social media can help with this

    Click here to download the success story

  • Optimizing TV content for a demanding audience

    Optimizing TV content for a demanding audience

    31.01.2016

    Our research helped this TV network shape its new television show featuring a Brazilian icon.

    Situation

    A broadcaster needed information about how viewers would respond to a popular entertainer’s return to the airwaves after a short absence. After the launch of the program, the company wanted to track the audience’s response to its format and content.

    Approach

    We explored social media conversations to determine which elements viewers might value in the show, and how these aligned with the host and the network. A subsequent quantitative study gauged the target audience’s intention of watching the program.

    After the launch, we tracked viewers’ behavior and opinions by integrating social media insights with audience data from the broadcaster and data from our online panel.

    Outcome

    We found that Brazilians were receptive to a new show because television program options during the evening time slot were limited.

    After the launch, we tracked user-generated content on social networks to see what elements of the show were resonating with the audience. This information helped producers strengthen the show’s content.

    Our advice also helped the commercial team to target sponsors with brands that would be a good match for the profile of the program and its audience.

    Click here to download our success story (short version)

    Click here to download our success story (long version)

     

     

Latest insights

Here you can find the latest insights for Media Measurement. View all insights

    • 01/21/16
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Technology
    • Media Measurement
    • South Africa
    • English

    Is it a Netflix world after all?

    Netflix’s recent announcement of their international expansion in 2016 is not unexpected, but still somewhat breathtaking in its scope. While it may seem natural to those in the United States, where Netflix holds a dominant position in the Subscription Video on Demand (SVOD) space and in other early markets where it is a well-known brand, but this latest overseas growth is not as much “a sure thing” elsewhere.

    Eight key concerns for entering developing markets

    Certainly Netflix will enter these new markets with a well-known brand name, which may be less connected to its actual content than to the fact that US-originating digital brands often have a leg-up on local brands. Netflix will generally appeal to affluent, Western-oriented consumers outside of the North American and Western European markets. But Netflix will have a number of concerns when entering these other developing markets that make up much of the dozens being added. These include:
    • Local competitors in the Pay TV or streaming space may themselves have a dominant position. GfK works with a number of providers in the markets in which Netflix has newly launched to understand how their services are consumed. We often see a large cohort of subscribers actively viewing the kind of on-demand content that Netflix dominates in the US. These are consumers who are well served by streaming or on-demand content. For example, local South East Asian player iFlix has already built up an impressive half million subscribers in a short space of time.
    • The streaming rights to local content of interest may be held exclusively by other services.
    • The streaming rights to even Netflix’ own content may still be controlled by other providers, based on older agreements.
    • Netflix’ original, exclusive Western-focused content may not have an appeal in different cultures. Again, GfK’s work in providing Return Path Data (RPD) services have taught us that local content is absolutely crucial in building a strong customer base – even in markets where the kind of Western-oriented programming in which Netflix concentrates is popular. Netflix itself recognizes this by focusing much of its strategy on creating local content for its various markets.
    • There may be local laws regarding a certain level of locally originating content.
    • Internet access in certain countries may be limited across the population or intermittent.
    • The governments or entities controlling Internet access may arbitrarily cut access based on disagreement with content, or may use such power to censor or control what content is offered.
    • In many markets, particularly in APAC, advertiser-supported or illegal websites are often well established as sources for watching video content. So there may be resistance to paying for content that consumers have traditionally accessed by other ‘free’ means.

    Netflix’s big data advantage

    That being said, Netflix has consistently outperformed expectations of industry experts and those in the financial markets. Its daring moves in the past have mostly panned out. And, aside from content, it has an understanding of its consumers – through the use of its own collected big data – with which few of its potential competitors can hope to compare. As for its competitors, frenemies, and partners – some being all three – the growth of Netflix raises questions that only third-party accounting of Netflix can answer. This way their competition or partnership with Netflix is on a more level playing field. What do you think about Netflix’s expansion? Do you see other challenges? I would like to hear your opinion as well.
    For more information, please contact me at david.tice@gfk.com.
    • 10/21/15
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • South Africa
    • English

    Putting the me in tomorrow’s media experience: the future of the BBC

    Some people have argued that the BBC’s role in the British Media has considerably diminished over the past few years, but as the organization still reaches 97% of the population every week, I believe it still has an important role to play. Furthermore, with competition from OTT services continually rising, old Auntie can’t afford to stand still and must ensure she retains her share of the market, especially among younger audiences. Some key changes in the market. As well as an erosion of the amount of time generations are spending with TV and Radio, audiences now also want to be ‘in control’ of their content. Thinking about TV viewing specifically, viewers want to decide when they watch something, how they watch it (all episodes of a series in one sitting) and how they are going to share it with friends and family. If we look at how Radio 1 was consumed 10 years ago, for example, the changes compared to today are remarkable. Where once shows were only listened to at specific times of the day, users can now choose to rewind bits of the show they missed, or just listen to it all again later; they can tune in to their favorite shows on the car radio, but they can also listen online through the app or the website (on a range of devices); podcasts are created on a daily basis and thousands of views are registered every day on the station’s YouTube channel. Moving away from radio, the BBC has been also experimenting (successfully) with Netflix-style TV launches, making a whole series of TV shows available to its users in one go. For example, the launch of Car Share was met with millions of iPlayer requests to stream/download each episode of the series, a much higher audience volume than would have been expected had the show been released offline. Many of the changes I’ve mentioned were incorporated by the BBC long before the majority of their competitors, so they have had time to refine their strategies, as well as providing the organization valuable learnings to take forward. But in my opinion, the most interesting move is how the BBC are using audience data to improve their services. Chart Beat is a tool the BBC currently employs to analyze traffic data across all of the BBC’s websites in real time. The News and Current Affairs team monitor which stories are performing well (or not so well) on BBC News website, and how they can instantly re-arrange the webpages to increase audience engagement. The second tool that was talked about was MyBBC. This new service, using data made available by users being signed in across the BBCs platforms, will eventually provide audiences with tailored content that helps them unlock even more value from the BBC which, in the long run, will increase overall satisfaction and loyalty to the organization. The BBC has previously anticipated industry changes and reacted by developing the necessary infrastructure to fully serve its audience. From what we have heard they are developing, and from seeing how they have adapted their delivery and content strategies in the past, I think we can be confident that the BBC will continue to evolve and find new ways to serve its existing audience, as well as finding new, innovative ways to serve the next generations of viewers, listeners, readers and browsers. Niko Waesche (Global Industry Lead of Media and Entertainment @ GfK) and Nick North (Director of Audiences @ BBC) shared the presenting duties in the penultimate keynote speech of the GfK Future Consumer Summit 2015, speaking about the changes happening to the media landscape and the challenges this presents media companies of today. In the first part of the presentation, Niko focused in on the issues surrounding the industry as a whole (see part 1), while in the second half, Nick North explained the steps the BBC has taken to keep up with the ever-evolving consumer trends, and what plans the organization has to cope with changes in the future.
    • 09/01/17
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Technology
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    Researching the mind of a ‘distracted viewer’: The greater than ever role of engagement and the gains of AI

    The rules of engagement have modernized. There is no question that – for a while now- we’ve been living in the era of the ‘distracted viewer’. If anything, the re-invention of TV over the last decade should have spawned a more appreciative and engaged consumer. Firstly, content on the small screen has re-emerged as innovative, surprising, ‘wonder what comes next’ claiming, it feels, some of the old cinema aura. Secondly, more money than ever before is now spent on commissioning and acquiring content for the general TV; Netflix, Amazon and HBO announced they are spending, as a total, more than $12 billion dollars on content this year Instead, the abundance of shows to choose from combined with the plethora of devices demanding our attention have turned us consumers into the toughest of judges on a talent show at any given time. And I will explain why; whether we are streaming or still enjoying the traditional TV, viewing is rarely a single action. Online browsing, social networking, instant messaging or just good old phone ringing come in the way of a viewing experience. Unless we make a conscious decision to remain uncontactable during a viewing session, pop up alerts will be fighting for our attention throughout repeatedly asking us to make a choice as to whether the content we watch is worth interrupting; our engagement will be undoubtedly tested.

    Engagement through emotion

    So, what is it in a programme that keeps us engaged? For many decades, creatives globally (with the help of their insight teams) have been attempting to solve the engagement question, which more often than not is synonymous with international appeal and longevity of a show in the viewers’ hearts. Figuring out that emotions are some of the main drivers of engagement is almost straightforward. Deciding which are the lead emotions and how to track them is trickier. In market research, emotions are captured in numerous and cross methodology ways: from using words/emojis/open questions in quantitative surveys to having ‘emotional’ qualitative group discussions and in depth one-to-one interviews to using dial testing, heart rate tracking and machine learning algorithms like facial expression capturing and voice recognition, all used to define the emotional connection between the viewers and a new programme. But, in all honestly, creatives have been taking the lead on this one, not necessarily with the fine-tooth comb of emotions, rather with gut feeling and their years of experience taking centre stage in this decision making. Sometimes the audience choices will contradict these decisions. The most striking example of a success that was failed to spot is ‘Mad Men’; it was rejected by both HBO and Showtime before AMC decided to take a punt with it. Same with C.S.I. which was consciously overlooked by ABC, NBC and Fox and it was only the CBS executives who decided to take a chance with it. 17 years after it first launched, it continues to be the bread and butter of many schedules around the world.

    Measuring audience emotions

    So, what’s so important about emotions that can predict a show’s appeal? The answer sits somewhere between neuroscience and psychology. Think about a movie scene that increased your heart beat, made you start biting your nails again, stand up or even scream. At that particular moment, you were biometrically experiencing what was happening in the movie world, fully empathising with the feelings of the character. If then or immediately after you were asked a pure and undiluted research question like: ‘what did you think?’, any emotions would be decoded in your answer. GfK Voice allows us to do exactly that, ie. capture audiences’ emotions and their sense of engagement by translating people’s voice response to quantifiable data.

    Analyzing the ‘distracted viewer’

    Once emotions subside, people start rationalizing what they’ve experienced. Referring to that movie scene again here, if it’s memorable and worth pondering, thoughts will start coming in. Emotions will give place to reasoning and our ‘distracted viewer’ will engage in chats, tweets, will write reviews, share comments on social media and even reply to surveys offering well-thought, moulded answers. The key to unlocking the essence from all this unstructured text is artificial intelligence (A.I.). The text mining process that analyses transcripts, unlocks themes, detects how formal, informal or emotive writing is, is what we call Advanced Text Analytics. This automated process of examining text delves deep into the context behind engagement recreating the consumer’s mind. The combination of emotional decoding and artificial intelligence can shine the brightest light on the consumer’s mind and produce powerful diagnostic as well as predictive results. Engagement might be constantly tested with distractions all around us and machine learning technologies define exactly how much that is. However, in this world of distractions, the abundance of platforms consumers use to express themselves unveils the deepest insights that are often the hardest to get. And this is where A.I. benefits the most. hbspt.cta.load(2405078, '1666e93b-ae0f-44ea-ab46-054ef5cc96ff', {});
    • 08/22/17
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Media Measurement
    • Global
    • English

    A new wrinkle in over-the-top TV services: vMVPDs not so virtual anymore

    In the ever-changing world of delivering video to TVs and homes, real bellwether moments can sometimes slip by us. But the appearance on the scene of the awkwardly named vMVPDs (virtual multichannel video programming distributors) could well be such a moment.  These “skinny bundle” services offer a variety of broadcast and cable networks via on-demand streaming — and at least some channels are available to stream “live” when broadcast. The potential of this new OTT wrinkle is huge. Delivering live programming and events as they happen has been a key differentiator for traditional pay TV services as they try to fend off streaming service providers. Now, services like DirecTV NOW, Sling TV, and PlayStation Vue can begin to offer competing live programming – the opening of a potential floodgate in video media.

    Innovation worth watching

    We measured vMVPDs for the first time this year in our long-running The Home Technology Monitor™. The new Ownership and Trend Report shows that 3% of TV homes subscribe to one of the vMVPDs listed above. (It was too early to measure either Hulu with Live TV or YouTube TV). Now, three percent may seem like a “blip” if there ever was one – but every real innovation has to start somewhere. And this one in the media industry has definitely found to be worth watching. That is why we decided to collect additional information on vMVPD homes — but, as there were only 82 of them, consider the following to be directional findings, not definitive. Looking at those homes which report DirecTV NOW, Sling TV or Playstation Vue subscriptions, we find very similar levels of adoption among the three – there is not a dominant player at this point in time by any means.

    Who is subscribing to vMVPD services?

    Perhaps most interesting is where these vMVPD homes came from, in terms of reception. A small minority – just one in six – of these homes were “uncorded” before subscribing to their vMVPD service. Half cancelled regular pay TV service. And almost exactly one-third report they also have “regular” pay TV service.  And all report having a TV set and almost all say they stream to a TV set in some manner. Thus the vMVPD home is far from the cord-cutting, TV-less home some may have expected. However, if one counts vMVPD homes in the same bucket as “pay TV” – something on which there was not a consensus from our Home Technology Monitor subscribers – then the pay TV home decrease is offset, and its level holds relatively steady compared with last year. This is a definite silver lining in these difficult days for cable networks, if not their traditional MVPD partners.

    An improved user experience for viewers?

    vMVPDs with live TV will likely remain a hot topic in 2017,  as additional competitors join in — whether streaming-first brands (Hulu and YouTube) or, as rumored, traditional MVPD services. These services are banking on consumers accepting a smaller selection of networks and the promise of an improved viewer user experience compared with traditional providers. While vMVPDs will certainly be of interest to a sizable viewer niche, expansion outside the obvious Cord Cutters/Cord Never targets will require a high level of consumer satisfaction and the ability to deliver desired content. People may have many complaints about their interactions with their cable providers and their costs, the actual delivery of television to the home by pay TV tends to be very reliable – which can’t always be said for video streaming. We also see many local TV markets are still unserved by the new “live TV” streaming from broadcast networks because of affiliate agreements – the network O&Os are available, but availability outside of those markets is still sparse. But these are still early days, and several more years will likely be needed to accurately assess the long-term traction of vMVPD-type services. With several notable players all in on vMVPDs (Hulu, YouTube, AT&T, DISH and Sony) and several notables sitting it out (Amazon, Apple), it will certainly make for an interesting period for researchers, competitors and consumers. Get similar insights – and many more – as soon as they get published by subscribing to The Home Technology Monitor in 2017. Aside from our annual Ownership and Trend Report, our report topics this year include Commanding Media (voice commands), Over-the-Top TV, TV Everywhere and SVOD Digital Purchase Journey. hbspt.cta.load(2405078, '9e81766d-3de3-4a41-b18f-755b81cf461d', {});
Contact us
Molemo Moahloli
South Africa
+27 11 803 1300
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