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  • The winning brands in 2018 will get their competitive edge from memorable customer experiences
    • 01/15/18
    • -INDUSTRIES
    • Retail
    • South Africa
    • English

    The winning brands in 2018 will get their competitive edge from memorable customer experiences

    Consumers around the world are putting more value on experiences than they do on possessions, and South Africans are no different. Online shopping, commoditisation of once-expensive goods like smartphones, and a craving for simplicity among consumers are all factors that are helping to drive this trend. People increasingly agree that the thrill of a purchase fades quickly, but the memory of a great experience lasts a lifetime.

    • 12/12/17
    • Health
    • South Africa
    • English

    Five ways brand teams can align messages and touchpoints for greater commercial effectiveness

    Commercial effectiveness 2.0

    Now that many biopharma companies have turned their focus to professional and patient centricity, and even more have upped their game by using multiple, specialized experience points to serve doctors and patients better, it is time to bring the new approach to maturity by increasing coordination and effectiveness in the new multi-channel models.

    How will you meet the challenges of this new pharma/biotech commercial model?  We would like to share five ways to improve the metrics and analytics that help you optimize your combined sales force, touchpoints and message recall, and meet the challenges of this new pharma/biotech commercial model. Depending on your current business challenges, at least one approach is very likely to help you as we move into this new biopharma commercial model.

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    Five of our analytical approaches to set the wheels in motion:

    1. Improve the measurement of your competitive standing with a multidimensional share of voice

    While you may be winning share of voice with reps alone, you may be falling behind in the overall race. Consider tracking your multidimensional touchpoint reach for a more holistic and accurate guidepost.

    2. Coordinate multiple touchpoints, with the sales rep at the center

    Biopharma’s use of multichannel to reach no-see physicians has matured. Now, forward-leaning marketing and sales leaders are leveraging “rep- triggering” technology to meet customer needs. Fully leverage reps’ clearer perspective of physicians’ imperatives, and empower reps to meet customer needs. Then measure the commercial impact of the new multi-touchpoint experience.

    3. Combine the optimal set of touchpoints to improve the overall customer experience

    The needs of healthcare professionals (HCPs) are increasingly complicated. Use multi-touchpoint analytics to find the combination of touchpoints that does the best job of meeting those crucially important customer needs.

    4. Focus on impactful messages for greater impact on prescribing behavior

    Reach doesn’t matter if the message isn’t relevant. And a high-impact message that isn’t remembered is a lost opportunity. Many brands still focus too much on the percent of physicians who recall messages. In celebrating the success of high recall for some messages, they forget to test each message’s impact, and then they miss the insight that recall may be the lowest on messages that have the greatest impact on prescribing behavior.

    5. Concentrate marketing investments on the most effective touchpoints for your critical messages

    Each touchpoint can have a higher or lower transmission effectiveness for your critical messages. Brand teams and sales forces need to remember to assess their portfolio of touchpoints with regard to their effectiveness in transmitting key messages. Message transmission lets brand teams focus their investments on those touchpoints that get critical messages across to the physicians who need to know.

    Begin driving commercial effectiveness for your brand

    By applying our techniques, you’ll discover how you can align messages and touchpoints to optimize their impact.

    For a deeper dive into these five techniques for driving your brand’s commercial effectiveness, download our white paper, “Five ways brand teams can align messages and touchpoints for greater commercial effectiveness”.

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    Then let’s start a conversation so we can help guide you in the process.

    Tom Hartley is Senior Vice President of GfK’s Health business. He can be reached at tom.hartley@gfk.com.

  • GfK Customer Harmonics: Bridging the Gap between Satisfied and Loyal Customers
    • 12/12/17
    • Brand and Customer Experience
    • South Africa
    • English

    GfK Customer Harmonics: Bridging the Gap between Satisfied and Loyal Customers

    GfK Customer Harmonics is a revolutionary approach to identify the most effective actions you can take to increase customer loyalty, and target customers who are showing early risk of churn.  Our validated, customer-centric methodology monitors loyalty by focusing on customers’ experiences and relationships in a way that can account for 80 percent of the variation in loyalty - double the rate of using customer satisfaction alone. 

  • Consumer electronics sales soar in South Africa during Black Friday week
    • 12/07/17
    • Technology
    • South Africa
    • English

    Consumer electronics sales soar in South Africa during Black Friday week

    South African retailers saw strong sales during the week of Black Friday this year. Panel television unit sales experienced 47% growth and smartphone sales leaped 63% compared to the same week in 2016. The value of panel televisions sold during the week was up 41% over the comparable week in 2016, while the value of smartphone sales climbed by 34%.

  • Smartphone sales in SA rise 28% as average selling price falls
    • 11/21/17
    • Technology
    • South Africa
    • English

    Smartphone sales in SA rise 28% as average selling price falls

    South African smartphone sales climbed 28% year-on-year to 3 million units in the third quarter of 2017, while basic mobile phone sales were up 6% to 1.6 million units for the same period, according to point of sale tracking data from GfK South Africa. Smartphone revenues were up 27% compared to the same quarter in 2016, as the market accelerated its transition from basic phones.

    • 11/08/17
    • Media Measurement
    • South Africa
    • English

    Welcome to the wild-west: Is this the future of media measurement?

    The future of media measurement is a very hot topic right now. So, in association with IAB Europe, we invited industry representatives from a wide range of companies to a Round Table discussion on how media measurement might look in five years’ time. Participants included: digital platforms Google, Facebook and Oath; global ad agencies Publicis and Dentsu; media owners from broadcast TV and digital; a programmatic audience platform; a national advertising association and a large national JIC (Joint Industry Committee).

    Media currencies form the cornerstone of media trading, they provide a value to the media inventory that is bought and sold across TV, digital and a plethora of other platforms.

    However, are traditional currency systems being replaced by automated bidding? Is the media planner being replaced by an algorithm? And in the process will target groups become “identity graphs” of attributes, sometimes down to the individual level?

    In the future will there still be a requirement for Joint Industry Committees (JICs) to provide trusted, standardized measurement for the advertising trade? Or will tech and data providers create a new world with scalable, cost efficient technologies which are faster, more flexible and more tightly targeted?

    Issues facing the media measurement industry

    Despite rapid advances in tech, the industry has been dogged by issues of trust, transparency, fraud and a high reliance on a few digital platform players with a lot of power. There have been calls for higher transparency and better orchestration in the data world, most notably by the P&G CMO Mark Pritchard. And more recently Martin Cass at Advertising Week.

    It is high time to pause for a moment and reflect. Is neutral arbitration in the media industry not needed any more due to disruptive technology and the rise of data? Will chaos, ruled by smart, quick but unregulated systems replace order? That’s the discussion we are having. As a leading media measurement company, our future is linked to the industry, so this goes to the core of what we and the industry are about.

    We created a white paper to summarize our roundtable discussion. You can read more here to discover more about three scenarios outlined for the future:

    1. The rise of the “Super JIC” as reinvigorated, neutral data arbiters
    2. Chaos replaces order, with data being controlled by different competing entities large and small
    3. Technological self-regulation of data, likely in the form of an adaptation of Blockchain technology

    We also discuss the role of media planner in these scenarios and ultimately what this will mean for consumers, who are likely to have more control and will expect to be paid for their data.

    The future of media currencies is still very much open, but one thing that is clear: the proliferation of many types of data means that media planning as we know it today will be enhanced and replaced. The question as to what will fill that void is answered by our group’s three possible future scenarios.

    “The way people are paying for consumption will change radically, be that by blockchain, or usage of a brand and delivery of content.”

    -Simon Halstead, Oath

    “In five years’ time, we need to look at why we are using Reach currencies. In essence, they are a compromise. Reach planning won’t exist, either, because Effect planning is already rising sharply, or it will be used less and less. Planning can certainly be done on Effect currencies.”

    -Walter Flaat, Dentsu

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  • Capturing the Generation Z opportunity
    • 10/10/17
    • South Africa
    • English

    Capturing the Generation Z opportunity

    South Africa has a youthful population, with more than 66% of our people below 35 years old and 41% younger than 21 years old. Marketers who want to ensure the longevity of their brands and win the consumer of the future thus need to come to grips with what the under-21s - Generation Z - want and value.

  • Maximize your media effectiveness and investment with our five-step program
    • 09/28/17
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Point of Sales Analytics
    • South Africa
    • English

    Maximize your media effectiveness and investment with our five-step program

    In our interactive white paper, we share our five-step program for maximizing your media effectiveness and achieving more for your marketing budget. 

  • Smartphone and notebook sales hold up in competitive South African market, but tablets experience sharp decline
    • 09/27/17
    • Technology
    • South Africa
    • English

    Smartphone and notebook sales hold up in competitive South African market, but tablets experience sharp decline

    Retail growth in South Africa's mobile computer market has flattened out, though the market is performing reasonably well considering the tight economy, according to point of sale data from market research firm, GfK South Africa. However, the media tablet market has shrunk by about 40% in the first half of 2017, while smartphones continue to boom.

  • Jeremy Maggs interviews GfK’s Rachel Thompson on Township Marketing
    • 09/21/17
    • Consumer Life
    • South Africa
    • English

    Jeremy Maggs interviews GfK’s Rachel Thompson on Township Marketing

    Jeremy Maggs, from eNCA Maggs on Media, interviewed Rachel Thompson, Insights Director at GfK South Africa, about new GfK research which reveals how brands can connect with people in townships by aligning with their values.

    • 09/12/17
    • Brand and Customer Experience
    • South Africa
    • English

    3 basic mistakes that can ruin your customer experience survey

    The make-or-break for a customer experience survey is that it delivers a great experience in itself.  The customer has to be left feeling that their time spent in completing the survey is ultimately of direct benefit to themselves, not a wearisome sacrifice of time to benefit the company.

    I was recently sent a survey invitation asking me to give my feedback on a flight.  I decided to give it a go, but it turned out that the survey was longer than the flight (or at least that is how it felt).

    I do think it’s laudable that businesses ask for my feedback, but, while most surveys claim that the feedback will be ‘valued’, many survey experiences don’t make me feel valued. They fall into the three basic mistakes:

    • They are often far too long – compared to many people, I have a lot of motivation to complete surveys, but I sometimes give up due to the sheer length and, if I do make it to the end, I know that my last few answers to the endless grid style questions are pretty random.
    • Hygiene factors versus value-adds. I find the premise of some questions a bit odd – I understand that recommendation is a good thing for businesses, but I’m really not going to recommend my bank on the basis that I was able to withdraw my money easily, or it wasn’t a big effort to change a direct debit – some levels of service should be acknowledged as basic essentials, not value-adds.
    • Company-centric, not customer-centric. When I’m asked to give my comments, it’s often worded as wanting to find out why I gave a certain score (again mainly for recommendation). I might by cynical, but this makes me think that increasing the score is what matters to the company, rather than truly improving my experience. The survey questions must be worded from the customers’ viewpoint, encouraging them to give the information that matters to them, not just what matters to the company.

    It seems to me that for many businesses the customer survey has become just another management tool – to measure every single part of the customer journey with a ‘customer score’ – rather than a way to listen to the actual voice of the customer.  And it can’t be customer centric to get customers only to answer questions that the company wants to ask and, at the same time, dictate how they can answer (“please tick one box only”).

    What businesses need to capture are the experiences that are relevant and memorable to the customer, at the most appropriate point in time.  In order for feedback surveys to be both better experiences for the customer and ultimately more useful to the company, businesses need to be much smarter about what they ask, how they get more from less and how they connect the customer feedback to the other data they have in their business and across teams.

    4 tips for better customer experience surveys

    • If you need a score, then make the question relevant to the experience. Don’t use recommendation everywhere just because it makes your life easier to have consistency. Perhaps the customer just wants to feel happy?
    • Ask customers to describe their experience in their words – what a customer chooses to tell you is what is you need to know, because what is memorable will drive their future behaviour.
    • Let technology take the strain. Use text and voice analytics to understand not just what customers say, but also how they say it. This uncovers the root cause of their problems and the actions you need take.
    • Get everyone involved in understanding the results. Finding solutions to customer pain points shouldn’t be the sole responsibility of customer services.

    Summary

    Customer feedback needs to be treated as an energy source: it will be renewable and powerful, so long as you respect customers’ time and intelligence, design your questionnaire to be honestly customer-centric and use the results to build better experiences.

    For more information, please contact John Banerji at john.banerji@gfk.com.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Connecting with the township consumer
    • 08/29/17
    • Consumer Life
    • South Africa
    • English

    Connecting with the township consumer

    GfK research reveals how brands can connect with people in townships by aligning with their values

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