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  • GfK drives its global digitalization through acquisition of digital panel specialist Netquest
    • 02/05/16
    • Mergers and Acquisitions
    • Press
    • Consumer Panels
    • Digital Market Intelligence
    • Canada
    • English

    GfK drives its global digitalization through acquisition of digital panel specialist Netquest

    GfK has acquired Netquest, the leading access panel provider with strong presence in Spain, Portugal and Latin America.

  • Generations Y, Z Differ in Key Shopping  Attitudes, Habits – GfK Study
    • 02/04/16
    • Shopper
    • Canada
    • English

    Generations Y, Z Differ in Key Shopping Attitudes, Habits – GfK Study

    From their use of computers for online purchases to their top reasons for choosing to buy in brick-and-mortar stores, Generations Y and Z part company on important points in a new GfK study of shopping habits and preferences.

  • NextGen 2016: A Hands-On Market Research Experience
    • 02/03/16
    • Canada
    • English

    02/03/16 - 03/04/16
    NextGen 2016: A Hands-On Market Research Experience

    GfK is proud to present the fifth annual Next Generation (“NextGen”) Competition in market research. In the ever-changing, fast-paced corporate world, market researchers must be able to think on their feet and bring innovative ideas to take on emerging business issues. This competition is designed to give undergraduate student researchers from North American colleges or universities a chance to test their marketing and research knowledge, using innovative techniques and perspectives to address a critical issue for today’s marketers.

  • Smartphone Users Spend as Much Time on Entertainment as Texting – GfK MRI Study
    • 02/03/16
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Technology
    • Media Measurement
    • Mobile and Location Insights
    • Canada
    • English

    Smartphone Users Spend as Much Time on Entertainment as Texting – GfK MRI Study

    According to new GfK MRI research, today’s smartphone user is just as likely to be seeking mindless entertainment – playing a game or streaming a video – as connecting with friends and family through texting or other modes. 

  • Explore the Connected Consumer
    • 01/31/16
    • Connected Consumer
    • Canada
    • English

    Explore the Connected Consumer

    It’s time to think differently. Today’s consumers are harnessing technology to reinvent themselves, their lives and their communities. They are changing the existing value system. Connected Consumers embrace freedom, acceleration and intimacy.

  • Marketing to Millennials: the new generation of pet owners
    • 01/29/16
    • Retail
    • Consumer Goods
    • Point of Sales Tracking
    • Canada
    • English

    Marketing to Millennials: the new generation of pet owners

    The Millennials, a generation of 18-35 year olds are marrying later (if at all) and delaying house purchase. In the US, this group overtook the Baby Boomers (those aged 50-69) as the largest population of pet owners in 2014. What does this mean for pet food manufacturers?

    • 01/28/16
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Retail
    • Canada
    • English

    What makes us want to look good?

    On average, we spend 4 hours a week on bathing, shaving, getting dressed, doing our hair and putting on make-up (some of us) 1. This combines almost five hours a week for women and just over three hours for men. But what are the big motivating factors that drive us to want to look our best?

    Well, when it comes to major (rather than minor) reasons – the most popular motivation is to feel good about ourselves. This was cited by 60 percent of the 27,000 people interviewed, followed by making a good impression on people we meet for the first time (44 percent) and setting a good example for our children (40 percent).

    These top three reasons hold true for both men and women. But the number one reason – to feel good about ourselves – resonates more strongly with women (67 percent women, versus 52 percent men), while the making a good first impression and setting a good example for our other two reasons are cited by almost the same percentage of men as women.

    Infographic showing top 3 reasons for looking one’s best, by gender

    Gender divide

    For men, the fourth and fifth most popular major reasons for trying to look their best are to please their spouse or partner and to make a good impression on people of the opposite sex or those they find attractive (37 and 36 percent respectively).

    By contrast, women are more motivated in trying to look their best by the wish to express their individuality and because it makes them feel in control (both standing in fourth place equal, at 40 percent each).

    Top 3 motivations change with age

    All age groups agree that feeling good about themselves is the leading major motivation for trying to look their best. But when it comes to the next most popular trigger, the age groups differ.

    Not surprisingly, people under 30 years of age are more focused on making a good impression on people they meet for the first time, and making a good impression on people of the opposite sex or those they find attractive rank. For this age group, these rank 2nd and 3rd as the major reasons for looking their best.

    For those aged 30 and above, setting a good example for their children is consistent across all age groups as the 2nd most commonly cited motivation. And when it comes to those aged 50 and over, pleasing their spouse or partner makes an appearance as their 3rd most popular major reason.

    Italians, Argentinians and Americans spend most time on personal grooming

    Italians lead when it comes to time spent on personal grooming (bathing, shaving, dressing, hair, make-up) – saying they spend just over five and a half hours per week on average. They are followed by Argentinians and Americans, who are equal at just over five and a quarter hours per week.

    At the other end of the scale, Chinese say they spend less than three hours per week on average, followed by South Koreans with just over three and a quarter hours and Japanese just over three and a half.

    Download our free data charts showing full findings for each of the 22 countries.

    About the study

    1GfK conducted an online survey with over 27,000 consumers aged 15 or older in 22 countries. Online data were collected using a staggered field start that completed in June 2015 and weighted to reflect the demographic composition of the online population age 15+ in each market. The countries included are Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Netherlands, Poland, Russia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Turkey, UK and USA.

  • Canadian Consumers Cite Self-Esteem  as Top Motivation for Grooming
    • 01/27/16
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Canada
    • English

    Canadian Consumers Cite Self-Esteem as Top Motivation for Grooming

    According to new GfK research, 60% of Canadian consumers (ages 15 and older) say their number one motivation for personal grooming is “to feel good about myself.” The GfK study also shows that “to make a good impression on people whom I meet for the first time” and “to please my spouse or partner” were tied for second among leading reasons for grooming, with each cited by 30% of Canadian consumers.

  • US Consumers Cite Self-Esteem as Top Motivation for Grooming – GfK
    • 01/27/16
    • Fashion and Lifestyle
    • Canada
    • English

    US Consumers Cite Self-Esteem as Top Motivation for Grooming – GfK

    New GfK findings show that “to feel good about myself” and “to please my spouse or partner” are the top two motivators for grooming among US consumers. The results are part of a new GfK survey – among over 27,000 consumers in 22 countries – investigating reasons for trying to look good and the amount of time spent on grooming.

    • 01/21/16
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Technology
    • Media Measurement
    • Canada
    • English

    Is it a Netflix world after all?

    Netflix’s recent announcement of their international expansion in 2016 is not unexpected, but still somewhat breathtaking in its scope. While it may seem natural to those in the United States, where Netflix holds a dominant position in the Subscription Video on Demand (SVOD) space and in other early markets where it is a well-known brand, but this latest overseas growth is not as much “a sure thing” elsewhere.

    Eight key concerns for entering developing markets

    Certainly Netflix will enter these new markets with a well-known brand name, which may be less connected to its actual content than to the fact that US-originating digital brands often have a leg-up on local brands. Netflix will generally appeal to affluent, Western-oriented consumers outside of the North American and Western European markets.

    But Netflix will have a number of concerns when entering these other developing markets that make up much of the dozens being added. These include:

    • Local competitors in the Pay TV or streaming space may themselves have a dominant position. GfK works with a number of providers in the markets in which Netflix has newly launched to understand how their services are consumed. We often see a large cohort of subscribers actively viewing the kind of on-demand content that Netflix dominates in the US. These are consumers who are well served by streaming or on-demand content. For example, local South East Asian player iFlix has already built up an impressive half million subscribers in a short space of time.
    • The streaming rights to local content of interest may be held exclusively by other services.
    • The streaming rights to even Netflix’ own content may still be controlled by other providers, based on older agreements.
    • Netflix’ original, exclusive Western-focused content may not have an appeal in different cultures. Again, GfK’s work in providing Return Path Data (RPD) services have taught us that local content is absolutely crucial in building a strong customer base – even in markets where the kind of Western-oriented programming in which Netflix concentrates is popular. Netflix itself recognizes this by focusing much of its strategy on creating local content for its various markets.
    • There may be local laws regarding a certain level of locally originating content.
    • Internet access in certain countries may be limited across the population or intermittent.
    • The governments or entities controlling Internet access may arbitrarily cut access based on disagreement with content, or may use such power to censor or control what content is offered.
    • In many markets, particularly in APAC, advertiser-supported or illegal websites are often well established as sources for watching video content. So there may be resistance to paying for content that consumers have traditionally accessed by other ‘free’ means.

     

     

     

     

    Netflix’s big data advantage

    That being said, Netflix has consistently outperformed expectations of industry experts and those in the financial markets. Its daring moves in the past have mostly panned out. And, aside from content, it has an understanding of its consumers – through the use of its own collected big data – with which few of its potential competitors can hope to compare.

    As for its competitors, frenemies, and partners – some being all three – the growth of Netflix raises questions that only third-party accounting of Netflix can answer. This way their competition or partnership with Netflix is on a more level playing field.

    What do you think about Netflix’s expansion? Do you see other challenges? I would like to hear your opinion as well.


    For more information, please contact me at david.tice@gfk.com.

  • Home Technology Monitor notable findings from 2015
    • 01/21/16
    • Media and Entertainment
    • Canada
    • English

    Home Technology Monitor notable findings from 2015

    Find out what the five most notable trends were in 2015 from The Home Technology Monitor, GfK's syndicated series of reports on media ownership, use, and attitudes.

  • Daily Contact Lenses Surpass Weeklies in Dollar Sales, Edge Closer in Box Volume – GfK
    • 01/20/16
    • Point of Sales Tracking
    • Canada
    • English

    Daily Contact Lenses Surpass Weeklies in Dollar Sales, Edge Closer in Box Volume – GfK

    Daily contact lenses continue to steal share of wallet in the US from weekly lenses, according to the latest data from GfK’s POS Tracking team. 

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