Please activate JavaScript in your browser settings to enable all features of this website.

Möchten Sie zur deutschen Seite wechseln?JaNeina
Smart Automotive Insights image

Smart insights: Technology

In today’s connected society, technology impacts all industries - driving opportunities and accelerating the speed of innovation.

To stay competitive, technology companies need to understand consumers’ evolving experiences and choices.

Our technology market research experts deliver smart insights to create engaging and relevant concept designs, product positioning, advertising and customer experiences. Our technology industry expertise spans IT and IT B2B, consumer electronics (CE), photo, office equipment and telecommunications market performance, consumer research and trends.

TechTalk newsletter

Get the latest GfK Technology news

Discover the latest Technology industry insights, trends and market data with our Tech Talk newsletter.

  • Brand and Customer Experience (BaCE)

    Brand and Customer Experience (BaCE)

    Brands are under pressure to develop emotional connections and relationships with consumers and business decision makers.  Brands need to respond in-the-moment, to enrich the customer experience – and develop strategies that influence ”moments of truth” throughout individual brand journeys.  

  • Digital Market Intelligence (DMI)

    Digital Market Intelligence (DMI)

    When consumers shop, search, communicate, gather information and engage with companies or brands online, they behave differently depending on which device or screen they are using. They expect a consistent experience regardless of the channel or device they are using.

  • Point of Sales Tracking

    Point of Sales Tracking

    Retailers and manufacturers are under pressure to develop products and services that maximize sales and profit and to keep customers coming back.

    Success relies on having the most up-to-date sales data, combined with robust analysis to understand which products and services are performing well in the market – and which are not. With this information, clients can set clear strategies for commercial growth and increase return on investment.

  • User Experience (UX)

    User Experience (UX)

    Our user experience (UX) research and design experts help our clients create and improve customer experiences for existing or new products and services

    Today’s consumer is bombarded with promises for compelling experiences. They are sophisticated and demanding.  To be successful, a new product or service needs to be intuitive, usable, engaging and desirable. The user experience needs to be emotional in order to be memorable.

  • Market Opportunities and Innovation (MOI)

    Market Opportunities and Innovation (MOI)

    Brands are under constant pressure to maintain relevance in an increasingly crowded market. Identifying when, where and how to deliver compelling experiences that deliver new value for both consumers and brands is critical.

  • Trends & Forecasting

    Trends & Forecasting

    ​Today’s steady stream of new offerings and shortening product lifecycles place a unique pressure on businesses to stay ahead. Consumer purchasing behavior shifts more rapidly than ever.

  • Geomarketing


    Our geomarketing solutions and consultancy provide our clients with smart insights into location-specific factors that impact the success of business sites, shops, sales territories, target groups, as well as chain store and distribution networks.

  • Mystery Shopping

    Mystery Shopping

    Consumers face a complex array of brand touch points every day of their lives. To deliver a consistent brand experience, marketers need to know how consumers are actually experiencing their brand. Our mystery shoppers give you all the help you need to understand these experiences, and respond to them to maximize the return for your business.

Latest insights

Here you can find the latest insights for technology industry. View all insights

    • 01/21/16
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Technology
    • Media Measurement
    • South Africa
    • English

    Is it a Netflix world after all?

    Netflix’s recent announcement of their international expansion in 2016 is not unexpected, but still somewhat breathtaking in its scope. While it may seem natural to those in the United States, where Netflix holds a dominant position in the Subscription Video on Demand (SVOD) space and in other early markets where it is a well-known brand, but this latest overseas growth is not as much “a sure thing” elsewhere.

    Eight key concerns for entering developing markets

    Certainly Netflix will enter these new markets with a well-known brand name, which may be less connected to its actual content than to the fact that US-originating digital brands often have a leg-up on local brands. Netflix will generally appeal to affluent, Western-oriented consumers outside of the North American and Western European markets. But Netflix will have a number of concerns when entering these other developing markets that make up much of the dozens being added. These include:
    • Local competitors in the Pay TV or streaming space may themselves have a dominant position. GfK works with a number of providers in the markets in which Netflix has newly launched to understand how their services are consumed. We often see a large cohort of subscribers actively viewing the kind of on-demand content that Netflix dominates in the US. These are consumers who are well served by streaming or on-demand content. For example, local South East Asian player iFlix has already built up an impressive half million subscribers in a short space of time.
    • The streaming rights to local content of interest may be held exclusively by other services.
    • The streaming rights to even Netflix’ own content may still be controlled by other providers, based on older agreements.
    • Netflix’ original, exclusive Western-focused content may not have an appeal in different cultures. Again, GfK’s work in providing Return Path Data (RPD) services have taught us that local content is absolutely crucial in building a strong customer base – even in markets where the kind of Western-oriented programming in which Netflix concentrates is popular. Netflix itself recognizes this by focusing much of its strategy on creating local content for its various markets.
    • There may be local laws regarding a certain level of locally originating content.
    • Internet access in certain countries may be limited across the population or intermittent.
    • The governments or entities controlling Internet access may arbitrarily cut access based on disagreement with content, or may use such power to censor or control what content is offered.
    • In many markets, particularly in APAC, advertiser-supported or illegal websites are often well established as sources for watching video content. So there may be resistance to paying for content that consumers have traditionally accessed by other ‘free’ means.

    Netflix’s big data advantage

    That being said, Netflix has consistently outperformed expectations of industry experts and those in the financial markets. Its daring moves in the past have mostly panned out. And, aside from content, it has an understanding of its consumers – through the use of its own collected big data – with which few of its potential competitors can hope to compare. As for its competitors, frenemies, and partners – some being all three – the growth of Netflix raises questions that only third-party accounting of Netflix can answer. This way their competition or partnership with Netflix is on a more level playing field. What do you think about Netflix’s expansion? Do you see other challenges? I would like to hear your opinion as well.
    For more information, please contact me at
    • 07/31/14
    • Retail
    • Technology
    • Travel and Hospitality
    • Consumer Goods
    • Market Opportunities and Innovation
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • South Africa
    • English

    Additional African countries added to GfK Global consumer study

    GfK now offers insights specifically into African consumers within the ‘GfK Roper Reports Worldwide’ study. For global brands, this kind of information furthers a deeper under-standing that helps them retain relevance in the African market.
    • 10/25/16
    • Technology
    • Consumer Goods
    • Trends and Forecasting
    • Tech Trends
    • Global
    • English

    Smartphones: Growth unabated in 3Q, though China expected to weigh on 2017 demand

    Global smartphone demand totals 353 million units in 3Q16. Latin America returns to growth after five consecutive quarters of decline.  Demand in Great Britain grows following ‘Brexit’ vote.  China demand to decline in 2017 due to reduced operator subsidies.
    • 10/19/16
    • Health
    • Technology
    • Global
    • English

    Easing market access of telemedicine in the US: A guide for innovators

    Diagnosing and treating patients remotely through telemedicine in both the private and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) payer markets has steadily increased in recent years.The global telemedicine market is projected to reach $34.0 billion by 2020 as patients become more aware of these services.2 Telemedicine improves access to healthcare for underserved and rural patient populations, and promotes population health management, resulting in better clinical outcomes for patients and cost savings for providers.3

    CMS set the benchmark definition of telemedicine that private payers often follow

    Medicare regulations cover and reimburse a range of telemedicine services, including the use of telecommunications and information technology, to provide access to health assessment, diagnosis, intervention, consultation, supervision and information remotely.4 According to Medicaid, telemedicine is a cost-effective alternative to the more traditional way of providing medical care (e.g., face-to-face consultations or examinations between provider and patient).5

    What about cost reimbursement and payer coverage for telemedicine services?

    Let’s look at the three categories of telemedicine:
    1. Real-time: A live interaction between a provider and a patient via a videoconference; it can be used to consult with primary care physicians, specialists and other healthcare professionals
    2. Store-and-forward: Captures a patient’s clinical data via a computer or mobile device and then transmits it to a provider for later analysis
    3. Remote monitoring: Allows continuous monitoring of a patient’s clinical data by a provider from a remote location and is more commonly used to assess chronic condition.
    Note that payer coverage and reimbursement are often limited to real-time interaction. Yet, with clear reimbursement guidance, providers and patients will more likely utilize and benefit from the technology.

    Four factors to consider when establishing a market access strategy in telemedicine

    After defining their target population, innovators must understand payers in order to align their services to the rules in place. Then they must keep in mind these four factors when establishing their market access strategy in telemedicine:
    1. Utilization of telemedicine is higher among Medicare patients than private payer patients. Traditionally, reimbursement for telemedicine services is limited to real-time consultations1 for underserved patient populations in rural areas; reimbursement is provided to the originating site (patient location) and distant site (provider location) of services. Remote monitoring is not covered and store-and-forward is only covered in Hawaii and Alaska.6 Medicaid coverage varies from state-to-state, but Medicaid reimburses telemedicine in 48 states.2
    2. Parity laws, which pursue equality, encourage private payers to cover telemedicine services if the clinical service is covered during in-person visits, but coverage decisions and reimbursement levels are made at the state level.7 Some private insurers are experimenting with direct-to-consumer business models, which circumvent third-party suppliers. Provider-based health plans can also offer telemedicine directly to patients and are not subject to standard private and CMS coverage laws.
    3. Legislature supporting telemedicine is constantly evolving. There have been more than 200 telemedicine-related bills launched this year regarding CMS coverage and coverage of store-and-forward and remote monitoring.7
    4. Adequate reimbursement through CMS and private payers will increase the adoption of telemedicine among providers and patients. These stakeholders believe in the clinical and economic advantages of telemedicine, but cannot utilize it without the support of payers. A study found that 90% of providers would use telemedicine if it were appropriately reimbursed.8 For consumers, the number one concern when considering telemedicine is that insurance will not cover it.9
    The utilization rate and investor funding in telemedicine continues to grow, making it an attractive option for innovators. But they must understand and guide the market access landscape and reimbursement definitions in order to successfully commercialize new products and services. If you have any questions or would like more information, email


    1. Siegel J, Kush J, Philip S. Telemedicine and the long-tail problem in healthcare. May 2016.
    2. Sibley G. Secure telehealth can improve access, help lower costs and protect patient data. Feb. 2016.
    3. American Hospital Association. The Promise of Telehealth for Hospitals, Health Systems and Their Communities. Jan. 2015
    4. The Code of Federal Regulations. 42 CFR 410.78.
    5. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Telehealth Services.
    6. American Hospital Association. Realizing the Promise of Telehealth: Understanding the Legal and Regulatory Challenges. May 2015.
    7. Beck M. How Telemedicine Is Transforming Health Care. June 2016.
    8. Anthem. Family Physicians and Telehealth: A First Look At Attitudes Surrounding Telehealth. Nov. 2015.
    9. Survey conducted online by Harris Poll on behalf of Xerox in May 2016 among 2,033 U.S. adults 18+.
Contact us
Molemo Moahloli
South Africa
+27 11 803 1300